> Yonge North Subway Extension LIVE - October 20, 2021 | Metrolinx Engage

Yonge North Subway Extension LIVE - October 20, 2021

On October 20, 2021, Metrolinx hosted a presentation and live question-and-answer session with members of the Yonge North Subway Extension project team to share updates on the progress of environmental studies that inform planning and design work for the project. The panel of Metrolinx experts answered the top-voted questions submitted by participants through our interactive online platform. The panel also took questions from community members who called in to the meeting. The topics included the latest plans for the project, tunneling, and plans for future public input sessions.

You can find written answers to these questions and others we didn’t get to below. If you weren’t able to join us, the video recording is available for you to watch any time.

 

 

Virtual Open House – October 20, 2021 Outstanding Questions

What is the distance between the north platform of Bridge Station and the south platform of High Tech Station? Why are stations placed so close together but nothing between Clarke and Bridge?

The stations on the northern section of the extension are placed the way they are to serve the most people in the future, making it faster and easier for riders to use the subway and connect to transit services across the region, and to better support growth while curbing local traffic congestion.

Bridge and High Tech stations will support York Region’s growth plans for the Langstaff Gateway and Richmond Hill Centre urban grow centres, which have been in place for many years in response to the demand for housing and employment opportunities in the region. Since those areas are expected to grow significantly in the years to come, these stations will help make sure any growth is sustainable by contributing a large portion of the riders that will use the subway extension.

Located between Highway 7 and Highway 407, Bridge Station will create vital connections between the subway and the Richmond Hill GO line, as well as GO bus, Viva Bus Rapid Transit and local bus services that run along the two major highways. It’s also worth noting that the station at High Tech Road would put the subway within walking distance for more than half of the residents expected to live in the Richmond Hill Centre area by 2041.

We are exploring opportunities with our project partners to include additional stations

Why is there a Hightech station right after Langstaff GO station - These two stations are so close! Don’t see the point of having both of them.

The areas around Bridge and High Tech stations are planned to grow significantly and will contribute a large portion of the extension’s riders. Located between Highway 7 and Highway 407, Bridge Station will connect the subway and the Richmond Hill GO train line through Langstaff GO station, as well create vital connections between GO bus, Viva Bus Rapid Transit and local bus services that run along the two major highways. It’s also worth noting that the station at High Tech Road would put the subway within walking distance for more than half of the residents expected to live in the Richmond Hill Centre area by 2041.

Why are you so obsessed with Bridge Station? It's clear that Metrolinx is in the pocket of land developers who want to build giant condo towers along Yonge Street and Hwy 7. In cancelling Cummer and Royal Orchard stations, but insisting that both Bridge and High Tech stations MUST be kept, you are sacrificing the interests of existing residents in favour of potential future condos

Growing communities thrive with the right transit solutions in place. The latest plans for the Yonge North Subway Extension put two stations at the heart of Langstaff Gateway and Richmond Hill Centre, an area that is set to become a vibrant regional hub where people will live and work.

Serving this growing community with convenient options to use rapid transit will be good for everybody in York Region. Our plan will bring the many people who will live near Bridge and High Tech stations within a 10-minute walk of rapid transit.

The proposed transit hub at Highway 7 and Highway 407 will conveniently connect as many as six future and existing regional and rapid transit services, including the Richmond Hill GO train line. Bridge Station will give customers new travel options that will allow them to tap into the entire regional transit network.

We’re exploring opportunities with our project partners that could support Cummer and Royal Orchard stations as the analysis is refined.

What law states that Metrolinx cannot tunnel under a cemetery? I Believe the same law applies to my home. Why are my “sensitivities” & rights ignored?

There is no law that states we cannot tunnel under a cemetery, however our goal when we plan and design large projects like this is to minimize impacts as much as possible, and there are unique challenges we face no matter where we build. Through our analysis, we found that running the subway tunnels below Holy Cross Cemetery would have made it necessary to relocate hundreds of burial sites since the tunnels would not be deep enough in this area. This could have affected thousands of people and added significantly to project timelines because we would need to identify, locate and get in touch with any next of kin to notify them of our plans before any burials are moved. With those issues in mind, planning and design teams advanced the analysis of the northern section of the route immediately after the Initial Business Case (IBC) was drafted and submitted for endorsement by the Metrolinx Board. The refined route proposal presented alongside the IBC is the recommended path forward, and will be analyzed further in the Preliminary Design Business Case, which will guide the next phase of the project.

We are confident that we can effectively manage any project impacts through robust planning, design work and community consultations. The precise route of the Yonge North Subway Extension will evolve as planning work continues. We expect to have more detailed information in the coming months as further design work is refined and we move forward with environmental assessments, but our goal will be to minimize impacts to communities as much as possible as we deliver major transit benefits to them. We’re committed to sharing the latest updates of our plans with the community.

Approved Operating Plan - Can you share with us the detailed operating plan with funding of Option 3 and the comparison of a detailed operating plan for other options? Have you conducted research from local residents, councillors, and businesses in the area to support this endeavor? could you please share your results.

Information on the operating concept and funding for each of the options studied can be found in the Initial Business Case in Chapter 6 – Financial Case and Chapter 7 – Deliverability and Operations Case.

Input from municipal and regional planners informed the development of the Initial Business Case and supplementary analysis. The insight we gathered from our partners helped us thoroughly understand the current land use characteristics, growth planned in each community served by the extension, and how that development will affect transit needs in the future. We’ll be working closely with our partners as the design and planning process moves forward.

The plans we recently released in the Initial Business Case are just the first step of a planning process that includes robust and frequent conversations with communities. It provides recommendations that are backed up by evidence to make sure the proposal we’re bringing forward for consultation is something we can confidently deliver.

We will continue to work with communities, municipalities and other partners such as the TTC and York Region Transit on further development of the operating plan for the extension as the project design and development progress.

Why do you keep saying questions ? We are not asking questions! We want the subway on Yonge not under our houses! How tough is that for you to understand ? This is a plan cooked up by incompetent government "planners" who will not be affected where they live !

The tunnels along the Yonge North Subway Extension will be built to strict design and engineering standards and will be much deeper underground than in many areas of Toronto’s existing subway network. The bottoms of the tunnels – where trains pass over the tracks – will be at least 20 metres deep in the Royal Orchard community – roughly as deep as a six-storey building is tall. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago.

The detailed studies we’re doing right now will help us make sure we put all the right noise and vibration solutions in place so neighbourhoods remain sought-after places to live in. We are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs, like we do on all of our projects and we’re looking at how we can build the subway even deeper, and under fewer homes in northern section of the route.

What is your definition of “consult”? Both Vaughan and Markham councils have opposed Option 3, School Boards oppose Option 3, residents oppose option 3. If Metrolinx doesn’t listen to vested participants in this alignment, don’t say you are consulting. You are telling.

The plans we recently released in the Initial Business Case are just the first step of a planning process that includes robust and frequent conversations with communities. It provides recommendations that are backed up by evidence to make sure the proposal we’re bringing forward for consultation is something we can confidently deliver.

Our goal is to ensure we bring transit to the most people while limiting impacts on homes, businesses and communities as a whole. Once we identify the path a transit line will take, we’re able to then target our outreach to start discussing any impacts and how we’ll solve for them. That’s what we’re doing now, and there will be many more discussions as we move forward together on this important project.

We are eager to connect with you throughout the life of the project so that you can share your input with us.

Why should we listen to you when you're not listening to us? Vaughan and Markham governments both oppose Option 3. Why are you on the side of the developers instead of the people?

The proposal that is moving forward will help people all over York Region because it means we can include more stations along the subway extension, providing more congestion relief to existing transit lines and roadways. If we were to follow the Option 1 or Option 2, Metrolinx would only be able to build three stations.

Running the subway along the CN rail corridor in the northern end of the extension will create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth. It will help us complete the project sooner than if the subway was tunneled the entire length of the route and also protects for a future northern extension of the subway along a railway corridor that already exists.

As we’ve stated, we are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Why did you call a meeting in conflict with YRegion Trans? Thornhill is very concerned poor communication. I have outstanding questions since April 2021. Why did you schedule this meeting in conflict with the York Region Transportation meeting on the same date? Please answer all of my questions previously asked. Why don't you be honest with us?

We know that October is a busy time for public meetings and that our virtual open house conflicted with a few public meetings on October 20th. To ensure people can still access the presentation, the virtual open house was recorded and posted on our website. You also still have the opportunity to ask us questions any time through Metrolinx Engage, via email [email protected] or by phone (416-202-7000).

What are alternative alignments that Metrolinx is looking at? Provide a map. What are alternative alignments that Metrolinx is looking at? Provide a map.

We are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve and we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper, and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Our goal will be to minimize impacts to communities as much as possible as we deliver major transit benefits to them. We’re committed to sharing the latest updates of our plans with the community when our analysis is complete.

If Vaughan Council, Markham Council, and School board have all opposed Option 3, how does Metrolinx with good conscience, continue with Opt 3?

The tunnels along the Yonge North Subway Extension will be built to strict design and engineering standards and will be much deeper underground than in many areas of Toronto’s existing subway network. The bottoms of the tunnels – where trains pass over the tracks – will be at least 20 metres deep in the Royal Orchard community – roughly as deep as a six-storey building is tall. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago. As we’ve stated, we are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Why are alternatives to option 3 being ignored. Why, with no votes from city councils, concern from CN and other transit experts, as well as area political leaders and residents, is this unethical design choice being pursued while other technical ethical solutions are available. A simple cheap idea is not always ethical or sensible. Catering to developers above long term residents is wrong.

The approach we’re taking will help people all over York Region because it means we can include more stations along the subway extension, providing more congestion relief to existing transit lines and roadways. If we were to follow the other routes studied through the Initial Business Case, Metrolinx would only be able to build three stations. Running the subway along the CN rail corridor in the northern end of the extension will create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth.

The tunnels along the Yonge North Subway Extension will be built to strict design and engineering standards and will be much deeper underground than in many areas of Toronto’s existing subway network. The bottoms of the tunnels – where trains pass over the tracks – will be at least 20 metres deep in the Royal Orchard community – roughly as deep as a six-storey building is tall. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago.

As we’ve stated, we are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Why is Metrolinx continuing to pursue Option 3? With all the opposition, why is Metrolinx still continuing with Option 3, now rebranded as the "Reference Alignment"? No one is in support of this Option with shallow tunneling under houses and Schools. This includes everyone in the established Royal Orchard community, Markham Council, and Vaughn Council. Keep the Yonge Subway under Yonge St!

The approach we’re taking will help people all over York Region because it means we can include more stations along the subway extension, providing more congestion relief to existing transit lines and roadways. If we were to follow the other routes studied through the Initial Business Case, Metrolinx would only be able to build three stations. Running the subway along the CN rail corridor in the northern end of the extension will create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth.

