> Built Heritage Resources & Cultural Heritage Landscapes - Lower Don Bridge and Don Yard | Metrolinx Engage

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Built Heritage Resources & Cultural Heritage Landscapes - Lower Don Bridge and Don Yard

← Return to Early Works: Lower Don Bridge and Don Yard Draft Report

Key Findings

  • A total of seven built heritage resources/cultural heritage landscapes (BHR/CHL) have been identified within the study area, including:
    • 385 Cherry Street – Cherry Street Interlocking Tower, a known Provincial Heritage Property of Provincial Significance;
    • Gooderham & Worts Distillery National Historic Site, also a potential Property of Provincial Significance and within a Heritage Conservation District;
    • Cherry Street Subway, a Metrolinx Provincial Heritage Property
    • The public space, former location of the first railway crossing of the Lower Don River, has been identified as a potential BHR/CHL. Heritage attributes include the 1856 abutment stones from the original railway crossing now used as seating stones and part of the retaining wall of the Bala Underpass;
    • 1930 Consumer’s Gas Bridge over the Lower Don River;
    • 1933 Eastern Avenue Bridge over the Lower Don River;
    • A Heritage Toronto Plaque in Corktown Common, located on the west side of the Bala Underpass, commemorating the former William Davies Co. pork packing plant once located on the site.

* The distance of 11.1 m from the Lower Don Bridge and Don Yard Early Works Project Footprint was included to account for potential vibration impacts to buildings extremely susceptible to vibration damage (including heritage buildings and their foundations)

* The distance of 11.1 m from the Lower Don Bridge and Don Yard Early Works Project Footprint was included to account for potential vibration impacts to buildings extremely susceptible to vibration damage (including heritage buildings and their foundations)

Potential Effects & Mitigation Measures

Potential Effects:

  • Potential impacts to the 1856 abutment stones in the public space on the west side of the Lower Don River. They may require removal/relocation to accommodate construction activities related to early works
  • No impacts as a result of construction vibration are anticipated. The Cherry Street Interlocking Tower was built to withstand vibration; however, the design vibration limits should be reviewed by a qualified specialist during the next phases of design.

Mitigation Measures:

  • For the public space related to the former location of the first railway crossing over the Don River, on the west side of the Lower Don River, consult with City of Toronto Heritage Planning to determine and obtain any approvals or permits required for physical impacts to the space as planning progresses.
    • If the 1856 abutment stones can remain in place during early works activities, install protective measures such as box or fence hoarding.
    • If the removal/relocation of the 1856 abutment stones is required prior to construction, mark the location of each 1856 abutment stone on the Detailed Design Plan and determine an appropriate removal plan and storage location. Remove 1856 abutment stone(s) prior to early works activities and reinstate afterward in the same location, if feasible.

Located at 385 Cherry Street, on the east side of Cherry Street immediately north of the Don Yard GO Facility, Cherry Street Interlocking Tower is a Heritage Property of Provincial Significance. The building is unique in Ontario as one of a set of three towers designed and constructed expressly for the housing and operation of a railway interlocking machine. It was designed by J.W. Orrock, Chief Engineer of Buildings for the Canadian Pacific Railway. </br>Source: Google “Streetview”, 2019. http://maps.google.com

Located at 385 Cherry Street, on the east side of Cherry Street immediately north of the Don Yard GO Facility, Cherry Street Interlocking Tower is a Heritage Property of Provincial Significance. The building is unique in Ontario as one of a set of three towers designed and constructed expressly for the housing and operation of a railway interlocking machine. It was designed by J.W. Orrock, Chief Engineer of Buildings for the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Source: Google “Streetview”, 2019. http://maps.google.com

1856 abutment stones along the Lower Don Trail. Source: Metrolinx, 2020.

1856 abutment stones along the Lower Don Trail.
Source: Metrolinx, 2020.

← Return to Early Works: Lower Don Bridge and Don Yard Draft Report

Submissions are closed.