> ECWE LIVE - September 28, 2021 | Metrolinx Engage

ECWE LIVE - September 28, 2021

On September 28, Metrolinx hosted a virtual house to talk about what’s happening between Jane Street and the under-construction Mount Dennis Station. The session focused on the east portal for the tunnel and the elevated guideway, plus the launch shaft for the tunnel boring machines that will dig the two tunnels under Eglinton Avenue West and connect into the future Mount Dennis Station. We answered as many questions as possible during the event.

In case you missed the event, you’ll find the answers in the video recording below. We also received additional questions during the virtual session and are committed to answering those as well. Answers will be posted at the bottom of this page.

Call-In With Your Question

As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we are adding a call-in option for tonight’s event. To ask your question by voice, join the Zoom meeting here. We aim to keep each question and subsequent answer to 3 minutes allowing for as many call-in questions as possible.

NOTE: please ensure you have the latest version of Zoom installed.

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Agenda

6:30PM - 7:00PM: Project Update

7:00PM - 7:30PM: Questions and Answers to Pre-Submitted Questions

7:30PM - 8:00PM: Call-in Questions

Meet the Speakers

Joshua Engel-Yan

Joshua Engel-Yan

ECWE Program Sponsor (Metrolinx)

Photo of Elmira Moghani

Elmira Moghani

ECWE Project Manager, Metrolinx

Yen Wu

Yen Wu

Guideway & Jane Portal Design - Technical Advisor (ARUP)

Sean Arnold

Sean Arnold

Design Team Lead - Technical Advisor (ARUP)

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 09:23

Metrolinx stated: “When it comes to decisions related to transit planning and construction, the role of Metrolinx is to provide evidence, analysis, and advice to the Provincial government, who then makes decisions about how to allocate taxpayer dollars.”
These Metrolinx Engage meetings don’t appear to be community consultations. They appear to be presentations telling taxpayers what Metrolinx is doing. These meetings need to be consultations where Metrolinx representatives listen and act upon community feedback. Feedback that is often based on evidence. From there, Metrolinx is in the position to advise our elected government about how to allocate billions of taxpayer dollars in the best interest of the people and communities they serve. What is your response to this observation?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 14:18

When it comes to decisions related to transit planning and construction, the role of Metrolinx is to provide evidence, analysis, and advice to the Provincial government, who then makes decisions about how to allocate taxpayer dollars. This evidence, analysis and advice is communicated through the business case process, which is a comprehensive collection of evidence and analysis that sets out the rationale for why an investment should be made to solve a problem or address an opportunity. It’s part of an open and transparent decision making process. The business case lifecycle – the transition from options analysis to planning and design on a preferred option and finally to delivery and operations – relies on a progression of decisions to guide the advancement of an investment. You can learn more about the business case process here.

Metrolinx published an Initial Business Case for the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension, which explored several alignment options. The IBC evaluated each alignment across four key categories: strategic, economic, financial and deliverability and operations cases. 

Anonymous's avatar

The Jane bus was the second busiest surface route in 2020. Sooner or later another LRT line running north and south on Jane will have to be built to accomodate these passengers. The proposed ECWE bridge on the north side of Eglinton will have a conflict with this future Jane LRT. If the Jane line were to run under the ECWE bridge to cross Eglinton, it will be stuck in the flood basin, while also having conflicts with the roads. It would not make sense to build another bridge higher than the ECWE bridge, because that is already too high. The only way to avoid all these problems is to build the ECWE underground, and have the future Jane LRT run on a bridge over Eglinton. This way, if a flood closes the Eglinton/Jane intersection, both lines will still work because the ECWE will run under the flood and the Jane LRT will run above the flood.

Anonymous's avatar

In response to numerous questions relating to tree loss in Eglinton Flats/Fergie Brown Park, Metrolinx said: “The elevated guideway will be built on the boulevard beside Eglinton Avenue West not in the park.”
2 Questions . . . What is the required setback distance from the street and sidewalks? There is no boulevard beside the park. A recreational path is currently under construction along Eglinton Avenue on the edge of Fergie Brown park. There is a very steep, treed slope down into the park beside this multi-use trail. Technically, how can an LRT portal leading to an elevated guideway not be constructed within the park?

