> Eglinton Crosstown West Extension LIVE | Metrolinx Engage

Eglinton Crosstown West Extension LIVE

On August 19, Metrolinx hosted a virtual open house focused on answering questions from the public. Representatives from the Metrolinx project team and our constructors, the West End Connectors provided a brief update on the work progressing at the launch shaft site at Renforth and answered as many questions as possible during the session.

In case you missed the event, you’ll find the answers in the video recording below. We also received additional questions during the virtual session and are committed to answering those as well. Answers will be posted at the bottom of this page.

 

 

 

Call-In With Your Question

As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we are adding a call-in option for tonight’s event. To ask your question by voice, join the Zoom meeting here. We aim to keep each question and subsequent answer to 3 minutes allowing for as many call-in questions as possible.

NOTE: please ensure you have the latest version of Zoom installed.

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Agenda

6:30PM: Meeting begins

6:35PM: ECWE Project Update

6:50PM: Questions and Answers

7:25PM: Wrap up

Meet the Speakers

Fernando Triana

Fernando Triana

Project Director (WEC)

Photo of John Potter

John Potter

Design Manager (Metrolinx)

Joshua Engel-Yan

Joshua Engel-Yan

ECWE Program Sponsor (Metrolinx)

Photo of Kelly Thornton

Kelly Thornton

Manager Community Engagement (Metrolinx)

Photo of Peter Olak

Peter Olak

ECWE Technical Director (Metrolinx)

Rick Mosher

Rick Mosher

Senior Technical Support - Environment (WEC)

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar

And what were the findings of the surveys? What impacts will be caused to the natural areas located below the proposed elevated section and the animals that live there? There is parkland, forested areas, wetlands and a creek running along the North side of Eglinton from east of Jane towards the Humber River, that many deer, coyotes, and many different species of birds and amphibians call home.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 13:48

Additional environmental assessments were completed in 2020 across the whole transit corridor and you can review those documents on our website and give us a call anytime if you would like to review them together. http://www.metrolinx.com/en/aboutus/publications/environmental_assessmen...

In the meantime, we are also conducting more surveys now as the design has progressed and that work includes more environmental field work, cultural heritage assessments and tree inventory/arborist reports. When this updated analysis is complete later this year we will share the information with the community. The elevated guideway will be built on the boulevard adjacent Eglinton Avenue West. We know there will be impacts to trees on the boulevard and the slope. The tree inventory is underway now and we are working with TRCA to find opportunities to plant new trees in the area as soon as possible, long before construction begins. We have also designed the bridge over the Humber River to clear-span the waterway so piers will not be built in the river. We will have an update on all of this information later this year so please stay tuned. In case you missed it, our June 8 virtual engagement included renderings and information that can also help address your areas of concern. 

Anonymous's avatar

Canadian winters will make the LRT unusable because the elevated section will be exposed to extreme weather. Why can't this section be tunneled instead so that our tax dollars aren't wasted maintaining a giant concrete bridge that nobody wanted in the first place?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 13:05

Safety is at the forefront of the design process so as always we’re thinking ahead with this in mind as we work through the options. Elevated rapid transit is already a proven solution in cold weather cities across the world, in Calgary, Edmonton, and the TTC’s existing subways here in Toronto. Essentially this is a bridge and there are many existing examples here and around the world of how inclement weather is managed to keep traffic or transit moving safely on bridges while protecting spaces underneath. For the most part, the LRT vehicles will help keep the tracks clear of snow and a drainage system will keep ice from building up. We’ll have more details at a near future engagement on the updated elevated guideway design so please stay tuned!

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 16, 2021 - 13:42

Metrolinx has responded to multiple questions asking about the elevated section with this exact quote: "The mixed alignment moving forward provides an optimal trade-off between the ease of local access and the speed of travelling, and outperforms all other options in offering the best network connectivity and travel experience for people living and travelling along the corridor." Whether the line runs underground or elevated does not change that it will still run along, and have an effect on, the area in proximity to Eglinton, so network connectivity should not be an issue unless stations are deliberately being removed in a fully underground alignment. In addition, the community would please like you to clarify what benefits the elevated section may have (if at all) for people living in the surrounding area. The only trade-off mentioned is between local access and travel speed, so us concerned taxpaying residents would like more information as to what we are expecting to gain in exchange for the downsides of an elevated alignment.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 12:56

We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case, including a fully tunneled option. The mixed alignment with 7 stations that we’re moving forward with is estimated to cost $4.7billion. The fully tunneled option with 9 stations is estimated at $5.8B. The mixed alignment we’re moving forward with provides the highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs. There are also challenges to fully tunneling, since the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. While all solutions are technically feasible, tunnelling would require building underneath the Humber River, which presents environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Underground stations at Scarlett and Jane would require excavating approximately 30m under the Humber which is twice the depth of the other underground stations. This would cause more intense and longer local community construction impacts. For context, it would be 10+m deeper than the excavation that’s happened for stations at Yonge Station and Cedarvale Station (Allen Road) on the ECLRT. Elevating the ECWE over the Humber River eliminates these challenges, and the potential for unforeseen conflicts with such deep underground conditions, while delivering more benefits.

