> DSBRT Ellesmere LIVE VOH - September 23, 2021 | Metrolinx Engage

DSBRT Ellesmere LIVE VOH - September 23, 2021

Welcome to our online engagement platform for the Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) project.

The DSBRT project will allow for seamless connections with local transit networks, providing the residents of Scarborough more flexibility and choice to get where they need to go, faster and more reliably.

On Thursday, September 23rd, 2021 Metrolinx hosted a virtual open house for the Ellesmere Community, providing a brief presentation overviewing the most recent preliminary design plans for Scarborough, followed by a question and answer session.

We will be posting answers to the questions we were unable to get to during the event on this page. If you were unable to join us, a recording of the event is available for viewing below.

To keep informed on upcoming public engagements, please subscribe to the Metrolinx Toronto regional e-newsletter. For more information on previous public engagements, please click here.

The dedicated Community Engagement team can be reached at [email protected].

 

 

Call-In With Your Question

As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we are adding a call-in option for tonight’s event. To ask your question by voice, join the Zoom meeting here. We aim to keep each question and subsequent answer to 3 minutes allowing for as many call-in questions as possible.

NOTE: please ensure you have the latest version of Zoom installed.

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Agenda

6:30PM - 6:35PM: Welcome Remarks and Introductions

6:35PM - 7:00PM: Project Update

7:00PM - 8:00PM: Question and Answer Session

Meet the Speakers

Photo of Mathieu Goetzke

Mathieu Goetzke

Vice President, Planning - Metrolinx
Panelist & Presenter

Leona Hollingsworth

Leona Hollingsworth

Director, Community Engagement – Metrolinx
Panelist

Photo of David Hopper

David Hopper

Consultant Lead, Parsons/IBI Group
Panelist

Photo of Kristin Demasi

Kristin Demasi

Project Manager, DSBRT - Metrolinx
Presenter

Photo of David Phalp

David Phalp

Senior Manager, Community Engagement
Moderator

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar

While the current design aims to introduce cycling lanes that help connect 6 existing lanes (of the City’s cycling network) that connect to Ellesmere Rd. like the Meadoway, it also leaves a gap between Ellesmere/Kingston Rd. and Altona/Kingston Rd. even though existing cycling infrastructure is available to connect the area (at Sheppard & Kingston Rd.).

Addressing this gap would fully connect 4 on-street cycling infra (Conlins-Sheppard-Kingston-Ellesmere lanes), provide a safer way to travel between Pickering and Toronto, and would further assist Metrolinx and City of Toronto shared goal in promoting ‘First Mile-Last Mile’ trips via active and public transportation methods.

Will the DSBRT team plan to address this gap, such as using a multi-use trail located on one side of Kingston Rd (similar to the design between Orton Park Rd and Morningside Ave)?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:20

The Rouge River bridge is a known gap in the current cycling network and implementing dedicated cycling facilities is part of the City of Toronto's Master Cylcing Plan. The DSBRT project is proposing to operate in mixed traffic in this segment and will not be making any modifications to the Rouge River Bridge.

The project team has been working with the City of Tornoto to look at how cycling facilities can be provided. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 19, 2021 - 20:57

I support continuation of the cycling infrastructure between Altona and Elesmere on Kingston Rd
This is a busy road which is dangerous for cyclists but there is no reasonable alternative.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:22

The DSBRT team have been coordinating with the City of Toronto to advance the cycling infrastructure across the Rouge Valley. The BRT will operate in mixed traffic across the bridge. As no changes are proposed here, it will be at the discretion of the local municipality to provide the additional cycling infrastructure.

This specific segment is included in the City of Toronto's Cycling Plan.

VPuhakka's avatar
Sep 13, 2021 - 19:45

How does the team plan on recording the opinions of people who currently ride transit? All too often, these meetings are dominated by those opposed to the project. (who are less likely to use transit and are often motivated by baseless assumptions that surface busways will cause "traffic", might I add)

I can tell you from personal experience that the Durham-Scarborough BRT project is pretty popular among transit riders who are aware of the project, so what is your plan for reaching out to them and recording their opinions/desires surrounding this important plan?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:26

We know that good transit planning involves feedback from the community - including current and future transit users.

The DSBRT project team has been actively engaging with various transit and active transportation groups in the City of Toronto and Durham Region. In 2021, the community engagement teams hosted eight (8) virtual open houses; three of which, were part of Public Information Centre #4 held online from October 14 - November 11, 2021.  

The community engagement team has resumed smaller in-person events such as: community walkabouts and pop-ups and look forward to continuing engagement with communities, including transit advocacy groups along the proposed DSBRT corridor.

Our dedicated team can be reached at [email protected] or by completing a feedback form online. To keep informed on upcoming public engagement opportunities, please subscribe to our Durham and Toronto East regional e-newsletter(s) at metrolinx.com/subscribe

Nithursan's avatar

Ellesmere Road provides the most (fuel and cost) efficient path to connect commuters with the future subway location at STC, Centenary Hospital, the potential Eglinton East LRT, and 2 post-secondary campuses. While I support the DSBRT project and its proposed route, a uniform centre median design may cause some local inconvenience since my neighbourhood of Highland Creek differs quite a bit from the other communities being serviced (Morningside, Woburn).

The other two areas have only 2 residential properties with direct driveway frontage on Ellesmere, while the Highland Creek portion is almost purely residential with many driveways on both sides. It is also the only community out of the three to have an express bus route run inside the neighbourhood (TTC 905). For the portion of Ellesmere Road between Military Trail and Kingston Road - is there any reason why a curbside design isn't being considered as an option (as it was in the 2018 Initial Business Case)?

