> Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit – Whitby Update LIVE – January 7, 2021 | Metrolinx Engage

Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit – Whitby Update LIVE – January 7, 2021


Archive – January 7, 2021

On January 7th, 2021 Metrolinx hosted a virtual open house for Whitby residents on the Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit project. We had 103 people in attendance and received 239 meaningful questions and comments from the community. Listening to community members and sharing information around the project is extremely important to us. Metrolinx understands and values that we are planning work in areas where people live, work and play.

Questions and answers are now available for review at the bottom of this page. Many of the questions and comments we received were similar in nature – as such, we’ve grouped the responses into themes to make it easier to find information on your topic of interest. Should you have any additional questions, please reach out to us at [email protected].

Agenda

6:30-6:45PM: Project Update & Overview

6:45-7:30PM: Question and Answers

Presentation Materials

 

Meet the Speakers

Photo of Mathieu Goetzke

Mathieu Goetzke

Vice President, Planning - Metrolinx

Photo of David Hopper

David Hopper

Consultant Lead, Parsons/IBI Group

photo of Susan Walsh

Susan Walsh

Moderator

Photo of Bill Holmes

Bill Holmes

General Manager, Durham Regional Transit

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions. Answers to questions not addressed will be posted after the event here www.metrolinxengage.com/dsbrt. Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

Comment Sort

Comments

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 13:20
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 14:55

Metrolinx understands the importance of supporting local businesses. The purpose of the Full Transit & Pedestrian Mall is to provide transit priority and improve walkability in Downtown Whitby. As part of the Transit Mall, sidewalks will be widened to increase the size of the public realm. With larger sidewalks, businesses will be able to place patios and displays outside their stores to attract customers.

We understand that businesses are very concerned about the loss of on-street parking on Dundas Street and drive-by traffic. The project team has developed a concept to expand the existing off-street parking lot at Byron Street & Elm Street. The concept can make up for all the parking spaces that will be removed from Dundas Street within about 250 metres or a four-minute walk. The project team will keep working to refine the design based on the valuable public feedback we’ve received.

Metrolinx is committed to supporting businesses during construction. In the next phase of the project, detailed design, Metrolinx will work with businesses to develop an action plan for construction that includes signage and wayfinding. Metrolinx will establish Community Liaison Committees, which have been effective in other Metrolinx projects. The Committees will foster consistent dialogue with residents and business owners where feedback can be provided on how businesses and surrounding communities will be supported through the detailed design and construction stages.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 13:29
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 14:59

The Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project is regionally important. This project is included in many regional and local plans and policies, including Metrolinx’s 2041 Regional Transportation Plan, the Durham Region Transportation Master Plan, and was studied through the completion of an Initial Business Case: http://www.metrolinx.com/en/regionalplanning/projectevaluation/benefitscases/2019-01-24-DSBRT_Final-for-Publication_updated.pdf.  

As part of the work to create the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan, Metrolinx looked at a wide range of corridors and technologies. Highway 2 in Durham Region was identified as the preferred corridor and Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred technology. This decision was reconfirmed in the 2019 Initial Business Case, which found a good cost-benefit ratio for the project. The scope of this current project phase is to advance the preliminary design, reconfirm the findings in the business case, and complete the environmental assessment.

As part of the past studies and public consultation that have been completed for the project, some elements, such as the route and the BRT technology, have been confirmed. The elements that can be modified and refined through this phase of the project is the preliminary design.

At Public Information Centre #2, which was hosted on Tuesday, November 19th, 2019 at Durham Region Headquarters in Whitby, the project team presented a number of design options. The technically preferred option for Downtown Whitby was to maintain one lane in each direction for general traffic and convert the curbside general traffic lanes to dedicated bus lanes. Through the consultation, feedback showed that the public had an interest in improving the public realm and increasing walkability in the Downtown core. As a result of the feedback, the design was modified, and the Transit Mall option was created.

Public Information Centre #3 started November 16th, 2020 and ran until January 10th, 2021. The project team is reviewing and considering all the feedback received through the Public Information Centre, including the Whitby Community Meeting held on January 7th, 2021. The feedback is being used to further refine the design, and to develop mitigation measures.

A lot of feedback was received about the preliminary design in Downtown Whitby. The project team has developed a concept to expand the existing off-street parking lot at Byron Street & Elm Street. The concept can make up for all the parking spaces that will be removed from Dundas Street within about 250 metres, or a four-minute walk. The project team will keep working to refine the design based on the feedback received.