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 18, 2021 - 17:33

The ECWE should be built to last for a very long time, at least 100 years. We should learn from the "mistake by the lake" that is the Gardiner Expressway and build the entire line underground, so that we won't have to spend more taxpayer money to demolish the above-grade section after only a few decades. Are we going to put out the fire before it spreads or are we going to force future generations to be responsible for covering this cost?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 13:08

We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case, including a fully tunneled option. The mixed alignment with 7 stations that we’re moving forward with is estimated to cost $4.7billion. The fully tunneled option with 9 stations is estimated at $5.8B. The mixed alignment we’re moving forward with provides the highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs. There are also challenges to fully tunneling, since the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. While all solutions are technically feasible, tunnelling would require building underneath the Humber River, which presents environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Underground stations at Scarlett and Jane would require excavating approximately 30m under the Humber which is twice the depth of the other underground stations. This would cause more intense and longer local community construction impacts. For context, it would be 10+m deeper than the excavation that’s happened for stations at Yonge Station and Cedarvale Station (Allen Road) on the ECLRT. Elevating the ECWE over the Humber River eliminates these challenges, and the potential for unforeseen conflicts with such deep underground conditions, while delivering more benefits.

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 19, 2021 - 00:20

What is the cost of building one launch shaft and one extraction shaft for the TBMs?

Anonymous's avatar

TTC is closing the above ground Scarborough RT line, due to increasing infrastructure failures. Extreme temperatures and inclement weather, combined with failing equipment have negatively impacted service. Millions have been spent on overhauls. Going back to the original plans, keeping the ECWE underground instead of 1.5 km above ground tracks and stations between Scarlett Road and Fergy brown Park will save tax payers money and provide better service in the long run. Why cut costs and sacrifice parkland in Mount Dennis?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 13:22

The elevated guideway will be built on the boulevard beside Eglinton Avenue West not in the park. 

We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case, including a fully tunneled option. The mixed alignment with 7 stations that we’re moving forward with is estimated to cost $4.7billion. The fully tunneled option with 9 stations is estimated at $5.8B. The mixed alignment we’re moving forward with provides the highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs. There are also challenges to fully tunneling, since the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. While all solutions are technically feasible, tunnelling would require building underneath the Humber River, which presents environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Underground stations at Scarlett and Jane would require excavating approximately 30m under the Humber which is twice the depth of the other underground stations. This would cause more intense and longer local community construction impacts. For context, it would be 10+m deeper than the excavation that’s happened for stations at Yonge Station and Cedarvale Station (Allen Road) on the ECLRT.  Elevating the ECWE over the Humber River eliminates these challenges, and the potential for unforeseen conflicts with such deep underground conditions, while delivering more benefits.

Anonymous's avatar

How many trees through Eglinton Flats Park will be removed to make way for the overhead tracks? Will they be replaced?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 13:16

The elevated guideway will be built on the boulevard next to Eglinton Avenue West therefore no infrastructure will be built in the park itself. There will be tree impacts on the boulevard and the slope and we are working through the design now to understand what that full impact will be. We understand these are beautiful areas and places of pride for the community and a place where people come from all over the city to play and walk and take in the beauty. We share concerns about tree loss and that’s why we’re working with the TRCA to find places in the area to start planting now, instead of waiting for the project to be completed. Trees planted before construction begins will have grown significantly by the time service begins. Right now, we are in the midst of a full tree inventory which will tell us what trees would be impacted and we will share that information with the community when that work is complete. We're striving to avoid impacts to trees as much as possible while we finalize the alignment of the elevated guideway and will have more information in the fall so please stay tuned.

Anonymous's avatar

How will you address the concerns in your plans and actions, specifically in regards to our concerns regarding the destruction of the trees and natural environment of Eglinton Flats? The natural space of the Flats is at the heart of this community and our neighbourhood and we do not want that disturbed by any means, nor have we ever agreed to that. The change of plans is a radical change that is destructive to our quality of life, and to the natural environment of the area. The proposed change will significantly alter the noise levels, air quality, what we see every day and how we live.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 13:28

The elevated guideway will be built on the boulevard next to Eglinton Avenue West therefore no infrastructure will be built in the park itself. There will be tree impacts on the boulevard and the slope and we are working through the design now to understand what that full impact will be. We understand these are beautiful areas and places of pride for the community and a place where people come from all over the city to play and walk and take in the beauty. We share concerns about tree loss and that’s why we’re working with the TRCA to find places in the area to start planting now, instead of waiting for the project to be completed. Trees planted before construction begins will have grown significantly by the time service begins. Right now, we are in the midst of a full tree inventory which will tell us what trees would be impacted and we will share that information with the community when that work is complete. We're striving to avoid impacts to trees as much as possible while we finalize the alignment of the elevated guideway and will have more information in the fall so please stay tuned. 