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 09:16

Regarding billions of additional dollars in federal funding . . .
Metrolinx said: “We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case, including a fully tunneled option. The mixed alignment with 7 stations that we’re moving forward with is estimated to cost $4.7billion. The fully tunneled option with 9 stations is estimated at $5.8B.”
Metrolinx is comparing a 7 station plan to a 9 station plan. This is not a valid comparison. Apples to Oranges vs. Apples to Apples. How can Metrolinx compare a financial plan with 7 stations to a financial plan with 9 stations?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 27, 2021 - 08:04

Metrolinx has expressed concern about tunnelling 30m underground below the Humber River, although the river is relatively shallow and narrow. At Eglinton Avenue, if desired, one could walk across the river. Much deeper tunnels under major waterways around the world have been constructed. Some of the cities include London, Hamburg, New York, San Fransisco, Washington DC, Windsor, Vancouver, France, Norway, Argentina and Tokyo. The earliest tunnel construction dates back to the 1800’s. It’s 2021 and the technology exists and funding is in place to revert to the original business case for the fully tunnelled EWCE. Why is Metrolinx insisting on the 1.5km above ground section and an additional bridge over the Humber River that most residents oppose?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 14:22

The key consideration is that the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. Tunnelling would require building underneath three flood-prone waterways (under the Humber River) and present significant environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Elevating the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension between Scarlett Road and Jane Street eliminates these challenges and will help to prevent potential service disruptions along the corridor during times of heavy rain and flooding.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 24, 2021 - 23:05

Over 10 years ago, the original plan was to build the LRT section through Etobicoke at an at-grade alignment because back then that part of Eglinton was undeveloped with many lanes of traffic and vacant land on both sides. For some reason, after Mount Dennis residents successfully buried the LRT under our community, Metrolinx delayed the proceedings which gave developers a convenient opportunity to rapidly build housing projects on the north side of Eglinton in Etobicoke. This prevented the at-grade alignment from ever happening, resulting in the forced tunneling option we have today. Did something going on behind the scenes between Metrolinx and the billionaire developers? Is this like a conflict of interest? Now the plan is to build the bridge over the Humber River in order to make up for the money that was spent tunneling under Etobicoke. Does Metrolinx really care about the environment, or about money?

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 08:04

The bird mortality rate associated with clear barriers and glass windows is very high. We understand that the morse code dot pattern graphics are unique to Metrolinx, therefore experimental, risking bird collisions and deaths. There are a number of threatened species protected under the ESA that migrate, breed and live within Eglinton Flats. Are there any real-world case studies that prove the morse code dot pattern graphics are an adequate deterrent?

Anonymous's avatar

TTC is closing the above ground Scarborough RT line, due to increasing infrastructure failures. Extreme temperatures and inclement weather, combined with failing equipment have negatively impacted service. Millions have been spent on overhauls. Returning to the Metrolinx original plan to have the ECWE underground, instead of the 1.5km above ground tracks and stations between Scarlett Road and Fergy Brown Park will save taxpayers money and provide better service in the long run. Why cut costs and sacrifice parkland in Mount Dennis for Metrolinx and the Ford government’s short-term gain?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 14:49

Safety is at the forefront of the design process so we’re thinking ahead as we work on the design. Above-ground rapid transit is already a proven solution in cold weather cities across the world, in Calgary, Edmonton, and the TTC’s existing subways here in Toronto. Essentially this is a bridge and there are endless examples of how inclement weather is managed to keep traffic or transit moving safely. For the most part, the LRT vehicles will help keep the tracks clear of snow and a drainage system will keep ice from building up. The design we’re looking at could drain water through the centre of the guideway to avoid icicles forming on the sides. We’ll also look at types of coatings on the guideway to keep the snow or ice from sticking and forming in the first place.