Throughout the lifecycle of the project, regular opportunities will be given to the public to provide further feedback. Design work will continue in 2022, and Metrolinx will establish Community Liaison Committees, which have been effective in other Metrolinx projects, to support the development of detailed design and mitigation plans. The Committees will foster consistent dialogue with residents and business owners where feedback can be provided.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Mar 24, 2021 - 13:34
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:02

The project aims to improve the performance and reliability of the existing Durham Region Transit (DRT) PULSE service to serve the growing population of Whitby and Durham Region.  The current ridership on the PULSE route has exceeded initial projections by more than 50%. The service carried more than 3 million passengers in 2019.  Running more frequent transit service in dedicated bus lanes is expected to double ridership levels.  In Downtown Whitby, about 900 people get on and off the bus stops between Annes Street and Garden Street daily. Through Downtown Whitby, about 5,400 people ride the bus every weekday. In 2041 we expect 38,400 daily riders on the entire line.

The PULSE route is the busiest in the DRT network and is the spine of the system.  The Highway 2 corridor connects to many north-south routes allowing passengers to travel within the urban areas of the region.

In some areas of the route, passengers are left behind because the buses are full.  This is made worse by the delays that are caused by mixing buses in general traffic.  This project will provide dedicated transit lanes that will make bus service more impervious to traffic accidents and changing weather conditions, and allow buses to run on schedule, up to every 5 minutes during rush hour. Providing a reliable transit service draws more people to use transit.

As the population and employment opportunities in Durham Region continue to grow, there will be greater demands put on the existing transportation network.  Projects such as the Durham-Scarborough BRT will provide people with more choice and will allow the corridor to carry more people than could ever be accommodated in private cars. Separating buses from general traffic will also improve operations for the driving public.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:02

This project is currently in the Preliminary Design Phase. As part of this phase, the project will go through the Environmental Assessment process. A Preliminary Design Business Case will also be completed to confirm that the project is still a valuable investment. These processes are anticipated to be completed in late 2021. Next, the project will advance to the Detailed Design Phase. Detailed Design usually takes a couple of years and must be completed before construction can begin. Construction timing will depend on funding, permits and approvals.

Through the completion of other construction projects, Metrolinx is developing best practices and gathering lessons learned that are applied to the Durham-Scarborough BRT and other.

Due to the length of the study area, the corridor will be broken up into smaller segments for construction. A phasing plan will be developed as part of the project. In Downtown Whitby, construction will likely take place over one or two construction seasons (Spring through Fall). We understand that construction is disruptive in the short term and our dedicated Community Relations team will be on hand to answer your questions and provide updates through every stage of this important transit project. Metrolinx is committed to working with the local business community to help make the process as easy as possible and reduce delays.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:00
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:05

As part of the work to create the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan, Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to evaluate future growth areas and transportation needs in the region. In Durham, Highway 2 was identified as a key corridor for rapid transit, building on existing Durham Region Transit services and ridership. Most importantly, Highway 2 connects key destinations, existing population and employment centres, and high growth areas in Durham Region and Toronto. Other corridors in Durham Region, like Taunton Road, have also been identified in the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan for priority bus routes. Planning and preliminary design for other corridors will happen in sequence.

An Initial Business Case for the Durham-Scarborough BRT was completed for the Highway 2 corridor in 2019. This study confirmed the project is a valuable investment with a strong benefit-cost ratio.  Since the route was selected through several years of studies and community and municipal consultation, the route for this study is set. The scope of this project is to advance the preliminary design, update the business case, and complete the environmental assessment. 
 

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:06

1. Will transit priority measures be implemented prior to the Transit Mall?
2. Will the BRT stop in the Transit Mall include level boarding and the same amenities as the other shelters? Will the stops be heated?
3. Has the project team considered keeping two general traffic lanes and implementing curbside dedicated bus lanes?
4. Will local service continue to serve the corridor when the BRT is implemented?
5. Will the westbound Thornton / King stop be moved?
6. Is there dedicated cycling infrastructure? Are first-mile last-mile connections being considered?