The noise and vibration modelling that has been done to date does not anticipate any significant rise in levels compared to what exists today along Eglinton. Noise and vibration from electrified service like this is mainly from the wheel on rail contact and there are several ways to address that at the track level, through the design:

  • Continuously welded rail – eliminates joints that cause clanking
  • Resiliently supported rail ties – plastic pads between the rail and the track bed
  • High-grade rail fasteners and rail dampers – attach to the rails and compress the tracks parts to absorb vibration
  • Automated trains – allow for much more precise braking, which reduces the sound associated with a train slowing as it approaches a station
  • Regular wheel maintenance – to take care of wheel flats and other structural wear and tear that can cause a thumping sound.
Anonymous's avatar

what is the rationale for metrolinx to choose to build the elevated section in a green space that the community members use to keep themselves physically and mentally healthy. This will have a great financial impact on health services usage especially mental health services and emergency services.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 13:18

The elevated guideway will be built on the boulevard beside Eglinton Avenue West, not through the park. 

We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case, including a fully tunneled option. The mixed alignment with 7 stations that we’re moving forward with is estimated to cost $4.7billion. The fully tunneled option with 9 stations is estimated at $5.8B. The mixed alignment we’re moving forward with provides the highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs. There are also challenges to fully tunneling, since the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. While all solutions are technically feasible, tunnelling would require building underneath the Humber River, which presents environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Underground stations at Scarlett and Jane would require excavating approximately 30m under the Humber which is twice the depth of the other underground stations. This would cause more intense and longer local community construction impacts. For context, it would be 10+m deeper than the excavation that’s happened for stations at Yonge Station and Cedarvale Station (Allen Road) on the ECLRT. Elevating the ECWE over the Humber River eliminates these challenges, and the potential for unforeseen conflicts with such deep underground conditions, while delivering more benefits.

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 16, 2021 - 16:08

Will there be a lot of green space removed to accommodate the extension along Egl W from Mount Dennis to Jane? Its a beautiful green space with tree' and wild life in abundance. Even saw a deer roaming in there. Keelesdale Park is a mess with the supplies and temp trailers set up. ( for sure necessary ) Just wondering about the little park.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 13:29

The elevated guideway will be built on the boulevard next to Eglinton Avenue West therefore no infrastructure will be built in the park itself.

There will be tree impacts on the boulevard and the slope and we are working through the design now to understand what that full impact will be. We understand these are beautiful areas and places of pride for the community and a place where people come from all over the city to play and walk and take in the beauty. We share concerns about tree loss and that’s why we’re working with the TRCA to find places in the area to start planting now, instead of waiting for the project to be completed. Trees planted before construction begins will have grown significantly by the time service begins. Right now, we are in the midst of a full tree inventory which will tell us what trees would be impacted and we will share that information with the community when that work is complete. We're striving to avoid impacts to trees as much as possible while we finalize the alignment of the elevated guideway and will have more information in the fall so please stay tuned.

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 19, 2021 - 18:58

You mentioned that Metrolinx was worried about the effects of having a station 30m underground (Scarlett/Jane). The Metro in Washington DC has stations up to 60m deep with no problems, and that was built decades ago with older technology. Shouldn't the technology available today be able to handle a station only half as deep?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:00

Great question! Yes it's true it is feasible to build under the Humber River and maintain very deep stations. We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case for the ECWE, including a fully tunneled option. Decisions on alignments take into account a number of factors, including integration with other transit, community benefits and impacts, deliverability, operations and costs, and topography, which are unique to each project. The mixed alignment we're moving forward with provides an optimal trade-off between the ease of local access and the speed of travelling, and outperforms all other options in offering the best network connectivity and travel experience for people living and travelling along the corridor.

Anonymous's avatar

The route between Renforth and Martingrove is the longest stretch without a station. What will the surface bus service frequency be on Eglinton between those two stations for those who need to travel East from the Eringate neighbourhood on Eglinton (and return)? Is the expectation that these residents ride the West Mall bus to Renforth Station and then head East? There are concerns that getting on the West Mall bus and joining rush hour traffic to get to Renforth Station then ride the LRT East, will take as long as actually walking to Martingrove Station. Hence the question about having frequent / speedy surface service on Eglinton for Eringate residents.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:20

Part of our work with the City of Toronto and TTC includes looking at opportunities for better connections and coordinating services. However, current and future TTC schedules and routes are ultimately determined by the TTC therefore we have already shared your questions/comment with TTC. If you would like to continue having a discussion about this it would be best done by contacting TTC customer service directly.