We appreciate there have been many discussions on how to deliver rapid transit along Eglinton West over the years. The mixed alignment moving forward provides an optimal trade-off between the ease of local access and the speed of travelling, and outperforms all other options in offering the best network connectivity, travel experience for people living and travelling along the corridor, the highest ridership increase, and access to the most jobs. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 08:03

At its highest point, within one foot, including clear barriers and overhead power poles, how high above grade would the guideway be? Likewise, how high above grade would the two proposed stations at Jane and Scarlett be?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 15:59

In terms of the stations, clearance over the roads is 6m from the ground to the underside of the guideway per City of Toronto guidelines. In addition to this clearance, accounting for the actual superstructure height and the height all the way to the top of overhead contact systems (the power for the LRTs) the height totals to approximately 15m. We are working on the details and will provide cross section diagrams that demonstrate these measurements at the next engagement.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 12:51

From the August 19 meeting, Metrolinx's answers kept talking about how all their plans were outlined in the Business Case for this project. As taxpayers, we are not only funding the ECWE but are also paying your salaries and the salaries of the elected officials. Therefore it is your responsibility to ensure that the Business Case you present to the government must make best use of our money and follow the wants of the people.

When looking at the highest voted questions from previous meetings, we can see that the most popular ones are either talking about the benefits of a tunnel under the Humber River, or how the elevated guideway will severely harm the wildlife, environment, and quality of life in York South-Weston. There is no doubt that a tunnel is the best use of taxpayer money for this project, and the archive of all these meetings is the evidence. Will Metrolinx and the government learn from the mistakes of the Scarborough RT and the Gardiner Expressway? In a few decades when the elevated guideway is torn down, people sitting at home will be able to easily find out who was responsible for this mistake.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 16:18

We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case, including a fully tunneled option. The mixed alignment with 7 stations that we’re moving forward with is estimated to cost $4.7billion. The fully tunneled option with 9 stations is estimated at $5.8B. The mixed alignment we’re moving forward with provides the highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs. There are also challenges to fully tunneling, since the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. While all solutions are technically feasible, tunnelling would require building underneath the Humber River, which presents environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Underground stations at Scarlett and Jane would require excavating approximately 30m under the Humber which is twice the depth of the other underground stations. This would cause more intense and longer local community construction impacts. For context, it would be 10+m deeper than the excavation that’s happened for stations at Yonge Station and Cedarvale Station (Allen Road) on the ECLRT. Elevating the ECWE over the Humber River eliminates these challenges, and the potential for unforeseen conflicts with such deep underground conditions, while delivering more benefits.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 12:54

As a resident of Mt. Dennis, I walk to No Frills every weekend to go shopping. Every time, I look north at the bridge over Black Creek at Eglinton and think about how ugly and industrial it looks. I have even heard that there is a hi-rise building planned to be built in the No Frills area. It looks like the east side of Weston Rd is already destroyed, and we will have to deal with it looking like an industrial area. Metrolinx claims they care about the environment but all you’ve done is plant some grass along the walls of the bridge to the west of Black Creek. Now, you want to make another bridge several times as long, and repeat this on the other side of Mt. Dennis, essentially suffocating the community from both sides. This is unacceptable and shows you don’t care at all about the people or the environment in our community.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 13:21

Looking at the Jane/Eglinton intersection, there are widespread sports facilities on all 4 corners with soccer, cricket, tennis, and golf. These sports are a great way for residents all over the GTA to improve their physical and mental health, but the athletes all require a lot of concentration. With trains running overhead every few minutes, how is anyone supposed to stay focused enough to perform at a competitive level? This issue has never been brought up by Metrolinx.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 16:43

Access to the parks will be maintained at all times. We understand these are beautiful areas and places of pride for the community and a place where people come from all over the city to play and walk and take in the beauty. The elevated guideway will be built on the boulevard next to Eglinton Avenue West therefore no infrastructure will be built in the parks itself. This is a brand new line so we are able to take advantage of the most modern technology and thinking in terms of design to address the sound of new transit in a community.

The noise and vibration modelling that has been done to date does not anticipate any significant rise in levels compared to what exists today along Eglinton. Noise and vibration from electrified service like this is mainly from the wheel on rail contact and there are several ways to address that at the track level, through the design:

Continuously welded rail – eliminates joints that cause clanking

Resiliently supported rail ties – plastic pads between the rail and the track bed

High-grade rail fasteners and rail dampers – attach to the rails and compress the tracks parts to absorb vibration

Automated trains – allow for much more precise braking, which reduces the sound associated with a train slowing as it approaches a station

Regular wheel maintenance – to take care of wheel flats and other structural wear and tear that can cause a thumping sound.