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:07
  1. Interim transit priority measures may be considered along Dundas Street depending on funding and timing. A phasing plan is still being developed. The goal of the Environmental Assessment process is to identify the ultimate design for Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) corridor in 2041.
  2. The BRT stops within the Full Transit Mall would not have level boarding as the platforms would all be integrated with the sidewalk and be at sidewalk height. However, the Project Team developed a revised design, which provides level boarding in Downtown Whitby at the eastbound stops. The shelters will be designed to meet current accessibility standards and will have the same amenities such as seating and windscreens as other shelters. First-mile and last-mile connections were considered when developing the active transportation network.
  3. At Public Information Centre #2, which was hosted on Tuesday, November 19th, 2019 at Durham Region Headquarters in Whitby, the project team presented a number of design options. The technically preferred option for Downtown Whitby was to maintain one lane in each direction for general traffic and convert the curbside general traffic lanes to dedicated bus lanes. Through the consultation process, feedback showed that the public had an interest in improving the public realm and increasing walkability in Downtown Whitby. As a result of the feedback, the design was modified, and the north side pedestrian Mall concept was created.
  4. Durham Region Transit Pulse will be using the dedicated bus lanes to serve longer trips with higher reliability and frequency. On some portions of the corridor in Durham Region, DRT buses providing local service will continue to operate in the curbside lanes in Durham Region to serve other transportation needs.
  5. The westbound stop at King Street and Thornton Road is currently located at the intersection. The stop location can be viewed on the interactive map (www.dsbrtmap.ca) or on PDF plans: https://www.metrolinxengage.com/sites/default/files/oshawa_2020_11_12.pdf
  6. New sidewalks will be installed, and the majority of the 36 km route will have new cycling facilities. Existing and planned north/south cycling routes were identified and connections will be made as part of this project. In some of the constrained areas, alternate routes are proposed on nearby east/west streets to provide connections. For example, through Downtown Whitby there isn’t enough space for dedicated cycling with buildings set close to the road. Between Raglan Street and Garden Street, cyclists can use Mary Street and other planned cycling routes as alternates. 
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:09
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:10

We understand the importance of maintaining the character of Downtown Whitby. We have also heard that Downtown Whitby is a destination. There are opportunities to provide wider accessible sidewalks for patios, sidewalk sales, or festivities. We’ve heard that the public had an interest in enhancing the public realm and increasing walkability in the Downtown. As a result of this feedback, the pedestrian Transit Mall option was created, which doubles the width of the sidewalk on both sides of Dundas Street, while avoiding impacts to buildings and maintaining cultural heritage resources.

The additional sidewalk space can be used to enhance the existing character through streetscape improvements. Some elements of the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) shelters are also designed to be customizable to be able to incorporate public art that ties into the character of the surrounding neighborhood. Other places with comparable flex streets or transit and pedestrian malls include: Halifax NS, London ON, Ithaca NY, Cumberland MD, among others.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:10
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:11

The session was originally planned to be an hour in length. Because the presentation took longer than expected and the volume of questions was higher than anticipated, the session was extended by one hour.

The purpose of the Slido app was to allow attendees to ask questions in real time. Participants were able to “up vote” questions for panel members to answer. The majority of the top questions were selected, unless the question had already been answered, or was considered inappropriate.

The project was explained in case there were meeting participants who were learning about the Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project for the first time.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:11
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:13

The Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project will change traffic patterns. The primary goal of the project is to improve transit efficiency, reliability and comfort by providing transit priority. Transit riders will benefit from shorter and more reliable travel times. Along most of the corridor, car and truck drivers will also benefit from smoother traffic flows as vehicles will not be delayed by buses in the curb lanes.

The Transit Mall concept will change the way people travel around and through Downtown Whitby.  Our analysis shows that longer distance trips will likely move to other major roads or Highway 401.  Trips to and from the downtown core will need to use a different combination of local streets to replace the part of their trip currently made on Dundas Street.  Medium length trips passing through downtown would rely  on the major north-south roads and use some local streets differently. 

Depending on the specific start and end point of a trip, we expect most trips would move off of Dundas Street and use a combination of Mary Street, John Street and Walnut Street to the north of Dundas, and Colborne Street, Dunlop Street and Burns Street to south of Dundas, along with some trips using the north-south local streets.

We understand that traffic infiltration is a major concern. Design options are in development and will incorporate the feedback received so far.

From the Ajax boundary to Cochrane Street/Annes Street and from Garden Street to the Oshawa boundary, the technically preferred preliminary design includes widening the road to add dedicated centre-median bus lanes. In these areas, two general traffic lanes will be maintained in each direction. This means that no additional traffic capacity is being added. The exact extent of the 6-lane portions will be determined later.

The traffic analysis will form part of the Environmental Project Report that is being prepared for the project. The full report is currently under review by municipal staff from each municipality along the corridor. The traffic report will be made available for public review in mid-2021.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:37

1. Why isn’t Metrolinx reducing transit fares to increase ridership?
2. Will the Town of Whitby be compensated for the lost parking revenue?
3. Will the back alleyways be enhanced?
4. Could you maintain parking spaces if cars had to stop for buses?
5. Is the Town still considering converting two-way streets to one-way streets?
6. Why not build a subway?