Anonymous's avatar

In May the federal government added $12 billion to four transit projects including ECWE. What is the cost comparison of continued tunnelling under Eglinton to Mount Dennis station vs realignment of Eglinton Avenue to accommodate the elevated guideway? Keeping a 1.5 km section underground will save infrastructure costs, greenbelt parklands, trees and wildlife.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 13:31

The federal funding was provided to the project as it is currently designed with the mixed alignment of tunnel and elevated guideway. The guideway will be built on the boulevard adjacent Eglinton Avenue West, not in the park.

We considered a number of configurations in the Initial Business Case, including a fully tunneled option. The mixed alignment with 7 stations that we’re moving forward with is estimated to cost $4.7billion. The fully tunneled option with 9 stations is estimated at $5.8B. The mixed alignment we’re moving forward with provides the highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs. There are also challenges to fully tunneling, since the area between Scarlett Road and Jane Street is in an identified flood plain zone. While all solutions are technically feasible, tunnelling would require building underneath the Humber River, which presents environmental and technical challenges to building and operating the line. Underground stations at Scarlett and Jane would require excavating approximately 30m under the Humber which is twice the depth of the other underground stations. This would cause more intense and longer local community construction impacts. For context, it would be 10+m deeper than the excavation that’s happened for stations at Yonge Station and Cedarvale Station (Allen Road) on the ECLRT.  Elevating the ECWE over the Humber River eliminates these challenges, and the potential for unforeseen conflicts with such deep underground conditions, while delivering more benefits.

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 19, 2021 - 19:10

The government was the one who supplied taxpayer money to Metrolinx for the construction of the ECWE. Are you saying that Metrolinx has zero responsibility for how the money is being spent, and that the negative effects that will arise from the final decision are all the government's fault?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 2, 2021 - 12:50

When it comes to decisions related to transit planning and construction, the role of Metrolinx is to provide evidence, analysis, and advice to the Provincial government, who then makes decisions about how to allocate taxpayer dollars. This evidence, analysis and advice is communicated through the business case process, which is a comprehensive collection of evidence and analysis that sets out the rationale for why an investment should be made to solve a problem or address an opportunity. It’s part of an open and transparent decision making process. The business case lifecycle – the transition from options analysis to planning and design on a preferred option and finally to delivery and operations – relies on a progression of decisions to guide the advancement of an investment. You can learn more about the business case process here.

Metrolinx published an Initial Business Case for the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension, which explored several alignment options. The IBC evaluated each alignment across four key categories: strategic, economic, financial and deliverability and operations cases. 

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 13, 2021 - 01:03

For the Stations at Martin Grove, Kipling, Islington and Royal York, where will the station entrances and exits be located?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:23

Martin Grove – station box on the n/e corner. Islington – station box on the n/w corner. Royal York – station box on the n/w corner. For each of these three stations, the headwalls for the station box will be built outside of the right of way on their respective corners. Headwall construction will take place next year. Station building construction is later, expected to begin in 2024/25.

Kipling is the one station where the station box will be built in the right of way, underneath Eglinton, just west of Kipling. (You can see a map for the proposed station location on our website.) However, although the station box is below Eglinton, the station building itself where people access the transit service is envisioned on the north west corner. We are in the listening stage right now and we have heard from residents that traffic and tree protection in the area are both very important and so we’re working on balancing those priorities.  We are planning an engagement later this year to demonstrate the design process and options that we are looking at with the City of Toronto to find that best balance. Your input is important to this process so please stay tuned! 

 

Anonymous's avatar

The tunnels under the Thames River UK are used for road vehicles, pedestrians, Tube and railway lines and utilities. Several tunnels are over a century old: the original Thames Tunnel was the world's first underwater tunnel built in the 1800's.

Anonymous's avatar

Currently, road access to Scarlett Woods Golf Course is only from Eglinton Ave. west of Jane Street. Will that access still be maintained during the the construction of the Eglinton Crosstown West extension?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:28

Yes, access to the golf course will always be maintained. The construction of the elevated guideway will not impact that driveway. 

W. K. Lis's avatar

The 158 TRETHEWAY bus will replace the 32C Eglinton West Tretheway bus. It should depart Keelesdale Station, travel west Tretheway to Jane, north on Jane to Lawrence, west on Lawrence to Weston, and north on Weston to ---- Hill Drive. It will pass the Weston GO/UPX station.

See https://stevemunro.ca/2021/06/27/ttc-2022-service-plan-consultation/

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:19

Thank you! Questions about the delivery and scheduling of TTC service can also be addressed by contacting TTC customer service directly.

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 16, 2021 - 13:58

there are many toronto airport workers that live east of the airport that drive along the top of the city on the congested 401 - will it be possible to take transit from Don Mills area to YYZ airport? and when will this be possible. Thank you

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:31

The TTC has a helpful tool to help plan transit trips and includes connections to the UP Express. Try it out at: http://www.ttc.ca/Trip_planner/index.jsp   

Anonymous's avatar

on the northwest corner of Eglinton and Royal York

W. K. Lis's avatar
Aug 9, 2021 - 15:10

Will solar panels be incorporated for the surface station structures? Or will that be vetoed by the government?