We appreciate that this is a large piece of infrastructure and a big change in the community but we will continue working with the community on the design as well as opportunities for public realm improvements underneath. We will have more information later this year so please stay tuned. 

Anonymous's avatar

Metrolinx keeps repeating that tunneling under the Humber River has many challenges that are too hard to overcome. I would like to ask, which companies were responsible for the "Big Dig" at Union Station and the construction of the pedestrian tunnel to Billy Bishop Airport under Lake Ontario? Compared to these 2 projects, digging under the narrow Humber River should be a piece of cake. Metrolinx should give the ECWE job to these other companies instead of deliberately sticking with a clearly incompetent contractor. What is going on??

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 16:23

The key consideration is that the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. Tunnelling would require building underneath three flood-prone waterways (under the Humber River) and present significant environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Elevating the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension between Scarlett Road and Jane Street eliminates these challenges and will help to prevent potential service disruptions along the corridor during times of heavy rain and flooding.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 21, 2021 - 18:39

Your previous question and answer sessions have produced questions which resulted in a standard answer of directing the person asking the question to submit their comments or questions to the TTC instead of you. Going forward can't you find a way to include a TTC representative in these ECWE meetings to answer these questions or to at least give an indication on how the TTC plan to incorporate and complement their service with the ECWE?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 16:52

It is true that while we’re designing the project, we meet with the City of Toronto and TTC regularly and coordinate our work. We are all working towards seamless between the LRT and the surface/bus service now and in the future, which is key to the success of this project and the easy transfers at stations that we talk about. We would be happy to include TTC at a future engagement and have already shared this with them. They may have another way to share the information but having us all in the same spot at the same time is a good idea that we will follow up.

Anonymous's avatar

Like a previous comment said, the section thru Etobicoke was originally supposed to be at-grade. Let's have the community think of who benefited the most from making it into a tunneled alignment. It wasn't the residents, the environment, or even transit users. In fact the biggest winners were the billionaire owners responsible for the development of townhouses along the corridor. If it's going to actually cost an additional $1.1 billion to dig a tunnel under the Humber River ($4.7B to $5.8B according to Metrolinx), why doesn't Metrolinx get the billionaire owners to pay for it?

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 11:52

Is it possible to make this extension underground completely

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 17:22

We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case, including a fully tunneled option. The mixed alignment with 7 stations that we’re moving forward with is estimated to cost $4.7billion. The fully tunneled option with 9 stations is estimated at $5.8B. The mixed alignment we’re moving forward with provides the highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs. There are also challenges to fully tunneling, since the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. While all solutions are technically feasible, tunnelling would require building underneath the Humber River, which presents environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Underground stations at Scarlett and Jane would require excavating approximately 30m under the Humber which is twice the depth of the other underground stations. This would cause more intense and longer local community construction impacts. For context, it would be 10+m deeper than the excavation that’s happened for stations at Yonge Station and Cedarvale Station (Allen Road) on the ECLRT.  Elevating the ECWE over the Humber River eliminates these challenges, and the potential for unforeseen conflicts with such deep underground conditions, while delivering more benefits.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 13:02

I am very concerned with the plan to build the proposed elevated section. The harm that the bridge will have on the environment and wildlife is obvious, but Metrolinx keeps refusing to address a very important point, and that is the physical and mental health of residents who will be affected by this bridge. Can you imagine the people trying to leisurely walk through the park with a train zooming by overhead every 5 minutes? It will be impossible for residents to refresh their minds and take in the beauty of nature if all of their senses are blocked out by a large concrete bridge with trains and electric wires. This is the reason why the Gardiner bridge needed to be demolished, even at a high cost. With a tunnel under the Humber River, all of this can easily be avoided, and we can keep the peace on the surface.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 17:13

We understand these are beautiful areas and places of pride for the community and a place where people come from all over the city to play and walk and take in the beauty. The elevated guideway will be built on the boulevard next to Eglinton Avenue West therefore no infrastructure will be built in the parks itself. This is a brand new line so we are able to take advantage of the most modern technology and thinking in terms of design to address the sound of new transit in a community.