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:04
  1.  In Durham Region, the corridor will be used by GO and DRT. Metrolinx only has authority over GO fares. We are looking at a full range of measures to increase ridership. We have introduced various pricing programs, such as Kids GO Free, lower fares for short-distance trips and Sunday Funday, to see how pricing affects ridership. There are various ridership recovery strategies being considered to make transit more accessible while we continue to invest in transit infrastructure that will support added services in the future.
    Durham Region Transit provided the following answer: "DRT strives to deliver an equitable and affordable service to its customers, and fares are set to meet those goals while offsetting operating costs. In the case of the Durham-Scarborough BRT project, our focus has been on improving the speed and reliability of service. This will benefit existing customers and is also expected to increase ridership. As an integral part of DRT’s network, regular DRT fares will apply on PULSE in the upgraded corridor." (Source: Durham Region Transit)
  2. On-street parking spaces are proposed to be relocated to an expanded off-street municipal lot, meaning there will be no loss in revenue to the Town.
  3. Enhancing the back alleyways is something that may be considered by the Town of Whitby. It is outside of the scope of this project.
  4. Parking spaces are being removed to more than double the width of the public realm along Dundas Street.
  5. At this point in time, Metrolinx is not aware of any active study on the conversion of two-way streets in the Town of Whitby.
  6. As part of the Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) Initial Business Case, completed in 2018, BRT was identified as the preferred transit technology. Bus Rapid Transit is more cost effective based on the forecasted ridership to 2041 and is also more flexible than Light Rail Transit or subways. The buses can enter and exit the dedicated lanes and the centre-running bus lanes could be converted to Light Rail Transit in the future, should the increases in ridership exceed the capacity of Bus Rapid Transit.
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:37
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:05

Metrolinx uses a variety of methods to inform the public of consultation events for the Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project. The following methods were used to inform the public of all three (3) rounds of Public Information Centres between June 2019 and November 2020:

  • Notice of Public Information Centre was mailed to all property owners within 30 metres of the study corridor.
  • Notice of Public Information Centre was advertised in local newspapers in two consecutive publications:
    • Ajax-Pickering News Advertiser
    • Whitby This Week
    • Oshawa This Week
    • Oshawa Express
  • Notice of Public Information Centre was emailed to all individuals on the project mailing list.
  • Public Information Centre information was advertised on the project website.

Radio advertisements were also used to notify the public of Public Information Centre #2 in Fall 2019. Metrolinx also included information on the project in its e-newsletters and on its website.

All project information can be found on the project website www.metrolinxengage.com/dsbrt. A copy of the presentation, as well as the recording of the community meeting can be found here: https://www.metrolinxengage.com/en/dsbrt/WhitbyBRTmeeting.

There is a survey on the website that can be used to submit feedback. Feedback received through this January 7, 2021 Whitby Community Meeting will also be considered and become part of the public record.

The Transit Mall may be piloted should the Town of Whitby be interested in testing the solution. However, pilots may not always provide an accurate representation of the effectiveness of the proposed design. Many features that are critical to the success of the Durham-Scarborough BRT system, such as frequent service, enhanced transit shelters and the improved streetscape and pedestrian realm cannot be provided through a pilot.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:38
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:06

Public Information Centre #3 started November 16, 2020 and ran until January 10, 2021. All feedback received as part of the Public Information Centre, including the Whitby Community Meeting held on January 7th, 2021, is summarized in a Public Information Centre #3 report. The report will be available for public review shortly.

Highway upgrades and tolls are outside of the scope of this project.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:06

The Highway 2 and Ellesmere Road corridor is a crucial transportation connection between people and jobs across Durham Region and Toronto. With rapid growth in the past decade and an expectation for this growth to continue, demand for travel along the corridor will increase. It’s anticipated there will be a 79% population growth by 2041 in Durham Region. We continue to plan for a higher capacity form of transit to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary, as we cannot continue to keep widening roads.

We understand that transit cannot be used for all trips. The purpose of improving transit in Durham Region is to make transit more competitive with the automobile so that people have more viable transportation options. This is important, as not everyone along the corridor is able to drive or owns a car. The BRT will also allow the corridor to carry more people than could ever be accommodated in private cars.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:39
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:07

For trips that either start or end in Downtown Whitby, our analysis shows that drivers will likely use the local street network around Dundas Street. A traffic management plan will be developed in consultation with Durham Region and the Town of Whitby to manage impacts.