In light of the UN 2021 Climate Change Report ( https://www.ipcc.ch/report/ar6/wg1/ ), that could be one portion we can do to combat global warming.

Action Jackson 's avatar
Aug 19, 2021 - 02:52

I think the huge question on most minds are the look of each station, and will it be as impactful as the station construction along the crosstown which is still going on. Specifically (Martingrove, Kipling, Jane) We are approaching fall, and so far no imagary has been shown to give us a glimpse of these future stations.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:52

Stay tuned for an engagement that will focus on station buildings! Station construction is expected to begin in approximately 2025 but we will have renderings and designs for review in the near future to ensure we get your input every step of the way. We're in the early design stage and will be ready to get your feedback soon. 

Anonymous's avatar

Specifically looking at the homes between Royal York Rd and Islington on the North side. These houses are on Hamptonbrook Drive and have backyards that back onto Eglinton. Will the green space be altered? Will there be significant construction? Will there be a station on the corner of Islington/Eglinton? Or just stairs to an underground access (like University/Queen)? Thank you.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:27

There will be a station building at the north/west corner of Islington/Eglinton and the north/west corner of Royal York. We’re in the early design of all the station buildings and listening to input from the community and the City of Toronto. We will use that input to develop a preliminary design and renderings that we will bring to the community for more engagement. There are minimum requirements that drive the size of a station in terms of safety, customer flow and amenities, utilities, elevators and escalators for example.  We won’t build stations any larger than they need to be. We are focused on ensuring that we make the best long-term investment that meets the needs of the community now and into the future. Construction of the station building will be outside the roadway at the northwest corners. You can view the station location map on our website under “neighbourhood updates” here. Right now, we are in the midst of a full tree inventory which will tell us what trees would be impacted and we will share that information with the community. Avoiding impacts to trees is the best-case scenario and we always strive to do that first, but there is also a lot of work happening now to plan for local tree planting as part of the compensation of tree loss. We expect to have more information in in the fall.

The station construction is expected to begin in 2024/25. However, headwalls for each station box will be constructed as part of the advanced tunnel contract in 2022 so there will be some construction next year, as well as the tunneling itself that will run under Eglinton and then veer to the north for the station area. Please call or email us anytime to discuss this further! 416-202-8001 [email protected] 

W. K. Lis's avatar

In reply to a previous question, the 32D bus will be replaced by the 170 bus, when the Line 5 opens.

I'm guessing they're asking what happens with the extension, will the 170 Emmett bus be gone. I think the 170 Emmett and the 171 Mount Dennis buses be combined. What the route would it take, we'll have to discuss. It could serve both Emmett Avenue and Lambton Avenue, as well as the Jane & Eglinton Station and Mt. Dennis Station

As for the name of "Jane & Eglinton", may I suggest "Eglinton Flats"?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:27

Part of our work with the City of Toronto and TTC includes looking at opportunities for better connections and coordinating services. However, current and future TTC schedules and routes are ultimately determined by the TTC therefore we have already shared your questions/comment with TTC. If you would like to continue having a discussion about this it would be best done by contacting TTC customer service directly.

Anonymous's avatar

Is the layout of the Renforth station going to share or provide easy access to Mississauga transit already present? Will there be parking added above ground for the station access?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:36

Yes, the station will provide a seamless transfer to the existing Renforth Terminal. We will have more information about the design of station buildings soon so please stay tuned, but rest assured that easy transfers between transit operators is top of mind in the design process. Parking lots are not being built at any of the new stations.

.

Anonymous's avatar

If more people will be residing along the ECWE and none of the major roadways are being expanded, will the city limit the number of the parking spots in the buildings that are going up along/near the ECWE so that the roads don't become even more congested than they already are?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:43

Decisions about development planning sit with the City of Toronto so if you would like more information we suggest calling 311. Thank you.

Anonymous's avatar

Once the elevated LRTs enter the Maintenance Yard at the end of their routes what type of noise abatements are planned to protect the surrounding communities? Are their noise abatement measures planned to protect the surrounding communities from undo noise disruptions as the elevated LRTs turn into the Maintenance Yard for storage and cleaning?

Anonymous's avatar

The schedule showed station headwall construction happening in 2022. Wouldn't starting that work now, in 2021, result in faster delivery of the project?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:03

This year work is concentrated on building the launch shaft for the tunnel boring machines and then work will move east along the corridor for the headwalls next year. However, we have been conducting geotechnical investigations ahead of the headwall construction and monitoring ground conditions, which is required before construction begins. So rest assured that work is happening along the corridor even if you can't see it! 