The tunnels along the Yonge North Subway Extension will be built to strict design and engineering standards and will be much deeper underground than in many areas of Toronto’s existing subway network. The bottoms of the tunnels – where trains pass over the tracks – will be at least 20 metres deep in the Royal Orchard community – roughly as deep as a six-storey building is tall. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago.

As we’ve stated, we are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Given the massive opposition from so may sources, why is "option 3" still in your plan?

The approach we’re taking will help people all over York Region because it means we can include more stations along the subway extension, providing more congestion relief to existing transit lines and roadways. If we were to follow the other routes studied through the Initial Business Case, Metrolinx would only be able to build three stations. Running the subway along the CN rail corridor in the northern end of the extension will create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth.

The tunnels along the Yonge North Subway Extension will be built to strict design and engineering standards and will be much deeper underground than in many areas of Toronto’s existing subway network. The bottoms of the tunnels – where trains pass over the tracks – will be at least 20 metres deep in the Royal Orchard community – roughly as deep as a six-storey building is tall. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago.

As we’ve stated, we are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Please provide the proposed Option 3 route as the geotechnical study is underway along this route. Please do not beat around the bush to provide the answer that you have.

The investigative drilling work currently underway in Royal Orchard will help us better understand soil and groundwater conditions in the area. This will inform the planning and design stage for the Yonge North Subway Extension as we actively explore refinements and improvements to our initial designs to tunnel deeper and under fewer properties. Ultimately, we want to ensure we bring transit to the most people while limiting impacts on communities as a whole.

It is also worth noting we’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions for the project that are proven to work. A big benefit is that they’ll be based on modern and up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago. The detailed studies we’re doing right now will help us make sure we put all the right noise and vibration solutions in place so neighbourhoods along the route stay sought-after places to live in.

We would like to know the exact location from the point where the line exits Yonge to where it meets up with the existing line.

The updated route curves away from Yonge Street and runs underground to the proposed subway tunnel portal south of Langstaff Road. The precise location of the tunnel portal will be confirmed through further planning and design work. We will have more details to share as we complete updated environmental studies for the project. We expect to issue a draft environmental report early next year.

What exactly are the benefits of Option 3? You constantly talk about the benefits but I have never seen nor heard what those benefits are. Who benefits from this option?

By running the route of the subway at ground level within the existing CN railway corridor, we are able to build four stations along the subway extension. If we were to follow the original route, only three stations could be built within the project’s funding envelope. This approach reduces the need for complex and costly construction of tunnels and underground stations, and will help us complete the project sooner than if the subway was tunneled the entire length of the route. It will also help us create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is set to become a vibrant regional hub where people live and work.

This project will be critical in supporting York Region’s growth plans, particularly for the Richmond Hill Centre and Langstaff Gateway urban growth centres. We know this because our municipal and regional partners have been planning for it for many years in response to the demand for more housing and employment opportunities in the region. Thanks to the Yonge North Subway Extension, it is expected that 26,000 more residents and 22,900 more jobs will be within a 10-minute walk of a new station within the next two decades, ensuring that any growth is sustainable. These growth plans need to be supported by a strong foundation of fast, reliable rapid transit with convenient connections to the regional transportation network that will keep people moving and give them more options to move around – whether those people are new to the community or have lived there for many years.

We are working to make sure after the extension opens, there is no significant difference in noise and vibration levels in the communities it runs beneath. We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago.

The detailed studies we’re doing right now will help us make sure we put all the right noise and vibration solutions in place so neighbourhoods remain sought-after places to live in. We are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs, like we do on all of our projects and we’re looking at how we can build the subway even deeper, and under fewer homes in northern section of the route.

Provide the detailed proposed route - Option 3. We have heard that you have disclosed to certain parties (school board, City) the final route of the tunnels and map. And you are repeatedly telling us (residents) that the route is not finalized though you are digging boreholes in a premeditated manner. Why are you not disclosing the route to residents of Royal Orchard community?

The investigative drilling we’re doing in the northern segment of the route will inform our planning and design work as we look at how we can build the subway even deeper, and under fewer homes in the Royal Orchard community. We want the subway extension to be the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That’s why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs, like we do on all of our projects. We look forward to providing an update on this work in the near future.

What are the benefits of Option 3, namely realigning part of the subway from Yonge Street east to the railway

The route we’re moving forward with allows us to build a fourth station within the $5.6 billion funding envelope because it minimizes the amount of tunneling needed. With the other underground options, only three stations could be built.

Running subway trains along the existing CN rail corridor in the northern end of the route makes it possible to build that fourth station – and that’s why we need to run a tunnel from Yonge Street to connect to it. This approach also protects for a simpler and less costly further extension of the subway in the future.

It’s important to note that we’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions for the project that are proven to work. A big benefit is that they’ll be based on modern and up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago. The detailed studies we’re doing right now will help us make sure we put all the right noise and vibration solutions in place so neighbourhoods along the route stay sought-after places to live in.

What about leaving Yonge at Centre directly to the CN Rail? Where you are already prepared to leave Yonge Street at Royal Orchard, would you consider instead leaving Yonge right at Centre Street, crossing under the golf course directly to the CN Rail? This way only a handful of residences would be affected - also, might Centre Street not be considered a logical station location?

We closely studied leaving Yonge street at Centre as suggested. Our analysis shows there is lower potential for growth near Centre Street compared to the other potential stations because it is located within the boundaries of heritage conservation districts in Markham and Vaughan. Leaving Yonge Street at Centre would also affect a similar number of single-family residential properties as the preferred route and presented fewer benefits, as it would increase travel time for riders.

The route we’re moving forward with allows us to build a fourth station within the $5.6 billion funding envelope because it minimizes the amount of tunneling needed. With the other underground options, only three stations could be built. Running the subway along the CN rail corridor in the northern end of the extension will also create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth.

Why not continue on Yonge Street? Common sense and EVERY concerned group including City councils, neighbourhood and residents groups and business groups ALL strongly want the subway extension to stay under Yonge Street. This was also the original plan for decades. Why change to something that causes greater disruption and no benefits?

The approach we’re taking will help people all over York Region because it means we can include more stations along the subway extension, providing more congestion relief to existing transit lines and roadways. If we were to follow the other routes studied through the Initial Business Case, Metrolinx would only be able to build three stations. Running the subway at surface level along the CN rail corridor in the northern end of the extension will also create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth.

This project will be critical in supporting York Region’s growth plans, particularly for the Richmond Hill Centre and Langstaff Gateway urban growth centres. We know this because our municipal and regional partners have been planning for it for many years in response to the demand for more housing and employment opportunities in the region. Thanks to the Yonge North Subway Extension, it is expected that 26,000 more residents and 22,900 more jobs will be within a 10-minute walk of a new station within the next two decades, ensuring that any growth is sustainable. These growth plans need to be supported by a strong foundation of fast, reliable rapid transit with convenient connections to the regional transportation network that will keep people moving and give them more options to move around – whether those people are new to the community or have lived there for many years.

As we’ve stated, we are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper, and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Option 3 - You have never tunneled under housing. Why pick the most complicated route? Obviously there is another reason. A developer will benefit.

Subways around the world, including in the Greater Toronto Area, travel underneath homes and businesses all the time. Approximately 74 per cent of the current TTC system is underground today. The tunnels along the Yonge North Subway Extension will be built to strict design and engineering standards and will be much deeper underground than in many areas of Toronto’s existing subway network. The bottoms of the tunnels – where trains pass over the tracks – will be at least 20 metres deep in the Royal Orchard community – roughly as deep as a six-storey building is tall. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

If we were to tunnel the entire extension, we would not be able to include a fourth station. Running the subway along the CN rail corridor in the northern end of the extension will also create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth.

This project will be critical in supporting York Region’s growth plans, particularly for the Richmond Hill Centre and Langstaff Gateway urban growth centres. We know this because our municipal and regional partners have been planning for it for many years in response to the demand for more housing and employment opportunities in the region. Thanks to the Yonge North Subway Extension, it is expected that 26,000 more residents and 22,900 more jobs will be within a 10-minute walk of a new station within the next two decades, ensuring that any growth is sustainable. These growth plans need to be supported by a strong foundation of fast, reliable rapid transit with convenient connections to the regional transportation network that will keep people moving and give them more options to move around – whether those people are new to the community or have lived there for many years.

As we’ve stated, we are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper, and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Will you be tunneling under St Anthony and Baythorn PS in a proposed alignment?

The precise route of the Yonge North Subway Extension will evolve as planning work continues. We expect to have more detailed information in the near future as further design work is refined and we move forward with environmental assessments, but our goal will be to minimize impacts to communities as much as possible as we deliver major transit benefits to them. We’re committed to sharing the latest updates of our plans with the community, and that includes how we’ll help manage any impacts during construction and beyond.

What his the real reason you have decided to adopt Option #3 ? This is obviously a benefit to large developers and totally detrimental to the living Royal Orchard residents. Notice I said living as you have been warned off going under the deceased at Holy Cross ! I cannot believe the shell game you people are trying to foist upon us. We are living citizens in Canada a supposedly democratic country.

Our goal when we plan and design large projects like this is to minimize impacts as much as possible, and there are unique challenges we face no matter where we build. Through our analysis, we found that running the subway tunnels below Holy Cross Cemetery would have made it necessary to relocate hundreds of burial sites since the tunnels would not be deep enough in this area. This could have affected thousands of people and added significantly to project timelines because we would need to identify, locate and get in touch with any next of kin to notify them of our plans before any burials are moved. With those issues in mind, planning and design teams advanced the analysis of the northern section of the route immediately after the Initial Business Case (IBC) was drafted and submitted for endorsement by the Metrolinx Board. The refined route proposal presented alongside the IBC is the recommended path forward, and will be analyzed further in the Preliminary Design Business Case, which will guide the next phase of the project.

We are confident that we can effectively manage any project impacts through robust planning, design work and community consultations. The precise route of the Yonge North Subway Extension will evolve as planning work continues. We expect to have more detailed information in the coming months as further design work is refined and we move forward with environmental assessments, but our goal will be to minimize impacts to communities as much as possible as we deliver major transit benefits to them. We’re committed to sharing the latest updates of our plans with the community.

Why not tunnel under Holy Cross if tunnels so deep? I have been advised that in a recent reply to a complaint by a taxpayer that Metrolinx has assured her that the disruptions to families and homes will be NIL, due to the depths of the tunnels and the modern technology that will be used. If that is the case, then why can't you tunnel under the cemetery where no one sleeps or lives?