The noise and vibration modelling that has been done to date does not anticipate any significant rise in levels compared to what exists today along Eglinton. Noise and vibration from electrified service like this is mainly from the wheel on rail contact and there are several ways to address that at the track level, through the design:

Continuously welded rail – eliminates joints that cause clanking

Resiliently supported rail ties – plastic pads between the rail and the track bed

High-grade rail fasteners and rail dampers – attach to the rails and compress the tracks parts to absorb vibration

Automated trains – allow for much more precise braking, which reduces the sound associated with a train slowing as it approaches a station

Regular wheel maintenance – to take care of wheel flats and other structural wear and tear that can cause a thumping sound.

We appreciate that this is a large piece of infrastructure and a big change in the community but we will continue working with the community on the design as well as opportunities for public realm improvements underneath. We will have more information later this year so please stay tuned. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 28, 2021 - 19:30

Metrolinx has the time and money to return to the original fully tunnelled option, do the right thing!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 17:23

We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case, including a fully tunneled option. The mixed alignment with 7 stations that we’re moving forward with is estimated to cost $4.7billion. The fully tunneled option with 9 stations is estimated at $5.8B. The mixed alignment we’re moving forward with provides the highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs. There are also challenges to fully tunneling, since the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. While all solutions are technically feasible, tunnelling would require building underneath the Humber River, which presents environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Underground stations at Scarlett and Jane would require excavating approximately 30m under the Humber which is twice the depth of the other underground stations. This would cause more intense and longer local community construction impacts. For context, it would be 10+m deeper than the excavation that’s happened for stations at Yonge Station and Cedarvale Station (Allen Road) on the ECLRT.  Elevating the ECWE over the Humber River eliminates these challenges, and the potential for unforeseen conflicts with such deep underground conditions, while delivering more benefits.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 28, 2021 - 19:13

You're talking about preventing bird deaths, but how can you expect birds to be able to avoid the power lines and electric poles high along the bridge?

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 28, 2021 - 20:09

There were many great questions posted but not answered during the meeting. For the questions that were, it seemed like all we got were shallow responses. If meeting attendees agree with this then use your votes here to show your dissatisfaction.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 28, 2021 - 19:09

You just said that because of covid, there hasn't been any meaningful community discussion prior to your Initial Business Case. Are you saying that you decided the entire plan by yourself without public consultation????

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 28, 2021 - 19:07

With the small section at Pearen Park and Fergy Brown Park, you are already killing many trees with the portal to the bridge. Now the new access road will have to cut down even more trees in the same area. Look at the yellow dashes on the map!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:30

Metrolinx will continue to work with residents and community groups to minimize the impacts of construction whenever possible, and ensure we’re restoring and improving community spaces once construction is complete. We don’t yet know how many trees will need to be protected or removed from the parkland in both Fergy Brown and Pearen parks, we are first looking  to design the project in a way that protects as many trees as possible and replaces those that must be removed to construct the project safely. A full inventory of trees within the project area, including Fergy Brown Park and Pearen Park, and an assessment of their health is underway now. Once that report is complete, we will share the results with the community. We know that some trees will need to be removed to safely build and operate the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension, but we will strive to keep that to an absolute minimum.

In the meantime. we continue to move forward with replanting and revegetation initiatives, including an event on October 20 with the TRCA where 400 new trees were planted along the Humber River. By planting trees now, they will have ten years to grow before the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension even opens, which will help preserve and strengthen tree cover in the community. Metrolinx will continue to work with the Toronto and Region Conservation Authority and the City of Toronto on new planting initiatives next year.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 15, 2021 - 19:47

It is all well and good that the LRT will provide connections between TTC, Up Express, MiWay, Go Buses at Renforth etc but having to pay twice to move from system to system is expensive for workers on a tight budget. Will Metrolinx recommend to the Government ways to mitigate the cost of a trip between two systems, such as a trip from Martingrove to Mississauga City Centre?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 17:33

