> The Ontario Line - Neighbourhood Updates - West | Metrolinx Engage

West Segment

The Ontario Line - Neighbourhood Updates - West

The following plans describe the alignment (route) of the line, and the proposed location of station structures and entrance locations.

map of the west segment of the Ontario line

Click image to enlarge

Travelling diagonally will give customers a ride that is smoother, more comfortable and faster. This also reduces track maintenance, which means less risk of delays due to repairs making for a more reliable service. Due to the depth of the tunnelling through these areas, we expect any impacts will be comparable to the previous plan and that the majority of buildings overhead will not be needed to accommodate construction. Tunnelling deep into the bedrock below the surface and reducing the curvature of the route reduces the potential for vibration and noise and allows us to deliver the Ontario Line in a way that provides faster service while minimizing or avoiding impacts to the built environment.

Two-dimensional map of Exhibition station and the surrounding area. The map depicts a rough outline of the projected station building footprint, anticipated station entrance points, emergency exit and tunnel entrance points, permanent property requirements, the tunnel portal structure to bring trains from above-ground at Exhibition station to underground heading east, as well as GO tracks, future Ontario Line tracks, and streetcar routes and stops. Note that heritage attributes will be preserved and conserved wherever possible.

Click image to enlarge

Three-dimensional map of properties north of Exhibition station. A burnt-orange colour denotes properties that will be permanently impacted by Ontario Line construction, including the following: 153 Dufferin Street, 7 Fraser Avenue, 2 and 20 Atlantic Avenue, and 1 Atlantic Avenue. Note that heritage attributes will be conserved where possible.

Permanent property impacts
Click image to enlarge

Basic three-dimensional map pictures the future state concept for station buildings are pictured in purple. No design details are pictured beyond the basic building structures.

Future state concept
Click image to enlarge

Exhibition Station serves one of the most popular destinations for sports, concerts, and trade shows in the country, not to mention family attractions like the CNE. The Ontario Line at Exhibition Station will create a connection to the GO network and bring the subway system closer to many homes and businesses in the growing and vibrant Liberty Village community.

The above-ground shared concourse between the Ontario Line and Lakeshore West GO services will make transferring between the two quick and seamless for the approximately 6,300 people who will make that switch every day during the busiest travel hour.

Giving customers another way to transfer between GO Transit’s regional rail services and the local subway system will take pressure off of Union Station, the country’s busiest transit hub. This new interchange will help reduce crowding at Union by about 14 per cent – or 14,000 fewer people – during rush hour.

The Ontario Line will also be just steps away from the 511 Bathurst and 509 Harbourfront streetcars, giving customers even more ways to navigate and explore the city.

The Ontario Line station at Exhibition will be within a short 10-minute walk of more than 12,100 residents, bringing rapid transit to the growing and underserved neighbourhoods of Liberty Village and Parkdale where more than 2,700 households don’t own a car. It will also connect to more than 17,600 jobs in the area by 2041.

A portal will be constructed on the north side of the existing GO Corridor for the beginning of the Ontario Line tunnels.

Tail tracks, west of Exhibition, will provide space for the storage of Ontario Line vehicles and protect for a future extension of the line.

We know how important the heritage properties are in this area and we’re committed to featuring heritage attributes in our station designs to respect the important history and character of the neighbourhood. We will be engaging with communities on these plans as we gather more details.

Construction on enabling early works, including new passenger tunnels, an extension to the existing passenger tunnel, a temporary pedestrian bridge, a new north platform, and utility relocation and protection, is anticipated to begin in 2021.

Learn more about Procurement.

Stats and Facts*

  • 12,100 people within walking distance to station
  • 12,100 customers will use the station during the busiest travel hour (8,400 getting on and 3,700 getting off the Ontario Line)
  • 6,300 transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 17,600 jobs in the area

*Forecast for the year 2041

Two-dimensional map of two future station entrance buildings at King Street West and Bathurst Street and the surrounding area. One building is located on the northeast corner, and the second building is located on the southeast corner. The map depicts a rough outline of the projected station buildings’ footprints, anticipated station entrance points, permanent property requirements, and streetcar routes and stops. Note heritage attributes will be conserved where possible.