Through our analysis, we found that running the subway tunnels below Holy Cross Cemetery would have made it necessary to relocate hundreds of burial sites since the tunnels would not be deep enough in this area. This could have affected thousands of people and added significantly to project timelines because we would need to identify, locate and get in touch with any next of kin to notify them of our plans before any burials are moved. With those issues in mind, planning and design teams advanced the analysis of the northern section of the route immediately after the Initial Business Case (IBC) was drafted and submitted for endorsement by the Metrolinx Board. The refined route proposal presented alongside the IBC is the recommended path forward, and will be analyzed further in the Preliminary Design Business Case, which will guide the next phase of the project.

It’s important to note that we’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions for the project that are proven to work. A big benefit is that they’ll be based on modern and up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago. The detailed studies we’re doing right now will help us make sure we put all the right noise and vibration solutions in place so neighbourhoods along the route stay sought-after places to live in.

Where do we pick up our Holy Cross Veto exemptions? I am very sensitive. So are my neighbours. I have asthma, am a cancer survivor and suffer from ptsd. I want a veto from the subway going under, cross, through or behind my house. Who do I call?

Our goal when we plan and design large projects like this is to minimize impacts as much as possible, and there are unique challenges we face no matter where we build. Through our analysis, we found that running the subway tunnels below Holy Cross Cemetery would have made it necessary to relocate hundreds of burial sites since the tunnels would not be deep enough in this area. This could have affected thousands of people and added significantly to project timelines because we would need to identify, locate and get in touch with any next of kin to notify them of our plans before any burials are moved. With those issues in mind, planning and design teams advanced the analysis of the northern section of the route immediately after the Initial Business Case (IBC) was drafted and submitted for endorsement by the Metrolinx Board. The refined route proposal presented alongside the IBC is the recommended path forward, and will be analyzed further in the Preliminary Design Business Case, which will guide the next phase of the project.

We are confident that we can effectively manage any project impacts through robust planning, design work and community consultations. The precise route of the Yonge North Subway Extension will evolve as planning work continues. We expect to have more detailed information in the coming months as further design work is refined and we move forward with environmental assessments, but our goal will be to minimize impacts to communities as much as possible as we deliver major transit benefits to them.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago.

We are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper, and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans and we’re committed to sharing the latest updates of our plans with the community.

What difficulties are posed in using cemetery property for subway/road? What is Process in moving graves?

Through our analysis, we found that running the subway tunnels below Holy Cross Cemetery would have made it necessary to relocate hundreds of burial sites since the tunnels would not be deep enough in this area. This could have affected thousands of people and added significantly to project timelines because we would need to identify, locate and get in touch with any next of kin to notify them of our plans before any burials are moved. With those issues in mind, planning and design teams advanced the analysis of the northern section of the route immediately after the Initial Business Case (IBC) was drafted and submitted for endorsement by the Metrolinx Board. The refined route proposal presented alongside the IBC is the recommended path forward, and will be analyzed further in the Preliminary Design Business Case, which will guide the next phase of the project.

It’s important to note that we’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions for the project that are proven to work. A big benefit is that they’ll be based on modern and up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago. The detailed studies we’re doing right now will help us make sure we put all the right noise and vibration solutions in place so neighbourhoods along the route stay sought-after places to live in.

Why are deceased people more important than us?If you went up Yonge you would not have any of these issues! Boy double depth burials get more weight than we living citizens. Thanks Stephen!

Through our analysis, we found that running the subway tunnels below Holy Cross Cemetery would have made it necessary to relocate hundreds of burial sites since the tunnels would not be deep enough in this area. This could have affected thousands of people and added significantly to project timelines because we would need to identify, locate and get in touch with any next of kin to notify them of our plans before any burials are moved. With those issues in mind, planning and design teams advanced the analysis of the northern section of the route immediately after the Initial Business Case (IBC) was drafted and submitted for endorsement by the Metrolinx Board. The refined route proposal presented alongside the IBC is the recommended path forward, and will be analyzed further in the Preliminary Design Business Case, which will guide the next phase of the project.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago.

We are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper, and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans and we’re committed to sharing the latest updates of our plans with the community.

How does the final decision get made? Who is the final decision maker regarding which option is finalized? Please be specific as to how that process will work.

Final decisions on project scope, including the route of the subway extension and station locations, will be made by the Province of Ontario, in consultation with government partners. These decisions will be informed by updated environmental studies, feedback from communities, and detailed technical work done by Metrolinx.

Has CN Rail provided permission/access to corridor for subway?

We are in discussions with CN about our plans for the Yonge North Subway Extension as planning and design for the project continues. Metrolinx has a longstanding relationship with CN – we share rail corridor throughout our existing GO network, and have done so for years. We’re confident we will be able to effectively work together to move this important project forward.

Knowing the route is important, but I still think moving off Yonge is a shortsighted decision. These are 100-year calls that are being made and the original plan of keeping the subway under Yonge St is still a better long term solution. For full disclosure I am not impacted by this route change, but I still think it is the wrong call for the future

The route we’re moving forward with allows us to build a fourth station within the $5.6 billion funding envelope because it minimizes the amount of tunneling needed. With the other underground options, only three stations could be built.

Running subway trains along the existing CN rail corridor in the northern end of the route makes it possible to build that fourth station – and that’s why we need to run a tunnel from Yonge Street to connect to it. By aligning the subway at surface level in a railway corridor that already exists, we can also protect for an easier and less costly extension of the subway further north in the future. This approach will also create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth.

This project will be critical in supporting York Region’s growth plans, particularly for the Richmond Hill Centre and Langstaff Gateway urban growth centres. We know this because our municipal and regional partners have been planning for it for many years in response to the demand for more housing and employment opportunities in the region. Thanks to the Yonge North Subway Extension, it is expected that 26,000 more residents and 22,900 more jobs will be within a 10-minute walk of a new station within the next two decades, ensuring that any growth is sustainable. These growth plans need to be supported by a strong foundation of fast, reliable rapid transit with convenient connections to the regional transportation network that will keep people moving and give them more options to move around – whether those people are new to the community or have lived there for many years.

As we’ve stated, we are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. That is why we are actively exploring refinements and improvements to our initial designs. Specifically, we’re looking at how we can go even deeper, and under fewer homes, in the northern end of the extension. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Why not let taxpayers vote: save $$ or do not hurt local res?I am a York region taxpayer. I am told that to keep the subway on Yonge is more expensive. I don't live around Yonge area. But I don't want to save my tax dollars at the expense of local residents. Residents will lose much more over the years than is saved of my taxes. Why does YNSE find it acceptable? Why not to let taxpayers vote on it?

The plans we released in the Initial Business Case are just the first step of a planning process that includes robust and frequent conversations with communities. The business case provides recommendations that are backed up by evidence to make sure the proposal we’re bringing forward for consultation is something we can confidently deliver.

Our goal is to ensure we bring transit to the most people while limiting impacts on homes, businesses and communities as a whole. Once we identify the path a transit line will take, we’re able to then target our outreach to start discussing any impacts and how we’ll solve for them. That’s what we’re doing now, and there will be many, many more discussions as we move forward together on this important project.

The Promenade area is the hub of Thornhill. Obviously the subway curving from Yonge and Steeles to Bathurst and Centre and then to Yonge and Highway 7 is more costly, but shouldn’t the subway go to where people live, work and shop?

Communities are at the centre of our decision-making. Any decisions we make on the route of the subway and the location of stations are in the interest of improving the customer experience, increasing access to transit, maximizing ridership, achieving travel time savings, and creating better access to jobs. These criteria are balanced by cost and other important community considerations.

Steeles, Bridge and High Tech stations were determined to be essential for maximizing the benefits of the project. These stations will significantly improve access to frequent rapid transit and support the growth of the neighbourhoods they serve. Clark Station will offer riders seamless connections to the planned extension of the Viva Orange bus rapid transit line, which serves communities along Highway 7.

We will continue to keep your community at the heart of our planning process as we advance this important project.

Exactly when is the final route to be chosen and publicized?

The precise route of the Yonge North Subway Extension will evolve as planning work continues. We expect to have more detailed information in the in the near future as further design work is refined and we move forward with environmental assessments, but our goal will be to minimize impacts to communities as much as possible as we deliver major transit benefits to them. We’re committed to sharing the latest updates of our plans with the community, and that includes how we’ll help manage any impacts during construction and beyond.

Why not a underground bus terminal at Steeles station? In the initial conceptual plans, it showed that Steeles station would have an extensive underground bus terminal that would both serve TTC and a number of YRT services. It also showed in the plans that this bus terminal would easily connect to the proposed Steeles BRT. What happened to this plan? Building a surface terminal would hinder development

The number of transit connections expected at the Steeles Station hub calls for a significant amount of space for buses to safely move around the terminal to pick up and drop off passengers.

Our early analysis showed that an area roughly half a kilometer long and almost as wide as Steeles Avenue (the pavement spans four lanes at Yonge Street) would need to be hollowed out, two levels below the surface. The excavation needed would be a significant increase to the cost of the project, along with extra expenses to relocate utilities from beneath the intersection.

The switch to plans for a street-level bus terminal also eliminates the need for a system that draws fresh air from the surface to circulate underground. Accommodating those ventilation requirements would have contributed to the cost of building and operating the station. The design concept and requirements for the bus terminal are being refined based on the needs identified by the TTC, York Region Transit, and other local stakeholders. We are seeking input from the TTC and City of Toronto and will share more details about the Steeles Station transit hub when the Preliminary Design Business Case is finalized.

Why not create an exclusive bus lane system - Yonge Street is wide enough to permit exclusive rapid bus lanes. This could be built far quicker than underground subways and would be far less costly to the lowly taxpayers. Any consideration for this idea??

This Yonge North Subway Extension will be critical in supporting York Region’s growth plans, particularly for the Richmond Hill Centre and Langstaff Gateway urban growth centres. We know this because our municipal and regional partners have been planning for it for many years in response to the demand for more housing and employment opportunities in the region. Thanks to the Yonge North Subway Extension, it is expected that 26,000 more residents and 22,900 more jobs will be within a 10-minute walk of a new station within the next two decades, ensuring that any growth is sustainable. These growth plans need to be supported by a strong foundation of fast, reliable rapid transit with convenient connections to the regional transportation network that will keep people moving and give them more options to move around – whether those people are new to the community or have lived there for many years

Extending subway service through Vaughan, Markham and Richmond Hill will bring a world-class level of convenience and a better quality of life to the communities it serves. It will provide faster, easier access to downtown Toronto, York Region and all points in between. The Yonge North Subway Extension will reduce the time it takes to travel from the Yonge Street and Langstaff Road area to downtown Toronto by as much as 22 minutes – going from 70 minutes today to 48 minutes with the extension. We know that higher-order transit like this is transformative in so many ways. The Yonge North Subway Extension will expand travel options along York Region’s Viva bus rapid transit lines and provide more Line 1 subway riders with a seamless journey. These benefits will also provide better access to jobs and offset traffic congestion, saving more than 4,800 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions annually, as drivers get out from behind the wheel in favour of using the subway.