Fare integration is an important ongoing discussion. The ECWE Initial Business Case used the current fare structure – which does not consider fare integration – and we know that with better fare integration the user experience will improve, and we would see even more people use transit. Most 905 area transit agencies currently have fare integration with each other and GO transit. Metrolinx continues to work with the Ministry of Transportation and municipal partners on options to better integrate fare systems. Since 2018, Metrolinx has introduced programs such as Kids GO Free, Sunday Funday (unlimited travel for $10) and lowered short-distance fares for GO Transit. We working with our partners towards a regional solution. 

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 28, 2021 - 18:17

To enhance a lot of safety on this extension for blind and low-vision passengers, I think that Jane and Royal York stations on this should have a island platform, while the rest of the stations have side platforms

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 17:48

Thank you for your comment. Information about station layout is in the early design stage. Stay tuned for a future engagement where we will provide more information for feedback.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 28, 2021 - 18:18

Since Jane & Scarlett stations are elevated, shouldn't they both have platform screen doors?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:00

Thank you for your comment. Information about station layout is in the early design stage. Stay tuned for a future engagement where we will provide more information for feedback.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 28, 2021 - 18:19

Are any stations mined?
If so, which one(s)?

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 28, 2021 - 18:13

Since Mount Dennis and Renforth stations are both below-grade, I suppose that while Mount Dennis station already has a center island platform, Renforth station should have side platforms even though it's the terminus station...for now.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 17:51

Thank you for your comment. Information about station layout is in the early design stage. Stay tuned for a future engagement where we will provide more information for feedback.

Anonymous's avatar

how will customers get from renforth to YYZ?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 17:50

An initial business case to extend the LRT to the airport is underway now. Stay tuned! We will have more information when that work is complete. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 20:05

this 5-min. video is too important to not watch and it will tell you why you should have 1 fare for all GTHA:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5IK5lLUniE

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 18, 2021 - 13:59

I believe in one of your meeting a few months back we were advised that we will see some station designs in the fall, but nothing has been shown yet.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:32

Engagements relating to stations will begin later this early or early next year. We look forward to bringing more information to the community for feedback. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 07:30

can Richview Road be extended to have an exit and entrance from Eglinton?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 23, 2021 - 00:04

Is there wifi on the LRT vehicles and stations?

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 24, 2021 - 12:22

There were a lot of complaints about noise and tremors being felt by neighbours where the Eglinton east extension was built. What will be done to address these issues in the west?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 17:56

The noise and vibration modelling that has been done to date does not anticipate any significant rise in levels compared to what exists today along Eglinton. Noise and vibration from electrified service like this is mainly from the wheel on rail contact and there are several ways to address that at the track level, through the design:

Continuously welded rail – eliminates joints that cause clanking

Resiliently supported rail ties – plastic pads between the rail and the track bed

High-grade rail fasteners and rail dampers – attach to the rails and compress the tracks parts to absorb vibration

Automated trains – allow for much more precise braking, which reduces the sound associated with a train slowing as it approaches a station

Regular wheel maintenance – to take care of wheel flats and other structural wear and tear that can cause a thumping sound.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 21, 2021 - 20:42

Note: If you're gonna build this extension, then it's important you use only 1 fare for all the GTHA.

And this video will tell you why: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h5IK5lLUniE

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:19

Fare integration is an important ongoing discussion. The ECWE Initial Business Case used the current fare structure – which does not consider fare integration – and we know that with better fare integration the user experience will improve, and we would see even more people use transit. Most 905 area transit agencies currently have fare integration with each other and GO transit. Metrolinx continues to work with the Ministry of Transportation and municipal partners on options to better integrate fare systems. Since 2018, Metrolinx has introduced programs such as Kids GO Free, Sunday Funday (unlimited travel for $10) and lowered short-distance fares for GO Transit. We working with our partners towards a regional solution. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 23, 2021 - 00:03

Do any of the new stations provide quick access to a Go Train that would take you to Union Station?