All Bus Rapid Transit stops will be located at signalized intersections. To reach the transit stop, you would cross the street during the “walk” signal, just as you would crossing the street at signalized intersections today. Centre-median stops help increase road safety by providing a protected pedestrian refuge in mid-point of the crossing. This is especially helpful for those who require more time to cross an intersection, as the BRT stop allows individuals to cross the street over two signal phases, if required.

Through the implementation of the BRT, all sidewalks and intersections will be upgraded to meet current accessibility requirements and existing sidewalk network gaps will be connected, further increasing safety and accessibility.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:40
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:07

The traffic diversion routes will vary based on the trip length. The traffic analysis shows that 20% of trips are long distance trips that start and end outside of Whitby. For these trips, drivers are anticipated to use Highway 401 or Taunton Road. 46% of trips are considered medium distance and travel within Whitby. For these trips, the planned connections like Manning Road/Bonacord Avenue, Dunlop Street, Burns Street and Consumers Drive are anticipated to become new travel routes. For the remaining 34% trips that either start or end in the Downtown, drivers will likely use more local streets.

Some stopped controlled intersections may become signalized to accommodate the increase in traffic as a result of the proposed connections, background traffic growth, or the BRT.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 15:41
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:07

Over the last several months, public health restrictions in response to COVID-19 have had a large impact on travel patterns. While there is uncertainty surrounding the “new normal”, we know that the use of private cars for all trips is not sustainable or viable.  Transit ridership patterns go up and down but over time, the long-term trend is continuing up. Durham Region will continue to grow, and we need to find solutions to move more people more efficiently.

Cities around the world have found that public transit plays a vital role in the mobility of urban areas. Transit remains an essential service and is required for those who do not have a vehicle or cannot drive. The importance of transit has been echoed by the Province’s recent actions, which declared transit as critical infrastructure.

Metrolinx is investigating those potential long-term impacts of COVID-19 on transit ridership; however, it is too soon to apply this work to our projections, as there is currently insufficient data and information available.

The pandemic to date has had an impact of the movement of people and goods, including travel patterns and behaviours. While the industry expects it will take a few years for transit ridership to recover to pre-pandemic levels, note that the Durham-Scarborough BRT is not expected to be delivered until the late 2020s.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:08
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:09

We understand that parking is important to businesses in Downtown Whitby. The Transit Mall requires 31 parking spots to be removed from Dundas Street, west of Brock Street. We proposed to replace those 31 spots by expanding the off-street municipal parking lot near the intersection of Elm Street and Byron Street, which is about a four-minute walk away (around 250 metres). The off-street lot expansion would provide three fully accessible parking spaces plus a loading zone on Byron Street near Dundas Street. We will keep working to refine the design based on the feedback received.

In general, parallel parking spots are preferred over angled parking spots. The design has since been revised to remove the angled parking spots.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:11
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:12

Listening to community members and sharing information around the project is extremely important to us. Metrolinx understands and values that we are planning work in areas where people live, work and play. We are working to find the right balance between the need for expanded transit to serve this growing region, while taking into consideration the valuable community feedback we’ve received to date.

We thank you for your participation and support.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:13
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:13

For safety reasons, a curb-height raised island is proposed along most of Highway 2 with the introduction of dedicated bus lanes. This raised median will increase traffic safety by restricting left-turns to signalized intersections only. Left-turns will no longer be possible at unsignalized driveways and side streets.

Instead of making a left-turn into an unsignalized side street, in the future, drivers may choose to take an alternate route that allows them to turn right onto the side street. Alternatively, drivers could travel past the unsignalized side street and make a u-turn at the next signalized intersection. U-turns will be accommodated at all signalized intersections from a dedicated left-turn/u-turn lane during a fully protected signal phase (green arrow).

With the bus lanes in the middle of the road, there is added width between the left turn/u-turn lane and the first lane of traffic in the opposite direction. This makes it easier for vehicles to make the u-turn movement, when compared to typical intersection without centre-running bus lanes. In addition, u-turns and left-turns will happen while all other traffic has a red light, which improves safety. This is also in line with Region’s Strategic Road Safety Action Plan, which incorporates Vision Zero, to reduce the number and severity of collisions in the Region.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 24, 2021 - 16:14

We understand that incidents will occur on parallel routes, such as Highway 401, which will result in additional traffic and congestion on Highway 2.

If Highway 2 does become congested due to an incident on Highway 401, the dedicated transit lanes will be largely unaffected, allowing people to rely on transit to reach their destination rather than drive through congestion.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0