Why not create exclusive bus lanes instead of an underground subway? The cost savings would be gargantuan (a blessing for tax payers), it could be started and completed in far less time than going underground, and Yonge Street is certainly wide enough to accommodate the exclusive bus lanes. Eglinton is an absolute nightmare.

This Yonge North Subway Extension will be critical in supporting York Region’s growth plans, particularly for the Richmond Hill Centre and Langstaff Gateway urban growth centres. We know this because our municipal and regional partners have been planning for it for many years in response to the demand for more housing and employment opportunities in the region. Thanks to the Yonge North Subway Extension, it is expected that 26,000 more residents and 22,900 more jobs will be within a 10-minute walk of a new station within the next two decades, ensuring that any growth is sustainable. These growth plans need to be supported by a strong foundation of fast, reliable rapid transit with convenient connections to the regional transportation network that will keep people moving and give them more options to move around – whether those people are new to the community or have lived there for many years

Extending subway service through Vaughan, Markham and Richmond Hill will bring a world-class level of convenience and a better quality of life to the communities it serves. It will provide faster, easier access to downtown Toronto, York Region and all points in between. The Yonge North Subway Extension will reduce the time it takes to travel from the Yonge Street and Langstaff Road area to downtown Toronto by as much as 22 minutes – going from 70 minutes today to 48 minutes with the extension. We know that higher-order transit like this is transformative in so many ways. The Yonge North Subway Extension will expand travel options along York Region’s Viva bus rapid transit lines and provide more Line 1 subway riders with a seamless journey. These benefits will also provide better access to jobs and offset traffic congestion, saving more than 4,800 tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions annually, as drivers get out from behind the wheel in favour of using the subway.

Why are we building this extension anyway ? - A one line tunnel, by 2030+, will not handle the rider load ! Probably 1,000,000+ NEW residents in this area in 10 years ! Hwy. 407/ Yonge is slated to be a confluence for traffic and passengers for the subway. We will need 2 lines ? More tunneling under houses? We're at risk, and no Royal Orchard station ? Am I correct, or nuts?

Extending subway service through Vaughan, Markham and Richmond Hill will bring a world-class level of convenience and a better quality of life to the communities it serves. It will provide faster, easier access to downtown Toronto, York Region and all points in between.

We know that higher-order transit like this is transformative in so many ways. The Yonge North Subway Extension will expand travel options along York Region’s Viva bus rapid transit lines and provide more Line 1 subway riders with a seamless journey. These benefits will also provide better access to jobs and offset traffic congestion as drivers get out from behind the wheel in favour of using the subway.

The Yonge North Subway Extension will put a combined 94,100 riders on the subway daily. By 2041, this would bring 26,000 more people within walking distance of the new stations and would give 26,000 people access to rapid transit compared to a scenario where the extension was not built.

In regard to Royal Orchard Station, we’re exploring opportunities with our project partners that could support additional stations as the analysis is refined.

In his market update letter the CEO of Infrastructure Ontario states when referring to the made-in-Ontario P3 programs that IO adapts and expands on its approaches “to suit the realities of a changing marketplace”. How have these realities impacted the YNSE? How will Metrolinx manage these changes? What effect will these changes have on price?

We’re taking the same approach to procurement on the Yonge North Subway Extension as we are on projects like the Scarborough Subway Extension and Eglinton Crosstown West Extension, where we will have separate contracts for different packages; for example for advance tunnelling and another for the stations, rails and systems needed for the subway. We are considering options for packaging those contracts as we aim to attract the highest interest from the market to create a more competitive procurement that will get the most benefits for taxpayers. We are constantly monitoring the market conditions to ensure our cost estimates and schedules are based on the best information available. We expect to issue a contract for advance tunnelling in the summer of 2023. The timing for procurement of the stations, rails, and systems contract will be provided in future market updates.

Splitting these major projects into separate packages of work ensures that contracts are a suitable and manageable size, which makes them more attractive to prospective bidders. This in turn helps to keep projects on schedule. Teams are still working to meet the initial timelines that would see the extension go into service in 2030, after the Ontario Line is up and running.

Why is there no planned stop for Yonge & Centre Street?

Our analysis shows there is lower potential for growth near Centre Street compared to the other confirmed and potential stations because Centre Street is located within the boundaries of heritage conservation districts in Markham and Vaughan.

Doesn't a station at Centre makes the most sense? How much are the rich folks living on Centre Street paying Metrolinx/ON to avoid building a station there?

Our analysis shows there is lower potential for growth near Centre Street compared to the other confirmed and potential stations because Centre street is located within the boundaries of heritage conservation districts in Markham and Vaughan.

All four stations that are included in the latest plans for the project were shown through our analysis to be essential to bring faster transit to more people. Steeles, Bridge and High Tech stations will significantly improve access to frequent rapid transit, providing easy connections to local and regional travel options that will help people move around the GTA and beyond. Clark Station will offer riders seamless connections to the planned extension of the Viva Orange bus rapid transit line, which serves communities along Highway 7.

We are working with our partners to explore opportunities that could support additional stations at Royal Orchard Boulevard and Cummer Avenue.

What is the status of possibly adding a fifth station? Is there still a possibility that a fifth station will be added? How likely is this scenario? Is Metrolinx actively working to make sure that we do have a fifth station on the line?

We are working with our partners to explore opportunities that could support additional stations at Royal Orchard Boulevard and Cummer Avenue.

At this time, we are developing the project based on the four confirmed stations. In parallel, we are advancing the planning of both Royal Orchard and Cummer stations to be prepared if funding for additional stations is approved.

How many stations are included and where? What is the difference between this extention compare with the existing line? Physical and technical?

The project includes four new stations, including a newly proposed transit hub at Highway 7 and Highway 407 (‘Bridge Station’) that will conveniently connect to as many as six future and existing regional transit lines, as well as local bus services.

A station at High Tech Road will serve future communities envisioned within the Richmond Hill Centre area.

A station at Steeles Avenue will connect with local bus routes that serve Toronto and York Region, as well as a future TTC rapid transit line proposed to connect communities along Steeles Avenue.

Clark Station will offer riders seamless connections to the planned extension of the Viva Orange bus rapid transit line, which serves communities along Highway 7.

One of the more noticeable and innovative changes in the updated plan is how the line will run at ground level in the northern part of the extension, linking up with the CN railway corridor in the area of Langstaff Road. Adjusting the route of the line in this area will better position the project to serve the Richmond Hill Centre and Langstaff Gateway urban growth centres, which are poised for significant development. Creating stronger connections here will mean better connections to transit, including the Richmond Hill GO train line, and less traffic congestion as communities grow.

This shift will also ensure the project can be built in less time by minimizing lengthy and disruptive excavations, in turn reducing inconveniences to neighbouring communities. The adjusted plans also protect for further extension of the line in the future by positioning the northern end of the project along an existing rail corridor.

Will there be any indoor bicycle storing facility? Indoor bicycle storing facility at stations allows passengers to store their bicycles more safely.

The next stage in planning for the Yonge North Subway Extension includes the release of the Preliminary Design Business Case (PDBC), which will further refine the project's design, route, and benefits. There will be bike parking, either indoor or outdoor, at every station and we are evaluating indoor parking at stations based on demand and available space.

The Yonge North Subway Extension has been designed to support vibrant urban development along the route that creates faster, easier connections to rapid transit so that people can get out from behind the wheel. Those connections include local transit routes, TTC bus service, York Region local and Viva express bus service, Richmond Hill GO service, Highway 407 GO bus service, access with PRESTO (which automatically applies transfers and gives the user the lowest cost of a ride), as well as active transportation like walking and cycling.

Disability access- Will the stations be accessible for seniors with walkers, canes, or possibly wheel chairs? Not all of the existing subway stations even now are accessible for any people with disabilities. Often escalators (the few that there are) are non-functioning.

The extension will meet or exceed all up-to-date accessibility standards.

Clark Station - Is Stn. on S. side (parking lot) or N. side (Auto garage)? as # of conflicting turns & stops differ. Could #23 alternative run short turn service only to & from Promenade?( S. of Clark, it is very close to Steeles & would eliminate 1 platform (space) @ Steeles). Orange needs longer platform.

Possible hi-rise housing & commerce on Clark E.?

The next stage in planning for the Yonge North Subway Extension includes the release of the Preliminary Design Business Case (PDBC), which will further refine the project's design, route, and benefits. The design for Clark Station will be evaluated in more depth through the PDBC.

Wayfinding Design Standard – Will Metrolinx be using their own wayfinding design standards on the extension stations? If so, won't it be jarring for passengers to have one wayfinding standard south of Finch Station and a different standard north of Finch?

Metrolinx and our transit partners across the region are working together through the Regional Transit Wayfinding Harmonization project. The goal of the initiative is to improve the consistency of wayfinding across the region to make your commute better and easier.

Proximity of subway & rail lines. How will accidents & movement conflicts be handled /mitigated?

The subway will run within the CN railway corridor on its own dedicated tracks that will be completely separate from other rail operations. Some adjustments to the CN rail track may be required, in addition to placing the subway track through the corridor. Any improvements needed to the CN rail corridor will be determined through our ongoing discussions with CN.

Starting date of construction - completion date. I've never heard any reference to an approximate starting date of construction, or a completion date. Can you enlighten us to an approximate date for both?

The planned date to begin the main construction on the project is late 2023. We will have more information about construction timelines as we progress through the next phase of planning and design, but we remain committed to an in-service date of 2029-2030, after the Ontario Line is in service.

What is the project time frame, including starting time and phases?

The planned date to begin the main construction on the project is late 2023. We will have more information about construction timelines as we progress through the next phase of planning and design, but we remain committed to an in-service date of 2029-2030, after the Ontario Line is in service.

Where are the cost estimates ( up Yonge vs. Option 3 ) ? I have asked for these figures before, on your website, and have yet to receive any comments.

The Yonge North Subway Extension has been in the planning stage since the initiation of the Transit Project Assessment Process in 2007. Before Metrolinx assumed responsibility for the project in 2019, the estimated cost for the previous five station plan, which included stations at Cummer, Steeles, Clark, Langstaff, and Richmond Hill Centre, had grown to $9.3 billion, based on updated design information and cost estimates. The current proposal for the Yonge North Subway Extension uses innovative solutions to ensure the project can be built quickly and serve key growth areas while delivering the most possible benefits within a funding envelope of $5.6 billion.

You can find a more detailed breakdown of costs on page 120 in the Initial Business Case.

As per Gila Matlow's comments, why is there no planning for parking at Yonge and the 407?

The next stage in planning for the Yonge North Subway Extension includes the release of the Preliminary Design Business Case (PDBC), which will further refine the project's design, alignment, and benefits. Parking will be evaluated in more depth through the PDBC.