Anonymous's avatar

Where along Eglinton Avenue West LRT extension will the pocket tracks be located for possible disabled trains? Where will crossover tracks be located at the stations for short turns or entry or egress from the pocket tracks?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:07

There is one centre track west of Jane St. but no pocket tracks on the current ECWE alignment.  The centre track will be used for the short turn back operation between Laird St. and Jane St. but is not intended for use to store trains on a regular basis. Special trackworks for short turn back will also be located east of Renforth. Please call us if you need more information!  

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 12, 2021 - 10:32

In addition to the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension, there are multiple construction projects planned for the area at the same time, such as multiple, private condo/townhouse developments, and the redevelopment of Richview Plaza, on Eglinton Avenue, and, Sunrise Senior Living Residence (for 146 people) and the Humbertown redevelopment on Royal York Road. How are all of these construction projects going to be coordinated so that all of the construction traffic, from all of the construction projects, going on at the same time, does not cause traffic chaos in the area?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:41

We are meeting with City of Toronto on regular basis as the project design develops. Those discussions include assessing the potential traffic impacts to the local network so that our work can be taken into consideration with the wider community developments that the City needs to consider.

We understand and have heard from residents that having multiple project underway at the same time is concerning and so we will continue to work with the City on our plan and on any coordinated communications that may be necessary. We are committed to keeping residents directly informed as well so that you have the information in advance about any impacts such as changes to traffic. We'll continue to use all of our channels including regular engagements, mail drops, social media and the e-newsletter to keep you informed. 

Anonymous's avatar

Once the elevated LRTs enter the Maintenance Yard at the end of their routes what type of noise abatements are planned to protect the surrounding communities? Are their noise abatement measures planned to protect the surrounding communities from undo noise disruptions as the elevated LRTs turn into the Maintenance Yard for storage and cleaning?

Anonymous's avatar

If the pavement (and tunnel) on Eg is shifted to the south within the existing oversize 45 m row, it should be possible to effectively free up the 2 westbound lanes on either the NW or NE corner to allow for the station to be built on these now free westbound lanes thus avoiding the forest altogether. The entire travelled intersection would be jogged southerly by about 30 - 45 feet but the r.o.w. would remain as is. Why not???

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:56

Thank you! Your suggestion to realign Eglinton to the south has been shared with the team. 

Kipling is the one station where the station box will be built in the right of way, underneath Eglinton, just west of Kipling. (You can see a map for the proposed station location on our website.) The tunnel alignment is fixed and can not be shifted at this piont. However, although the station box is below Eglinton, the station building itself where people access the transit service is envisioned on the north west corner.We are in the listening stage right now. We have heard from residents that traffic and tree protection in the area are both very important and so we’re working on balancing those priorities.  We are planning an engagement later this year to demonstrate the design process and options that we are looking at with the City of Toronto to find that best balance. 

Anonymous's avatar

With new train stops at: Jane, Scarlett, The Eglinton 32D Bus will be eliminated.
Are the many seniors living on Emmett Ave going to have to walk in the winter snow and ice to either Scarlett or Jane stations?
Presently, the 32D bus stops in front of the buildings on Emmett. Eliminating the bus will add 15-20 minute walk to the nearest station in winter.
Some seniors I have talked to said they won't even attempt the walk and will be taking a taxi.
How will you remedy this reduced TTC service issue?
Thanks.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:32

Part of our work with the City of Toronto and TTC includes looking at opportunities for better connections and coordinating services. However, current and future TTC schedules and routes are ultimately determined by the TTC therefore we have already shared your questions/comment with TTC. If you would like to continue having a discussion about this it would be best done by contacting TTC customer service directly.

Anonymous's avatar

For residents whose homes back onto the north side of Eglinton and Royal York what controls and barriers will be in place to limit noise, dust and shaking from construction?

Anonymous's avatar

Leased space could mean retail or office (private and/or non-profit or government) which would be an asset.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:36

The province is exploring potential transit-oriented communities developments across the entire provincial subway program. Plans are not confirmed for the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension but you can learn more about the Province of Ontario's TOC plan here, and in case you’re interested, current opportunities being explored on the Ontario Line here. The TOC approach provides real opportunities to bring more housing and jobs closer to transit, and new services within walking distance in the communities we’re building in. Stay tuned for more information as the work by the province progresses!

Anonymous's avatar

I live close to Renforth and Eglinton and have to go to or through the present "Renforth" terminus. Will the new station have easier access to catch other buses?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:12

The new station at Renforth will be it's own station however it will be designed to provide seamless transfers with the existing transit services and the Mississauga Transitway Terminal. if that doesn't address your question please contact us directly! 

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:45

An initial business case to extend the LRT to the airport is underway now. Stay tuned! We will have more information when that work is complete. 