Click image to enlarge

Three-dimensional map of permanent property impacts at King and Bathurst. A burnt-orange colour denotes properties that will be permanently impacted by Ontario Line construction, including the following: 663 King Street West on the southeast corner, and 662 and 668 King Street West on the northeast corner. Note heritage attributes will be conserved where possible.

Permanent property impacts
Click image to enlarge

Basic three-dimensional map pictures the future state concept for station buildings are pictured in purple. No design details are pictured beyond the basic building structures.

Future state concept
Click image to enlarge

In the heart of Toronto’s Fashion District, where almost 8,700 households currently don’t own a car, the station at King and Bathurst will offer vital connections between the Ontario Line and the popular 504 King route and the 511 Bathurst route. Current plans envision maintaining streetcar service in these areas throughout the duration of the project, though there might be times when service is re-routed or reduced to accommodate construction work.

Underground, the station platform is on a diagonal and avoids significant construction impacts to the historic Wheat Sheaf Tavern. Built in 1849, the landmark building with the distinctive mansard roof is widely believed to be the oldest pub in Toronto.

Station entrances have been placed only a few steps away from streetcar stops on both the north and south corners of the intersection, allowing Ontario Line customers to walk from their subway platform directly to their preferred streetcar stop without having to cross the street.

The station will be within a short 10-minute walk for more than 27,000 residents and connect people to the 24,200 jobs the area will support by 2041.

We know how important the heritage properties are in this area and we’re committed to featuring heritage attributes in our station designs to respect the important history and character of the neighbourhood. We will be engaging with communities on these plans as we gather more details.

Work is anticipated to begin after financial close is reached for the Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnel procurement package.

Learn more about Procurement.

Stats and Facts*:

  • 27,000 people within walking distance to station
  • 5,100 customers will use the station during the busiest travel hour (3,000 getting on and 2,100 getting off the Ontario Line)
  • 2,400 transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 24,200 jobs in the area

*Forecast for the year 2041

Two-dimensional map of two future station entrance buildings at Queen Street West and Spadina Avenue and the surrounding area. One building is located on the northeast corner, and the second building is located on the southwest corner. The map depicts a rough outline of the projected station buildings’ footprints, anticipated station entrance points, permanent property requirements, and streetcar routes and stops. Note heritage attributes will be conserved where possible.

Click image to enlarge

Three-dimensional map of permanent property impacts at Queen and Spadina. A burnt-orange colour denotes properties that will be permanently impacted by Ontario Line construction, including the following: 165 Spadina Avenue on the northeast corner, and 443, 449, 451, 453 and 455 Queen Street West on the southwest corner. Note that heritage attributes will be preserved and conserved wherever possible. Note heritage attributes will be conserved where possible.

Permanent property impacts
Click image to enlarge

Basic three-dimensional map pictures the future state concept for station buildings are pictured in purple. No design details are pictured beyond the basic building structures.

Future state concept
Click image to enlarge

The station at Queen and Spadina will provide better access to the more than 42,200 jobs the area will accommodate by 2041.

Easy access to the Ontario Line will relieve crowding on the popular 501 Queen and 510 Spadina streetcar routes, with almost 3,800 streetcar riders transferring to and from the Ontario Line every day during the busiest travel hour. Current plans envision maintaining streetcar service in these areas throughout the duration of the project, though there might be times when service is re-routed or reduced to accommodate construction work.

Station entrances have been placed only a few steps away from streetcar stops on both the northeast and southwest corners of the intersection, allowing Ontario Line customers to walk from the subway platform directly to their preferred streetcar stop without having to cross the street.

More than 22,800 residents will be within a 10-minute walk of the new Ontario Line station by 2041. This station is in an area of the city where 7,900 households don’t currently own a car.

We know how important the heritage properties are in this area and we’re committed to featuring heritage attributes in our station designs to respect the important history and character of the neighbourhood. We will be engaging with communities on these plans as we gather more details.

Work is anticipated to begin after financial close is reached for the Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnel procurement package.

Learn more about Procurement.

Stats and Facts*:

  • 22,800people in walking distance to the station
  • 7,200 customers will use the station during the busiest travel hour (2,300 getting on and 4,900 getting off the Ontario Line)
  • 3,800 transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 42,200 jobs in the area

*Forecast for the year 2041

For more detail, visit Metrolinx News.
 

← Return to Neighbourhood Updates