The Yonge North Subway Extension has been designed to support vibrant urban development along the alignment that creates faster, easier connections to rapid transit so that people can get out from behind the wheel. Those connections include local transit routes, TTC bus service, York Region local and Viva express bus service, Richmond Hill GO service, Highway 407 GO bus service, access with PRESTO (which automatically applies transfers and gives the user the lowest cost of a ride), as well as active transportation like walking and cycling.

According to YOUR business case, Opt 3 does meet optimal transit planning criteria (I.e. opt 3 does not take the most cars off the road, and does not provide the highest ridership). Why is Opt 3 still supported? Isn’t the primary objective of a subway plan to be an optimal transit delivery model?

Through our analysis, we found that Option 1 could be delivered with up to three stations at Steeles, Richmond Hill Centre, and Langstaff within the $5.6 billion announced funding envelope. Option 2 could also accommodate up to three stations in roughly the same areas. Option 3 has the benefit of allowing for a fourth station, since it minimizes the amount of costly tunneling required for the project.

This route also brings as many as six major rapid transit lines together through a new station in the northern section of the route – tentatively referred to as ‘Bridge Station.’ Placed on the existing railway corridor at surface level between the Highway 7 and Highway 407 corridors, Bridge Station will offer fast, easy transfers to downtown Toronto on Line 1, and act as a launchpad to explore the entire region through convenient connections to the regional transit network.

Your own reports show more ridership on Option 1. Why go to Option 3. We're guinea pigs.

Through our analysis, we found that Option 1 could be delivered with up to three stations at Steeles, Richmond Hill Centre, and Langstaff within the $5.6 billion announced funding envelope. Option 2 could also accommodate up to three stations in roughly the same areas. Option 3 has the benefit of allowing for a fourth station, since it minimizes the amount of costly tunneling required for the project.

This route also brings as many as six major rapid transit lines together through a new station in the northern section of the route – tentatively referred to as ‘Bridge Station.’ Placed on the existing railway corridor at surface level between the Highway 7 and Highway 407 corridors, Bridge Station will offer fast, easy transfers to downtown Toronto on Line 1, and act as a launchpad to explore the entire region through convenient connections to the regional transit network.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions for the project that are proven to work. A big benefit is that they’ll be based on modern and up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago. The detailed studies we’re doing right now will help us make sure we put all the right noise and vibration solutions in place so neighbourhoods along the route stay sought-after places to live in.

Was an option to have the line extended elevated from Finch to Richmond Hill studied?

Elevated options were not part of our business case analysis for the Yonge North Subway Extension because there would not be enough clearance between the highway overpasses and the overhead hydro lines in the northern section of the route to accommodate an elevated subway. Running the route underground from Finch Station to the CN Railway corridor means we can limit our property needs and minimize impacts to the community.

Why no Thornhill station? Thornhill residents have waited more than 40 years for a Yonge Subway extension to Thornhill. Now it seems it will finally be built. But there will be no Thornhill stations. With no proximate access and substantial increased bus/car traffic on an overburdened Yonge St, why should the people of Thornhill (Vaughan & Markham) support this project?

A new station in Thornhill at the intersection of Clark Avenue and Yonge Street will be included as the fourth station on the Yonge North Subway Extension. Clark Station will join Steeles, Bridge and High Tech stations to serve growing neighbourhoods along the Yonge Street corridor and beyond, becoming part of an expansive map of integrated projects, routes and even transit carriers that are rewiring the way riders can easily get to points all around the Greater Golden Horseshoe Region of Ontario. Our analysis shows Clark Station will put 8,100 people and 1,900 jobs within a 10-minute walk of the subway by 2041, which will feature transit hubs that will provide seamless connections to local and regional travel options.

One of the most important bus connections will be with the future extension of Viva Orange service, which will bring convenient access to areas like the Bathurst-and-Centre corridor and Promenade Centre, which is expected to be home to more than 11,000 people and almost 6,000 jobs in the years to come. We are exploring opportunities with our project partners to include Royal Orchard and Cummer stations.

Further discussions will be pursued with regional, municipal and development stakeholders to explore innovative funding solutions to enhance the final project scope.

RICHMOND HILL CENTRE ( temporary end of line)- Will routes #16 & 85 / branch -east & westbound use this station?

Will there be separate branch of these to Vaughan's hospital Terminal along future Mack busway?

Will routes #23 & 88 / branches loop here / continue to Steeles?

Will Blue bus lines continue to use this loop/ use Bridge Stn.?

Will it be linked by walking tunnel to Bridge Stn.?

The design concept and requirements for transit connections are being refined based on the needs identified by the TTC, York Region Transit, and other local stakeholders. We are seeking input from the TTC and City of Toronto and will share more details about the Steeles Station transit hub when the Preliminary Design Business Case is finalized.

As planning and design work on the project continues, we are working with our municipal partners to incorporate urban design elements that accommodate multi-use pedestrian paths that will provide a pleasant walking experience.

STEELES & Transit carriers - In what city/cities & sectors will stn. be located? Will routes TTC # 99 & 98 be on st. /in station? Will TTC #53,60 & # 7 be using 60 & /40 ft. busses? & YRT? Will YRT 98 & 91 use own platforms/have on street loop? How will bus layovers be handled? How will plazas & residential hi rises be linked? How many buildings in @ city?

Stations along the Yonge North Subway Extension will serve communities in Richmond Hill, Markham, Vaughan and Toronto. The design concept and requirements for transit connections are being refined based on the needs identified by the TTC, York Region Transit, and other local stakeholders. We are seeking input from the TTC and City of Toronto and will share more details about the Steeles Station transit hub when the Preliminary Design Business Case is finalized.

As planning and design work on the project continues, we are working with our municipal partners to incorporate urban design elements that accommodate multi-use pedestrian paths that will provide a pleasant walking experience.

Will Orange line use this station? So it could interline with the Pink & Purple lines .( #23 could go from Promenade to Clark Stn.) Would Orange continue to Beaver Creek area & return plus Pink & Purple continue to Promenade & return? Would Blue north & south & 407 Express trains go here or use Richmond Hill Centre to connect to subway?

One of the most important bus connections at Clark Station will be with the future extension of Viva Orange service, which will bring convenient access to areas like the Bathurst-and-Centre corridor and Promenade Centre, which is expected to be home to more than 11,000 people and almost 6,000 jobs in the years to come.

The design concept and requirements for transit connections are being refined based on the needs identified by the TTC, York Region Transit, and other local stakeholders. We are seeking input from the TTC and City of Toronto and will share more details about the Steeles Station transit hub when the Preliminary Design Business Case is finalized.

How will hi-rises on Steeles W. be linked to Stn? Is there room on Steeles W. for additional stoplight twixt Cdn Tire & Yonge?

Metrolinx is coordinating with municipalities and local transit agencies to integrate Steeles Station with all modes of transportation and align with the City of Toronto’s Yonge Street North Transportation Master Plan, City of Vaughan’s Yonge Steeles Urban Design & Streetscape Study, City of Markham’s Yonge Street Corridor Secondary Plan and proposed development applications in the area.

As planning and design work on the project continues, we will work with our municipal partners to ensure subway stations are safe, convenient and accessible. At Steeles Station, this includes new traffic signals at Steeles and Yonge to provide better pedestrian crossings opportunities, underground connections to the station with future developments, and integrating with future bus transit facilities.

Will there be more lights north/south of Steeles? How about E. of Yonge? When will traffic vol. study be done & linked to residents & businesses?

Metrolinx is conducting a comprehensive traffic analysis in collaboration with municipalities and local transit agencies. At Steeles Station, this analysis looks at station access and will ensure reliable and efficient bus operations.

At Steeles Station, this includes new traffic signals at Steeles and Yonge to provide better pedestrian crossings opportunities, underground connections to the station with future developments, and integrating with future bus transit facilities.

We expect to release the results of the traffic analysis and the proposed design in early 2022.

Will bus bays be exclusive or shared? Location of Bus exits & entries ?

The design concept and requirements for the bus terminal are being refined based on the needs identified by the TTC, York Region Transit, and other local stakeholders. We are seeking input from the TTC and City of Toronto and will share more details about the Steeles Station transit hub when the Preliminary Design Business Case is finalized.

As planning and design work on the project continues, we are working with our municipal partners to incorporate urban design elements that accommodate multi-use pedestrian paths that will provide a pleasant walking experience

How will you help make the subway more accessible for RO? You mentioned that you aim to optimize subway for walking access (re: questions around parking). As it stands with Option 3, it's very difficult for the community residents to walk to the planned stations. How will you make it more accessible for the Royal Orchard residents? Perhaps a more direct walking path (e.g. along the CN corridor)?

The next stage in planning for the Yonge North Subway Extension includes the release of the Preliminary Design Business Case (PDBC), which will further refine the project's design, alignment, and benefits.

As planning and design work on the project continues, we will work with our municipal partners to ensure subway stations are safe, convenient and accessible.

The Yonge North Subway Extension has been designed to support vibrant urban development along the route that creates faster, easier connections to rapid transit so that people can get out from behind the wheel. Those connections include local transit routes, TTC bus service, York Region local and Viva express bus service, Richmond Hill GO service, Highway 407 GO bus service, access with PRESTO (which automatically applies transfers and gives the user the lowest cost of a ride), as well as active transportation like walking and cycling.

Why do you suddenly own the rights to my home?!? Do you not find it strange that you DON'T ask permission to dig under our homes, yet, ironically, any house affected by the subway line, has to then ask permission to do any work to their home. Want a new pool -- ask Metrolinx!! Want a new deck -- ask Metrolinx!! Any renovations that want/need to be done, has to be approved by Metrolinx!! Why??

We recognize how important your property is to you and we are committed to providing clear, accurate information as soon as possible. If Metrolinx confirms that your property is needed, you will receive written notification directly from us. Our commitment is to ensure that owners and tenants do not experience a financial loss.

Metrolinx may need to acquire some property underground to build the tunnels and support future subway service. Sometimes an entire property is needed, and sometimes just part of it is needed; some property needs are temporary to support construction, and others are permanent to support new infrastructure. Subsurface easements allow for the use of space under the ground, below homes.

In any case, we will compensate owners with fair market value for any property that is needed. It’s important to note that Metrolinx compensates property owners even when the infrastructure we are building is deep underground and no space is occupied at surface level.

Permits are needed for work that would add, change or extend a structure on the property, such as a shed or an extension on a home. They are also needed for excavation or drainage work, like when building a pool. You won’t need a permit for work inside your home, like renovating a kitchen or bathroom.

Permits help Metrolinx understand what work might be happening along the priority transit project corridor and avoid conflicts that might delay transit construction or your plans. Metrolinx wants to work with you to coordinate construction activities and timing – not prevent you from making improvements. It is not expected that plans will be impacted in the large majority of cases. If some changes to your plans are required, Metrolinx will work with you on a solution.