Anonymous's avatar

TTC is closing the above ground Scarborough RT line, due to increasing infrastructure failures. Extreme temperatures and inclement weather, combined with failing equipment have negatively impacted service. Millions have been spent on overhauls. Going back to the original plans, keeping the ECWE underground instead of 1.5 km above ground tracks and stations between Scarlett Road and Fergy brown Park will save tax payers money and provide better service in the long run. Why cut costs and sacrifice parkland in Mount Dennis?

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 19, 2021 - 19:01

Are there plans to plant trees on the elevated guideway to make up for loss of trees elsewhere?

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 19, 2021 - 20:06

According to Mr. Engel-Yan in the meeting, the politicians are the ones making the final decision, not Metrolinx. However, the government is not going to make the final decision blindly, but rather base it on advice from Metrolinx. This is why Metrolinx should be responsible for using the taxpayer money in the way people want it to be used.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 2, 2021 - 12:51

When it comes to decisions related to transit planning and construction, the role of Metrolinx is to provide evidence, analysis, and advice to the Provincial government, who then makes decisions about how to allocate taxpayer dollars. This evidence, analysis and advice is communicated through the business case process, which is a comprehensive collection of evidence and analysis that sets out the rationale for why an investment should be made to solve a problem or address an opportunity. It’s part of an open and transparent decision making process. The business case lifecycle – the transition from options analysis to planning and design on a preferred option and finally to delivery and operations – relies on a progression of decisions to guide the advancement of an investment. You can learn more about the business case process here.

Metrolinx published an Initial Business Case for the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension, which explored several alignment options. The IBC evaluated each alignment across four key categories: strategic, economic, financial and deliverability and operations cases.

Anonymous's avatar

When will we be notified of the change in bus routes affected by the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension, specifically Trethewey Drive between Eglinton Avenue West and Jane Street currently being serviced by the Eglinton 32C bus route?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:11

Part of our work with the City of Toronto and TTC includes looking at opportunities for better connections and coordinating services. However, current and future TTC schedules and routes are ultimately determined by the TTC therefore we have already shared your questions/comment with TTC. If you would like to continue having a discussion about this it would be best done by contacting TTC customer service directly.

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 13, 2021 - 01:05

How deep will the tunneling need to be under Highways 27, 401 and 427?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:31

We will tunnel under highways 427 and 27 at approximately 80 to 90 feet (approximately 20 meters).

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:29

Vehicle, pedestrian and cycling traffic will be safely maintained along Eglinton throughout the project. There will be periods of time at different spots along the corridor when temporary lane restrictions will need to be in place. A full schedule of impacts related to the tunneling contract that is underway now will be ready for your input at a near future engagement, long before any traffic impacts begin. If you have questions about a particular area please call us so we can provide more specific information. 

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 19, 2021 - 18:54

It seems that it is far faster and far less expensive to go with a LRT. Were you simply forced to give in to car advocates?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:17

There have been many discussions on how to deliver rapid transit along Eglinton West over the years. The mixed alignment moving forward for  provides highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs; it outperforms all other options in offering the best network connectivity and travel experience for people living and travelling along the corridor. Decisions on alignments take into account a number of factors, including integration with other transit, community benefits and impacts, deliverability, operations and costs, and topography, which are unique to each project. 

W. K. Lis's avatar

With the elevated Jane Station, will provision be included for a full grand union, three-quarter union, half union, or butterfly union at a level intersection with the future Jane LRT? Will there be an underpass or overpass intersection provision with the future Jane LRT? Could a temporary pocket track be used at the Jane Station that could be incorporated into the future Jane LRT?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:09

The new station at Jane St will be elevated, which will create an underpass for the roadway below. There is one centre track west of Jane St. but there are no planned pocket tracks along the alignment. The centre track will be used for the short turn back operation between Laird St. and Jane St. but is not intended to store trains on a regular basis. Please call if we have not addressed your question!  

W. K. Lis's avatar
Jul 21, 2021 - 17:52

Will the stations incorporated multi-use, multi-story buildings, that includes retail (dry cleaners, bank ATMs, shoe repair, barbers & hair salons, etc.), medical offices, small industrial (bicycle repair, auto repair), and residential (above the 3rd floor)? That is so that people can actually walk to and from the stations to them.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:33

The province is exploring potential transit-oriented communities developments across the entire provincial subway program. Plans are not confirmed for the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension but you can learn more about the Province of Ontario's TOC plan here, and in case you’re interested, current opportunities being explored on the Ontario Line here. The TOC approach provides real opportunities to bring more housing and jobs closer to transit, and new services within walking distance in the communities we’re building in. Stay tuned for more information as the work by the province progresses!

W. K. Lis's avatar

Instead of using crossover tracka before the terminal stations, use reversing tracks AFTER the terminal tracks. The train deposits arriving passengers in one platform and goes forward to the siding where it changes direction and then proceeds into a departure platform. Seen this done in Montréal.