Anonymous's avatar

Last meeting, someone asked about planting trees on the LRT bridge, but the question wasn't answered because you thought the poster was kidding. However, they might not have been kidding because it is true that the current plan will result in too much concrete in York South-Weston, first with the Black Creek bridge and then the Humber River bridge. This is why the City encourages people to plant trees on the roofs of high-rise buildings. Can we expect the same for the Humber River bridge?

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 27, 2021 - 11:50

Will this extension really go to Pearson airport or is it going to Renforth

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:03

The initial business case for the airport extension is currently underway. The extension is unfunded at this moment, but the business case will provide more insight into what’s required including estimated costs.The government is committed to moving the work forward so stay tuned! 

W. K. Lis's avatar
Sep 13, 2021 - 12:58

Will there be more than one elevator per platform, between levels? In case one elevator is out-of-service, people could still use the other elevator, to keep it being accessible for all.

Ditto for the escalators? More than one escalator in each direction, total four (two in each direction). Would be better if all the stations be centre platforms.

W. K. Lis's avatar
Sep 17, 2021 - 15:06

Will the stations include knockout panels, so that neighouring current or future buildings could connect with the stations underground (or even elevated)? Even provide knockouts for any next century rapid transit lines, to provide easier connections?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 22, 2021 - 19:14

will Renforth station have a bus terminal?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:22

The Renforth station will be located near the existing Renforth station at the eastern terminus of the 19km Mississauga Transitway. The new station will be designed and built for a seamless customer experience. It will be a mix of underground/above ground like the BRT route is already, with a direct connection between stations. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 24, 2021 - 11:00

I live at the corner of Eglinton and Scarlett. Just wondering where the station/stop would be located for Scarlett road.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:08

The Scarlett-Eglinton Station will be an elevated station located on the north side over Scarlett Road on the guideway. You can find the station location maps on our website here

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 15, 2021 - 19:55

Where does the earth go that you excavate from the tunnels when they are being built? Can it be deposited somewhere to create a feature such as a toboggan hill or another similar legacy leisure feature at a local park ?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:05

Good suggestion. We can look at opportunities for the Mount Dennis tunnel section. We’ll take that back to our environmental team. During excavation of the tunnels from Renforth to Scarlett, all reusable soil is distributed to licensed receiving soil management companies that recycle it for other infrastructure or construction projects in the GTA. The unusable or contaminated soil is sent to the dump.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 21, 2021 - 21:25

Wait, Won't this extension replace the 900 Airport Express bus?

Anonymous's avatar

Before they build more houses and narrow the Eglinton corridor can we add dedicated lanes for right turns so that flowthrough traffic can keep moving and not blocking Eglinton ?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:33

Thank you for your comment. We have shared this with the Crosstown team. 

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 23, 2021 - 00:20

A lot of people are making the comment that there was enough space above ground to built the extension there... as you are committed to building the LRT underground could this above ground space be ( quickly and cheaply) adapted for a bus only lane to speed up surface trips now? It would thus provide another alternative to the current state of affairs and could be delivered well before the completion of the LRT West extension thus mitigating the ten year wait.

Kevin's avatar
Sep 13, 2021 - 20:10

When will we see preliminary station designs. Will all the stations be exactly the same colour (like the rest of the line) or are you planning to make wayfinding easier by having stations that are different colours and, therefore, more easily distinguished from each other?

W. K. Lis's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 17:58

The original name of Eglinton Avenue West was the Richview Sideroad. Any chance the original name could be used for one of the stations?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:35

Thank you for your suggestion. We have a policy for naming of stations. We start with the simplest name possible – usually the name of the cross street. In this project, most of those names are already taken for Line 2. Through our policy and framework, we then start looking at other names related to the community or local landmarks. We’re not there yet. We look forward to getting the community’s feedback on proposed names as we are further along in the process!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:35

Thank you for your suggestion. We have a policy for naming of stations. We start with the simplest name possible – usually the name of the cross street. In this project, most of those names are already taken for Line 2. Through our policy and framework, we then start looking at other names related to the community or local landmarks. We’re not there yet. We look forward to getting the community’s feedback on proposed names as we are further along in the process!