Cost of risk in tunneling under our homes - As the marketplace has changed, contractors will not assume risks for tunneling under homes, how is Metrolinx going to assume that risk which will cost money?

Subways run under residential properties in many places throughout the world, and this is not an uncommon scenario for engineers and builders to encounter. Roads are also sensitive and critical infrastructure with water, sewer and gas pipes buried underneath. Tunnelling in any of these must be undertaken in a manner that doesn’t compromise on safety, regardless of what is above it.

We hold ourselves to the highest standards when it comes to safety. The Yonge North Subway Extension is no exception. We will ensure the strong, industry-leading safety standards are in place through construction and operations.

Are you going to expropriate homes There are rumours that homes on Shieldmark have received expropriation orders.

We are still very early in the planning and design process and have not identified impacted property owners.

If you live near a proposed project and you haven’t been contacted by Metrolinx yet, it could be for one of two reasons: either no impacts to your property are anticipated, or teams may not be at the stage where they are able to confirm if your property is needed, though it may be confirmed through further design work.

Metrolinx strives to communicate with property owners early and often so that there is ample time to work through solutions. We understand that residents and businesses want those details and we will reach out to impacted property owners at the earliest opportunity.

Metrolinx made a comment on the adjustment application - Metrolinx requests that an interference warning clause be inserted into any rental agreements/offer of purchase/ sale the property located 300 meters of the rail corridor right-of-way the extension work may result noise vibration electromagnetic, stray current smoke etc. Explain with this situation what would be the future of this neighbourhood?

The Planning Act requires municipal planning departments to notify companies operating a railway line regarding proposed development activity within 300 metres of the railway line. Metrolinx is the owner and/or operator of railway property, including the portion of the CN Rail corridor behind Shieldmark. Metrolinx reviews and comments on development applications within 300 metres of any rail corridor and within 60 metres of light rail transit, subway corridors and future transit projects. These comments are standard for any minor variance application in proximity to our rail corridor, as they help to avoid any land use conflicts, and make applicants aware of all possible impacts that could be associated with building close to our transit corridor.

Some properties in the Royal Orchard neighbourhood are in proximity to both the CN rail corridor, which carries Metrolinx’s Richmond Hill GO train service, and the proposed alignment of the Yonge North Subway Extension. Any comments received about impacts 300m from the rail corridor would have been related to the existing Richmond Hill GO line, not the Yonge North Subway Extension.

More detailed information on the review process can be found in our Adjacent Development Guidelines.

What insurance will you provide to residents against damage to their properties either during construction or subsequent operation period. How contractually binding would this be, and not simply words or statement of intent?

The tops of the tunnels through the Royal Orchard community will be at least 14 metres below the surface, which is equal to the height of a four-storey building. They will be surrounded by thick reinforced concrete and will be built to strict design and engineering standards.

To build the tunnels for the subway extension, Metrolinx will use state-of-the-art tunnel boring machines that carefully chew through and remove soil and rock. The Yonge North Subway Extension will use innovative technology that will help the machines adapt to different soil conditions when tunnelling. These specialized tunnel boring machines will minimize any surface settlement and protect properties along the tunnel alignment.

Metrolinx is committed to minimizing and managing construction impacts to you and your property. Before construction starts, we provide pre-construction surveys. A pre-condition survey is a non-invasive assessment of the exterior of your property completed prior to the start of our construction. This survey is an industry standard used to set baseline conditions of properties located in close vicinity to a construction site. Participation is completely voluntary and the service is paid for by Metrolinx.

During construction, we monitor noise and vibration and settlement during the tunneling process. Metrolinx is committed to addressing any noise and vibration due to construction and operation of the extension. Our aim is to ensure no appreciable difference between existing noise and vibration levels in your community.

Why are project risks to be assumed by contractors and not you? Metrolinx is allocating project risks to the contractors which could mean that when residents face risks our recourse will be to put claims on contractors. How can you indulge in such an unfair practice as Metrolinx has enabled the decision on Option 3. We should have the right to claim from you as contractors may go out of business for claims.

Ultimately, the risks associated with the project rests with Metrolinx. When Metrolinx contracts for construction work, it requires its contractors to carry insurance policies that are appropriate for the work being done.

We establish clear processes to investigate and document the existing conditions before construction, and we require ongoing monitoring during and after construction to protect against and prevent damage to property. In the event that there are damages, we are involved in the process to ensure it is done fairly and equitably for the property owner.

Is Metrolinx or decision makers providing the residents an irrevocable guarantee that the Project and subsequent operating trains will not in anyway impact our properties? If not, how are you giving us advise on how to protect our homes and properties from noise, vibrations or any other collateral damage due to your option 3?

Our job is to make sure that any impacts to communities are minimal and that they are far outweighed by the benefits new transit options bring.

The tops of the tunnels through the Royal Orchard community will be at least 14 metres below the surface, which is equal to the height of a four-storey building. The tunnels will be surrounded by thick reinforced concrete and will be built to strict design and engineering standards. Metrolinx is committed to addressing any noise and vibration due to construction and operation of the extension. Our aim is to ensure no appreciable difference between existing noise and vibration levels in your community using high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards. We will work with communities to ensure a comprehensive array of solutions are in place to keep things peaceful and quiet when the extension is up and running.

Where we need to acquire property to support new transit infrastructure, it is our responsibility to compensate property owners fairly, not necessarily because the subway will impact their property, but because they own the land that is needed. Whenever we need to acquire property to support a new transit project, we ensure that owners and tenants experience no financial loss.

We have a transparent and unbiased process in place to determine fair market value through appraisals and negotiations. Metrolinx will enlist the services of a third-party appraisal expert to estimate the value of the property. Market factors at the time of the acquisition will inform the assessment and will be based on comparable sales of similar properties in similar locations and situations.

When we confirm our property needs for the project, we will reach out to property owners to explain in detail what is needed and whether that need is permanent or temporary.

Does expropriation include land transfer tax and real estate fee - to purchase a new home after we are thrown out of our 36 year home? These fees are now so high. One does not give up a neighbourhood and life forcibly.

Metrolinx strives to limit the amount of property we need to support the construction and operation of important and much-needed transit infrastructure. Metrolinx will only look to acquire property that is absolutely necessary to support critical transit construction.

Whenever we need to acquire property to support a new transit project, we ensure that owners and tenants experience no financial loss.

Expropriation is a process that enables a government agency like Metrolinx to acquire property without a direct agreement with the owner for the purpose of building public infrastructure, while still ensuring that owners are compensated at fair market value in keeping with the Expropriations Act.

Expropriation is only initiated if it becomes clear that an agreement might not be reached within the required timelines for the specific transit project. The preferred approach is always to negotiate directly with owners to reach amicable, mutually beneficial agreements.

Even when expropriation is initiated, Metrolinx continues to negotiate with owners in the hope of reaching an agreement.

Tunnel boring is most economical and effective when you proceed on a straight alignment. Option 3 has 3 curves of varying curvature and a deep dip to pass under the Little Don creek and is approximately .5 Kms longer than a Yonge Street alignment which has 1 curve to sweep under the Ontario Hydro right of way to connect with the Richmond Hill Hub.

The route we’re moving forward with allows us to build a fourth station within the $5.6 billion funding envelope because it minimizes the amount of tunneling needed. With the other underground options, only three stations could be built.

Running subway trains along the existing CN rail corridor in the northern end of the route makes it possible to build that fourth station – and that’s why we need to run a tunnel from Yonge Street to connect to it. By running the extension at surface level along the existing CN railway corridor means we can finish the project sooner and reduces the need for complex, time-consuming, and costly construction of tunnels and underground stations. This approach also protects for a simpler and less costly further extension of the subway in the future.

It’s important to note that we’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions for the project that are proven to work. A big benefit is that they’ll be based on modern and up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago. The detailed studies we’re doing right now will help us make sure we put all the right noise and vibration solutions in place so neighbourhoods along the route stay sought-after places to live in.

How much space is there on Yonge at HCC available for subway & roads? (above & grave relocation/access? (Both side/ends?) (legal/engineering)

The width of the Yonge Street right-of-way at the cemetery is approximately 36 metres. Option 1, as documented in the Initial Business Case, is consistent with the option presented in the 2009 Environment Project Report. Based on the previous work and our analysis, there is sufficient space in the Yonge Street right-of-way adjacent to the cemetery, to accommodate the subway tunnels and a station at Langstaff Road. Option 1 was analyzed during our IBC and determined to provide fewer benefits at a higher cost than the preferred route.

The route we’re moving forward with allows us to build a fourth station within the $5.6 billion funding envelope because it minimizes the amount of tunneling needed. With the other underground options, only three stations could be built. Running the subway along the CN rail corridor in the northern end of the extension will also create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth.

Deep Tunneling under Homes? - Not True! Metrolinx outlined that a subway will be tunneled at 20m below a home - however, when you deduct the tunnel height of 6m, and then deduct a home basement height of 3m, you are left with a true depth of the subway tunnel of only 10m (or 30ft). Metrolinx needs to stop suggesting this is deep tunneling and residential homes will not be affected!!

The tunnels along the Yonge North Subway Extension will be built to strict design and engineering standards and will be much deeper underground than in many areas of Toronto’s existing subway network. The bottoms of the tunnels – where trains pass over the tracks – will be at least 20 metres deep in the Royal Orchard community – roughly as deep as a six-storey building is tall. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions for the project that are proven to work. A big benefit is that they’ll be based on modern and up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago. We expect to have more detailed information about potential impacts in the coming months as further design work is refined and we move forward with environmental assessments, but our goal will be to minimize impacts to communities as much as possible as we deliver major transit benefits to them.

You mentioned about a floating track that is cushioned by rubber pucks. How long do they last and at what rate do they deteriorate and how does the deterioration affect noise and vibration

We’re looking at a wide array of proven noise and vibration solutions for the project, including resilient fasteners, floating slab and ballast mats to help cushion the tracks and reduce noise and vibration. Rail dampers can also be used to help reduce the noise from passing trains. These types of solutions have been used around the world, including on the recently completed Toronto-York Spadina Subway Extension. We will have more detailed information about the solutions we’ll be putting in place in the coming months as further design work is refined and we conduct and consult on environmental assessments.

Noise, vibration, ventilation and emergency exits

- I assume your mitigation efforts are the same as on the Spadina extension. Didn't work. Students in Winters Residence at York U. hear & feel every train.

- How many ventilation shafts and emergency exits will you need under our community? Air quality?

We’re looking at a wide array of proven noise and vibration solutions for the project, including resilient fasteners, floating slab and ballast mats to help cushion the tracks and reduce noise and vibration. Rail dampers can also be used to help reduce the noise from passing trains. These types of solutions have been used around the world, including on the recently completed Toronto-York Spadina Subway Extension. We will have more detailed information about the solutions we’ll be putting in place in the coming months as further design work is refined and we conduct and consult on environmental assessments.