Better than today on Toronto's subway, where we see trains slow down (sometimes stop) on the tracks and even the station before the terminal station.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:30

Thank you, we have shared your comment with the design team. 

Anonymous's avatar

Will the roadway be maintained to/from 25 and 39 Richview Rd be retained? Planned 1C Richview Rd. will be added to this roadway.
Without this roadway a massive traffic volume will affect residents in all those buildings plus 1A and 1B Richview.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:22

In order to build the elevated guideway we need to build an extraction shaft beginning next year and that requires realigning Eglinton Avenue to the south. The driveway does not need to close to do this work.

However, when construction of the elevated guideway begins the existing driveway will need to be closed permanently. That work is currently expected to begin in approximately 2024/25 but the schedule is still preliminary. We understand many residents in the buildings use the driveway today and we are working with the City of Toronto to fully understand the impact the closure will have to traffic in the area and map out a plan to address that. We are currently assessing the overall traffic and transportation network in this area. There are a host of potential mitigation measures that can be used if necessary – such as changes to signals to adjust flow, which in some cases does the trick. Other options can include extending turning lanes on to Scarlett or Eglinton to provide additional space. We're looking at all options and we will keep the community updated as the traffic impact analysis work is completed. We have a few years before the driveway would need to close so there is time to work together on the best way forward. We want to set up smaller group meetings with residents in the building to discuss the options so if you live there please contact us directly, we would like to keep this conversation going! [email protected] 416-202-8001

Anonymous's avatar

Will there be a direct route in which people on Eglinton Avenue West / Trethewey Drive can access the Weston Go / Up Express? As in a current example, the 32C Eglinton West bus should continue straight on Denison Road East at Jane St and Trethewey Drive (instead of turning right on Jane Street) to Weston Road, turn right on Weston Road to Lawrence Avenue West ( Weston Go Transit and UP Express stop), turn right on Lawrence and proceed east to Jane Street continuing on its current route eastbound. This would allow everyone on Eglinton Avenue West access to the Go transit and Toronto Airport without having to catch a connecting bus on Lawrence Avenue West.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 14:29

Part of our work with the City of Toronto and TTC includes looking at opportunities for better connections and coordinating services. However, current and future TTC schedules and routes are ultimately determined by the TTC therefore we have already shared your questions/comment with TTC. If you would like to continue having a discussion about this it would be best done by contacting TTC customer service directly.

Anonymous's avatar

The destruction of our greenbelt - wetlands - parks can't be justified.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:39

Thank you for your comment. To be clear, the elevated guideway is being built on the boulevard beside Eglinton Avenue West, not in or through the park space. 

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 4, 2021 - 12:07

How do they design the tunnel to mitigate rainwater? What size storm have they designed for (eg. 1 in 100 year storm)?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:19

The tunnel is being built 10-20 meters underground, which is deep enough to not be impacted by any environmental factors or weather conditions above the surface, including rainwater. The current systems in place that catch rainwater or prevent floods will not be impacted as the TBMs progress underneath Eglinton Ave West. The construction team is using a carefully designed tunneling method and have sophisticated software that monitors/surveys the construction area before work begins to ensure the tunnel is not impacting any existing sewer systems, utilities, or other underground structures during construction.

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 18, 2021 - 20:34

Can you tell us how the thinking has gone from a surface- level route to the elevated option, and what community consultation there has been on this aspect. Some years ago, I was at a city meeting in Mount Dennis where we were told city planners strongly had recommended a surface over elevated route and there was many points in favour of this from a planning perspective (cost, ease of accessibility to passengers among other reasons).

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:17

There have been many discussions on how to deliver rapid transit along Eglinton West over the years. The mixed alignment moving forward for  provides highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs; it outperforms all other options in offering the best network connectivity and travel experience for people living and travelling along the corridor. Decisions on alignments take into account a number of factors, including integration with other transit, community benefits and impacts, deliverability, operations and costs, and topography, which are unique to each project. 

Anonymous's avatar
Aug 18, 2021 - 17:35

I am just curious. Why is Metrolinx wasting so much money on COMPLETELY NEEDLESSLY UNDERGROUND construction. Eglinton Avenue West is wide enough to handle a surface LRT as it was originally supposed to be an expressway. There is NO logical reason for putting the line underground (or is this to satisfy a political agenda and NOT a community based decision). Is there some scientific reason why the Crosstown extension to the Airport MUST be underground and NOT on the surface?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Sep 1, 2021 - 15:16

There have been many discussions on how to deliver rapid transit along Eglinton West over the years. The mixed alignment moving forward for  provides highest ridership increase, travel time savings, and increases rapid transit access to the most jobs; it outperforms all other options in offering the best network connectivity and travel experience for people living and travelling along the corridor. Decisions on alignments take into account a number of factors, including integration with other transit, community benefits and impacts, deliverability, operations and costs, and topography, which are unique to each project.