Kevin's avatar

Kevin
Sep 13, 2021 - 20:12

How many new LRVs will need to be purchased, will the increased ridership mean increased train length? What is the maximum train length permitted on the line?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 21, 2021 - 21:38

Since the future Renforth LRT station will be below grade, how will it connect Mississauga Transitway?

Will it be elevated over the transitway
or will you just use the good ol' tunnels to connect them

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:16

The Renforth station will be located near the existing Renforth station at the eastern terminus of the 19km Mississauga Transitway. The new station will be designed and built for a seamless customer experience. It will be a mix of underground/above ground like the BRT route is already, with a direct connection between stations. Information about station layout including station entrances is in the early design stage. Stay tuned for a future engagement where we will provide more information for feedback.

W. K. Lis's avatar

Have they looked into adding colour pigment to the concrete, so we can something other than grey (or gray) as the main colour scheme? Not paint, since paint will wear out. Also include other more colourful finishes, again other than the 50 shades of grey, white, or black.

W. K. Lis's avatar
Sep 13, 2021 - 12:54

Will the stairways have bicycle runnels? It's a straight and usually grooved guide next to a stairway so people can go up and down without having to lift and carry their bikes. You just guide your bike wheels into the groove and push it up or squeezed the brakes and walk it down.

What about wheelchair and stroller runnels or ramps? When the power goes out, and are unable to use the elevators or escalators?

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 14, 2021 - 10:01

I am wondering if the cost savings are priority for putting the Ontario Line One above the ground in Lesliville, how come the cost saving is not a consideration here and there is a large portion underground proposed while there are swaths of land that can be used? How come the speed is of more concern here but not for a 2-3 KM stretch of Lesliville?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:15

Both the Ontario Line and the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension projects feature a mix of at-grade, elevated and underground elements. Decisions on alignments take into account a number of factors, including costs, integration with other transit, community impacts, deliverability and operations, and topography, which are unique to each project. There are numerous benefits to running the Ontario Line above ground in key areas, including leveraging existing rail corridor infrastructure and creating two more seamless transfer points between local and regional transit at the future East Harbour GO Station and at Exhibition GO Station, to name a few.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 17, 2021 - 22:53

Hold it. isn't cut-and cover tunnels considered as low-cost tunneling?
something like the Canada line in Vancouver for example?

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 21, 2021 - 21:35

since th' future Jane LRT will connect to this extension at Jane station (although we never know when you will build the new Jane LRT), it all makes sense that you can rename:

Jane to Eglinton west since the TTC Eglinton West station on line 1 is renamed to Cedarvale

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:13

Thank you for your suggestion. We have not finalized station names yet. The current names that are being used are working names. We have a policy for naming of stations. We start with the simplest name possible – usually the name of the cross street. In this project, most of those names are already taken for Line 2. Through our policy and framework, we then start looking at other names related to the community or local landmarks. We’re not there yet. We look forward to getting the community’s feedback on proposed names as we are further along in the process.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 17, 2021 - 22:47

can't you pick any other colors for the urban tapestry of this extension instead of orange, grey, and black?

Suggestions: green, blue, red, beige, white

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 21, 2021 - 22:18

Just like the existing under construction LRT line, you can just name the underground stations except Renforth be the nearby neighbourhoods.

1. Royal York renamed to Westmount
2. Islington renamed to Richmond Gardens
3. Kipling renamed to Richview Park
4. Martin Grove renamed to Willowridge

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 1, 2021 - 18:12

Thank you for your suggestions. We have not finalized station names yet. The current names that are being used are working names. We have a policy for naming of stations. We start with the simplest name possible – usually the name of the cross street. In this project, most of those names are already taken for Line 2. Through our policy and framework, we then start looking at other names related to the community or local landmarks. We’re not there yet. We look forward to getting the community’s feedback on proposed names as we are further along in the process.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 21, 2021 - 20:39

It's clear that using two boring machines is the wrong idea to tunnel. how?

center island platforms don't provide safety for blind passengers at all, especially when blind people can't find any walls to lean so they can wait for their train.

Now this is another reason why you should use cut-and-cover tunnelling or 1 giant boring machine from Ottawa