Emergency exit buildings will be needed at various points between stations and are only used in the unlikely event of an emergency in the tunnel that would require people to safely get to the surface. Our design team is working to determine the number of emergency exit buildings needed along the entire route of the subway, with a specific focus to reduce the number needed in residential areas. Emergency exit buildings are single storey structures that are much smaller than a house and can be designed in a variety of ways to fit the look and feel of the area around them.

Noise Vibration I teach at York University - two basement lecture halls are 20 meters above the top of current Subway - I can feel the trains going to the station at York U when I stand during the lecture - the speed is slow since they are entering the station - you can still feel the vibrations-they have been working on but still not resolved in the lecture halls

We will make sure that future subway service will be unobtrusive and difficult to notice, ensuring communities will be peaceful and quiet when the subway is in service. Our aim is to make sure there are no significant differences between levels of noise and vibration experienced in Royal Orchard today and what those levels will be when the extension is in service. We will have more detailed information about the solutions we’ll be putting in place in the coming months as further design work is refined and we conduct and consult on environmental assessments.

If significant advantage will the residential owners have any impact to their use and enjoyment of their home during or after construction

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions for the project that are proven to work. A big benefit is that they’ll be based on modern and up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago. We will make sure that future subway service will be unobtrusive and difficult to notice, ensuring communities will be peaceful and quiet when the subway is in service. Our aim is to make sure there are no significant differences between levels of noise and vibration experienced in Royal Orchard today and what those levels will be when the extension is in service. We will have more detailed information about the solutions we’ll be putting in place in the coming months as further design work is refined and we conduct and consult on environmental assessments.

Plan to accommodate increased traffic congestion on local

We will be working with the our municipal and regional partners to develop a plan that will keep pedestrian and vehicle traffic moving and make sure people can get where they need to go easily while construction is happening. Our plan considers factors like; how people will access local businesses quickly and easily; and how to minimize impacts on TTC, York Region Transit and GO services. Potential traffic impacts are being studied through an updated environmental assessment. We expect to release a draft report on the findings early next year.

What is your plan to accommodate increased traffic congestion on local & arterial roads as drivers drop-off, pick-up, and attempt to find parking to access the new subway stations?

We are preparing an addendum to the existing environmental assessment (EA) that will cover off any changes to existing conditions since the initial EA was completed in 2009 and evaluate the updated route. We’ve already started to collect public input through the virtual open house events we’ve been hosting. We’ll also be reaching out for feedback from the community as we prepare an updated environmental assessment for the project, which can include discussing options for mitigating noise and vibration, air quality, and traffic during construction and operation of the line.

Marked subway crowding. It is not HORRIBLY CROWDED getting on at Finch. How will changes related to this extension RELIEVE that crowding?

The extension won’t come online until the Ontario Line goes into service, which will significantly reduce crowding on Line 1.

The Yonge North Subway Extension is also one of four projects under the Subway Program that are designed to spread demand across the transit network as it expands.

Ridership numbers and how to ameliorate crowding at Finch - Has anyone tried to predict the number of riders that currently go to Finch station who will board north of Finch plus the new riders north of Finch and the effect this may have on being able to board at Finch? What actions are being planned to address possible boarding issues as a result of trains being full by the time they arrive at Finch?

The extension won’t come online until the Ontario Line goes into service, which will significantly reduce crowding on Line 1.

The Yonge North Subway Extension is also one of four projects under the Subway Program that are designed to spread demand across the transit network as it expands.

Our analysis shows about 59,300 riders would get on the subway at Finch Station by 2041, if there the extension was not built.

In comparison, building the Yonge North Subway Extension would put a combined 94,100 riders on the subway daily. By 2041, this would bring 48,800 people within walking distance of the new stations and would give 26,000 more people access to rapid transit compared to a scenario where the extension was not built.

Why was there drilling along railway in September 2021. I saw and heard at least five sites, behind Shieldmark and beside Holy Cross. Why?

Investigative drilling is taking place within the road allowance and on select private properties, like the CN Rail right-of-way, to help advance design work for the project. It is to assess underground conditions and does not necessarily mean the property will be impacted. The samples we take from below the surface will inform our work as we look at how we can build the subway even deeper, and under fewer homes in the Royal Orchard community.

Will all the workers who will be working on school property be required to obtain the vulnerable sector check?

Yes, workers on school property will be required to obtain the vulnerable sector check.

Meet the Speakers

Photo of Raj Khetarpal

Raj Khetarpal

Acting VP for Community Engagement – 905 Region

Photo of Stephen Collins

Stephen Collins

Program Sponsor for YNSE

Mark Ciarvarro

Mark Ciavarro

Vice President of Subways Project Delivery

Photo of James Francis

James Francis

Manager, Environmental Programs and Assessment

Maria Doyle

Maria Doyle

Manager, Property Acquisitions

Joseph Digerness

Joseph Digerness

Associate, Accoustics and Audiovisual, Arup

Other Attendees:

  • Leona Hollingsworth, Director, Community Engagement – 905
  • Nick Faieta, Senior Manager, Community Engagement – York Region
  • Sam Kulendran, Engineer, Technical Advisor

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Questions and Answers

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar

opposed Option 3, how does Metrolinx with good conscience, continue with Opt 3?

Anonymous's avatar

Believe the same law applies to my home. Why are my “sensitivities” & rights ignored?

Anonymous's avatar

I have been advised that in a recent reply to a complaint by a taxpayer that Metrolinx has assured her that the disruptions to families and homes will be NIL, due to the depths of the tunnels and the modern technology that will be used. If that is the case, then why can't you tunnel under the cemetery where no one sleeps or lives?

Anonymous's avatar

Planning criteria (I.e. opt 3 does not take the most cars off the road, and does not provide the highest ridership). Why is Opt 3 still supported? Isn’t the primary objective of a subway plan to be an optimal transit delivery model?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 14, 2021 - 09:44

You constantly talk about the benefits but I have never seen nor heard what those benefits are. Who benefits from this option?

Anonymous's avatar

Vaughan and Markham governments both oppose Option 3. Why are you on the side of the developers instead of the people?

Anonymous's avatar

1. I assume your mitigation efforts are the same as on the Spadina extension. Didn't work. Students in Winters Residence at York U. hear & feel every train.
2. How many ventilation shafts and emergency exits will you need under our community? Air quality?
3. Your own reports show more ridership on Option 1. Why go to Option 3. We're guinea pigs.

Anonymous's avatar

Metrolinx requests that an interference warning clause be inserted into any rental agreements/offer of purchase/ sale the property located 300 meters of the rail corridor right-of-way the extension work may result noise vibration electromagnetic, stray current smoke etc. Explain with this situation what would be the future of this neighbourhood ?

Anonymous's avatar

Is there still a possibility that a fifth station will be added? How likely is this scenario? Is Metrolinx actively working to make sure that we do have a fifth station on the line?

Anonymous's avatar

This is obviously a benefit to large developers and totally detrimental to the living Royal Orchard residents. Notice I said living as you have been warned off going under the deceased at Holy Cross ! I cannot believe the shell game you people are trying to foist upon us. We are living citizens in Canada a supposedly democratic country.

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 18, 2021 - 23:21

There are rumours that homes on Shieldmark have received expropriation orders.

Anonymous's avatar

Thornhill is very concerned poor communication. I have outstanding questions since April 2021. Why did you schedule this meeting in conflict with the York Region Transportation meeting on the same date? Please answer all of my questions previously asked. Why don't you be honest with us?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 18, 2021 - 10:15

Can you share with us the detailed operating plan with funding of Option 3 and the comparison of a detailed operating plan for other options? Have you conducted research from local residents, councillors, and businesses in the area to support this endeavor? could you please share your results

Anonymous's avatar

Do you not find it strange that you DON'T ask permission to dig under our homes, yet, ironically, any house affected by the subway line, has to then ask permission to do any work to their home. Want a new pool -- ask Metrolinx!! Want a new deck -- ask Metrolinx!! Any renovations that want/need to be done, has to be approved by Metrolinx!! Why??

Anonymous's avatar

What is the project time frame, including starting time and phases?
How many stations are included and where?
What is the difference between this extention compare with the existing line? Physical and technical?

Anonymous's avatar

their properties either during construction or subsequent operation period. How contractually binding would this be, and not simply words or statement of intent?

Anonymous's avatar

I have asked for these figures before, on your website, and have yet to receive any comments.

Anonymous's avatar

What is your plan to accommodate increased traffic congestion on local & arterial roads as drivers drop-off, pick-up, and attempt to find parking to access the new subway stations?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 15, 2021 - 12:59

What difficulties are posed in using cemetery property for subway/road? What is Process in moving graves?
Proximity of subway & rail lines. How will accidents & movement conflicts be handled /mitigated?
How much space is there on Yonge at HCC available for subway & roads?
(above & grave relocation/access? (Both side/ends?) (legal/engineering)

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 17, 2021 - 15:46

1. What are the benefits of Option 3, namely realigning part of the subway from Yonge Street east to the railway
2. If significant advantage will the residential owners have any impact to their use and enjoyment of their home
1. During construction
2. After construction
Thank you for your response

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 20, 2021 - 16:09

Thornhill residents have waited more than 40 years for a Yonge Subway extension to Thornhill. Now it seems it will finally be built. But there will be no Thornhill stations. With no proximate access and substantial increased bus/car traffic on an overburdened Yonge St, why should the people of Thornhill (Vaughan & Markham) support this project?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 18, 2021 - 19:38

As the marketplace has changed, contractors will not assume risks for tunneling under homes, how is Metrolinx going to assume that risk which will cost money?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 19, 2021 - 09:39

Who is the final decision maker regarding which option is finalized? Please be specific as to how that process will work.

Anonymous's avatar

I am a York region taxpayer. I am told that to keep the subway on Yonge is more expensive. I don't live around Yonge area. But I don't want to save my tax dollars at the expense of local residents. Residents will lose much more over the years than is saved of my taxes. Why does YNSE find it acceptable? Why not to let taxpayers vote on it?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 16, 2021 - 17:25

Goal of Metrolinx is at-grade stations at Bridge & High Tech, + lower cost.
Goal of the community is to not go under houses & have extra station or 2.
So do both.
1. Cut&Cover Finch to Steeles (Cummer Sta.).
2. TBM to Don River & Bridge over Don (Royal Orch. Sta.).
3. C&C to Cemetery.
4. 2-250m radius curves to get to CPR at-grade.

Anonymous's avatar

We want the subway on Yonge not under our houses! How tough is that for you to understand ? This is a plan cooked up by incompetent government "planners" who will not be affected where they live !

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 20, 2021 - 12:39

Common sense and EVERY concerned group including City councils, neighbourhood and residents groups and business groups ALL strongly want the subway extension to stay under Yonge Street. This was also the original plan for decades. Why change to something that causes greater disruption and no benefits?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 21, 2021 - 13:39

I teach at York University - two basement lecture halls are 20 meters above the top of current Subway - I can feel the trains going to the station at York U when I stand during the lecture - the speed is slow since they are entering the station - you can still feel the vibrations-they have been working on but still not resolved in the lecture halls

Anonymous's avatar

We would like to know the exact location from the point where the line exits Yonge to where it meets up with the existing line.

Anonymous's avatar

Will all the workers who will be working on school property be required to obtain the vulnerable sector check?

Anonymous's avatar

I saw and heard at least five sites, behind Shieldmark and beside Holy Cross. Why?

Anonymous's avatar

Is Metrolinx or decision makers providing the residents an irrevocable guarantee that the Project and subsequent operating trains will not in anyway impact our properties? If not, how are you giving us advise on how to protect our homes and properties from noise, vibrations or any other collateral damage due to your option 3?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 19, 2021 - 19:45

It is not HORRIBLY CROWDED getting on at Finch. How will changes related to this extension RELIEVE that crowding?

Anonymous's avatar

We have heard that you have disclosed to certain parties (school board, City) the final route of the tunnels and map. And you are repeatedly telling us (residents) that the route is not finalized though you are digging boreholes in a premeditated manner. Why are you not disclosing the route to residents of Royal Orchard community?

Anonymous's avatar

Indoor bicycle storing facility at stations allows passengers to store their bicycles more safely.

Anonymous's avatar

pucks. How long do they last and at what rate do they deteriorate and how does the deterioration affect noise and vibration

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 19, 2021 - 15:00

Given the massive opposition from so may sources, why is "option 3" still in your plan?

Anonymous's avatar

Metrolinx is allocating project risks to the contractors which could mean that when residents face risks our recourse will be to put claims on contractors. How can you indulge in such an unfair practice as Metrolinx has enabled the decision on Option 3. We should have the right to claim from you as contractors may go out of business for claims.

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 19, 2021 - 21:33

I cannot believe the out and out lies, half truths and deception of this group of bullies ! If you cowards were not able to hide behind this Covid virtual shield you would be shouted out of the rooms. Shame on you all !

Anonymous's avatar

I've never heard any reference to an approximate starting date of construction, or a completion date. Can you enlighten us to an approximate date for both?

Anonymous's avatar

Will routes #16 & 85 / branch -east & westbound use this station?
Will there be separate branch of these to Vaughan's hospital Terminal along future Mack busway?
Will routes #23 & 88 / branches loop here / continue to Steeles?
Will Blue bus lines continue to use this loop/ use Bridge Stn.?
Will it be linked by walking tunnel to Bridge Stn.?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 18, 2021 - 19:44

Please provide the proposed Option 3 route as the geotechnical study is underway along this route. Please do not beat around the bush to provide the answer that you have.

Anonymous's avatar

There are graves on either side of the narrow bridge that accommodates the CN lines. How are you getting from Royal Orchard to Richmond Hill without going through Holy Cross. Isn't that more disruptive than under it?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 15, 2021 - 12:26

Is Stn. on S. side (parking lot) or N. side (Auto garage)? as # of conflicting turns & stops differ.
Could #23 alternative run short turn service only to & from Promenade?
( S. of Clark, it is very close to Steeles & would eliminate 1 platform (space) @ Steeles)
Orange needs longer platform.
Possible hi-rise housing & commerce on Clark E.?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 20, 2021 - 09:12

Both Vaughan and Markham councils have opposed Option 3, School Boards oppose Option 3, residents oppose option 3. If Metrolinx doesn’t listen to vested participants in this alignment, don’t say you are consulting. You are telling.

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 20, 2021 - 12:22

Tunnel boring is most economical and effective when you proceed on a straight alignment. Option 3 has 3 curves of varying curvature and a deep dip to pass under the Little Don creek and is approximately .5 Kms longer than a Yonge Street alignment which has 1 curve to sweep under the Ontario Hydro right of way to connect with the Richmond Hill Hub..

Anonymous's avatar

Was an option to have the line extended elevated from Finch to Richmond Hill studied?

Anonymous's avatar

With all the opposition, why is Metrolinx still continuing with Option 3, now rebranded as the "Reference Alignment"? No one is in support of this Option with shallow tunneling under houses and Schools. This includes everyone in the established Royal Orchard community, Markham Council, and Vaughn Council. Keep the Yonge Subway under Yonge St!

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 20, 2021 - 18:54

Will Metrolinx be using their own wayfinding design standards on the extension stations? If so, won't it be jarring for passengers to have one wayfinding standard south of Finch Station and a different standard north of Finch?

Anonymous's avatar

Has anyone tried to predict the number of riders that currently go to Finch station who will board north of Finch plus the new riders north of Finch and the effect this may have on being able to board at Finch? What actions are being planned to address possible boarding issues as a result of trains being full by the time they arrive at Finch?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 18, 2021 - 13:56

In his market update letter the CEO of Infrastructure Ontario states when referring to the made-in-Ontario P3 programs that IO adapts and expands on its approaches “to suit the realities of a changing marketplace”. How have these realities impacted the YNSE? How will Metrolinx manage these changes? What effect will these changes have on price?

Anonymous's avatar

Station and the south platform of High Tech Station? Why are stations placed so close together but nothing between Clarke and Bridge?

Anonymous's avatar

How much are the rich folks living on Centre Street paying Metrolinx/ON to avoid building a station there?

Anonymous's avatar

Knowing the route is important, but I still think moving off Yonge is a shortsighted decision. These are 100-year calls that are being made and the original plan of keeping the subway under Yonge St is still a better long term solution. For full disclosure I am not impacted by this route change, but I still think it is the wrong call for the future

Anonymous's avatar

Yonge Street is wide enough to permit exclusive rapid bus lanes. This could be built far quicker than underground subways and would be far less costly to the lowly taxpayers. Any consideration for this idea??

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 20, 2021 - 19:04

Metrolinx outlined that a subway will be tunneled at 20m below a home - however, when you deduct the tunnel height of 6m, and then deduct a home basement height of 3m, you are left with a true depth of the subway tunnel of only 10m (or 30ft). Metrolinx needs to stop suggesting this is deep tunneling and residential homes will not be affected!!

Anonymous's avatar

It's clear that Metrolinx is in the pocket of land developers who want to build giant condo towers along Yonge Street and Hwy 7. In cancelling Cummer and Royal Orchard stations, but insisting that both Bridge and High Tech stations MUST be kept, you are sacrificing the interests of existing residents in favour of potential future condos

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 15, 2021 - 12:43

In what city/cities & sectors will stn. be located?
Will routes TTC # 99 & 98 be on st. /in station?
Will TTC #53,60 & # 7 &#11 be using 60 & /40 ft. busses? & YRT?
Will YRT 98 & 91 use own platforms/have on street loop? How will bus layovers be handled?
How will plazas & residential hi rises be linked? How many buildings in @ city?

Anonymous's avatar

Why, with no votes from city councils, concern from CN and other transit experts, as well as area political leaders and residents, is this unethical design choice being pursued while other technical ethical solutions are available. A simple cheap idea is not always ethical or sensible. Catering to developers above long term residents is wrong.

Anonymous's avatar

Where you are already prepared to leave Yonge Street at Royal Orchard, would you consider instead leaving Yonge right at Centre Street, crossing under the golf course directly to the CN Rail? This way only a handful of residences would be affected - also, might Centre Street not be considered a logical station location?

Anonymous's avatar

I am very sensitive. So are my neighbours. I have asthma, am a cancer survivor and suffer from ptsd. I want a veto from the subway going under, cross, through or behind my house. Who do I call?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 20, 2021 - 18:04

When the subway goes under my house will I get an escalator to access it?

Anonymous's avatar

These two stations are so close! Don’t see the point of having both of them.

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 19, 2021 - 19:54

How will hi-rises on Steeles W. be linked to Stn? Is there room on Steeles W. for additional stoplight twixt Cdn Tire & Yonge?
Will there be more lights north/south of Steeles? How about E. of Yonge?
When will traffic vol. study be done & linked to residents & businesses?
Will bus bays be exclusive or shared? Location of Bus exits & entries ?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 15, 2021 - 11:50

Will Orange line use this station? So it could interline with the Pink & Purple lines .( #23 could go from Promenade to Clark Stn.)
Would Orange continue to Beaver Creek area & return plus Pink & Purple continue to Promenade & return?
Would Blue north & south & 407 Express trains go here or use Richmond Hill Centre to connect to subway?

.

Anonymous's avatar

Why not create exclusive bus lanes instead of an underground subway? The cost savings would be gargantuan (a blessing for tax payers), it could be started and completed in far less time than going underground, and Yonge Street is certainly wide enough to accommodate the exclusive bus lanes. Eglinton is an absolute nightmare.

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 20, 2021 - 19:00

Will the stations be accessible for seniors with walkers, canes, or possibly wheel chairs? Not all of the existing subway stations even now are accessible for any people with disabilities. Often escalators (the few that there are) are non-functioning.

Anonymous's avatar

If you went up Yonge you would not have any of these issues! Boy double depth burials get more weight than we living citizens. Thanks Stephen!

Anonymous's avatar

You mentioned that you aim to optimize subway for walking access (re: questions around parking). As it stands with Option 3, it's very difficult for the community residents to walk to the planned stations. How will you make it more accessible for the Royal Orchard residents? Perhaps a more direct walking path (e.g. along the CN corridor)?

Anonymous's avatar

to purchase a new home after we are thrown out of our 36 year home? These fees are now so high.
One does not give up a neighbourhood and life forcibly.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 20, 2021 - 19:39

You have never tunneled under housing. Why pick the most complicated route? Obviously there is another reason. A developer will benefit.

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 20, 2021 - 14:16

The Promenade area is the hub of Thornhill. Obviously the subway curving from Yonge and Steeles to Bathurst and Centre and then to Yonge and Highway 7 is more costly, but shouldn’t the subway go to where people live, work and shop?

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 20, 2021 - 19:21

Collins just as much admitted that our views were never considered. Why can you not admit that this is a bad idea!

Anonymous's avatar

In the initial conceptual plans, it showed that Steeles station would have an extensive underground bus terminal that would both serve TTC and a number of YRT services. It also showed in the plans that this bus terminal would easily connect to the proposed Steeles BRT. What happened to this plan? Building a surface terminal would hinder development

Anonymous's avatar
Oct 19, 2021 - 18:01

A one line tunnel, by 2030+, will not handle the rider load ! Probably 1,000,000+ NEW residents in this area in 10 years ! Hwy. 407/ Yonge is slated to be a confluence for traffic and passengers for the subway. We will need 2 lines ? More tunneling under houses? We're at risk, and no Royal Orchard station ? Am I correct, or nuts?