The curbside lane design could provide less impact on driveway access, while still allowing transit priority that both DRT and TTC buses (i.e. 905, 995) can use to service bus stops. The 2 intersections (Ellesmere/Military Trail and Ellesmere/Kingston Rd) are also where buses will temporarily join into mixed traffic (per dsbrtmap.ca), and can still join the center curbed lanes along the rest of the route.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:29

There are other segments along the corridor that have residential properties on both sides of the street, including Pickering Village in Ajax and parts of Whitby. There are other areas along other existing and proposed BRT and LRT corridors where the same solution is being proposed.

While the center median design will change how residents' access local driveways, the proposal will see a new traffic signal at Muirbank Blvd. Two other proposed signal locations that were suggested during consultation will be considered during the next design stage to further reduce any inconvenience to the local community through this segment of the corridor. 

The center median dedicated BRT lanes will provide a higher degree of transit priority and service reliability which will decrease travel times for transit riders using the BRT service.  

Anonymous's avatar

The total number of lanes including BRT lanes before and after Meadowvale and Conlins Road will be maintained at 4. What then is the purpose of increasing the number of lanes between Meadowvale and Conlins Road- this stretch of the Highland creek neighbourhood does not see more traffic, is primarily residential with single family homes and mature trees. Please explain why 4 lanes can not be maintained between Meadowvale and Conlins Road.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:30

The plan includes four lanes from Military Trail to Meadowvale Road. This was done in response to community concerns and in consultation with the City of Toronto.

Anonymous's avatar

Why exactly is Metrolinx proposing to run the DSBRT along Ellesmere through Highland Creek? The proposed route runs through a sensitive, residential area and there is absolutely no community support or upside for local residents for this concept.

Alternative routes - including along Sheppard (allowing for a connection at the Toronto Zoo and Rouge National Park and further afield to the Agincourt Go Station and ultimately the Sheppard subway line) or along the 401 - are much more workable, tenable and advantageous while having the least impact on the environment and existing communities. Like the Small’s Creek project, this seems to be another example of Metrolinx bullying its way towards a conclusion that absolutely does not make sense.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:32

With rapid growth in the past decade - and an expectation that travel demand will continue to increase - better transit will be needed to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred transit option to link Durham Region and Scarborough through the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and the Durham Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) Initial Business Case (IBC).

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA, including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue. Ellesmere Road was selected as the preferred route for several reasons:

·        It provides the most direct connection between Downtown Oshawa and Scarborough Centre. Ridership is highest between Pickering and Scarborough. The corridor also directly connects the Region’s Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) in both municipalities as well as University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) and the future subway.

·         It maximizes use of the existing network - TTC can increase feeder routes to service the busway which significantly increases transit access to Scarborough residents. Residents in Scarborough will have substantially more transit service available to them as both TTC and DRT will serve the corridor.

·         Travel time increases substantially using Sheppard Avenue as it isn’t a direct connection to the major trip generators between Durham and Toronto. It also does not service UTSC or the future subway as effectively. 

·         The DSBRT and the proposed Eglinton East LRT (EELRT) along Ellesmere Road have been planned in conjunction with the UTSC master plan which would see realignment of Military Trail further east. There is no way to effectively serve UTSC via Sheppard Avenue without creating additional congestion and conflicts with the EELRT, and general traffic along Ellesmere Road

·         It connects to future service planning initiatives including the EELRT which are important components of the Frequent Rapid Transit Network (FRTN). 

·         Sheppard Avenue is already planned for an LRT.

Anonymous's avatar

Ellesmere Road is a high residential area. DRT stops are far apart. Residents on either side of Ellesmere Road, and all areas around it, will be disrupted for very few pickup and drop off stops. The noise and vibration on Ellesmere Road is already unbearable. Increasing the width of the street and adding more traffic will destroy the pristine Rouge Conservation Area.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:33

With rapid growth in the past decade - and an expectation that travel demand will continue to increase - better transit will be needed to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred transit option to link Durham Region and Scarborough through the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and the Durham Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) Initial Business Case (IBC).

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA, including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue. Ellesmere Road was selected as the preferred route for several reasons:

·        It provides the most direct connection between Downtown Oshawa and Scarborough Centre. Ridership is highest between Pickering and Scarborough. The corridor also directly connects the Region’s Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) in both municipalities as well as University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) and the future subway.

·         It maximizes use of the existing network - TTC can increase feeder routes to service the busway which significantly increases transit access to Scarborough residents. Residents in Scarborough will have substantially more transit service available to them as both TTC and DRT will serve the corridor.

·         Travel time increases substantially using Sheppard Avenue as it isn’t a direct connection to the major trip generators between Durham and Toronto. It also does not service UTSC or the future subway as effectively. 

·         The DSBRT and the proposed Eglinton East LRT (EELRT) along Ellesmere Road have been planned in conjunction with the UTSC master plan which would see realignment of Military Trail further east. There is no way to effectively serve UTSC via Sheppard Avenue without creating additional congestion and conflicts with the EELRT, and general traffic along Ellesmere Road

·         It connects to future service planning initiatives including the EELRT which are important components of the Frequent Rapid Transit Network (FRTN). 

·         Sheppard Avenue is already planned for an LRT.

Anonymous's avatar

Currently, the traffic on Ellesmere Road in the Highland Creek area is and has been for decades light and flowing. The current Durham buses that are accessing the university fly down the road. Not to mention that the buses are never full. During rush hour, the number of riders changing from TTC to Durham transit does not demand priority lanes. The area is residential with detached housing. Most land has been developed and with Ellesmere's proximity to the 401 and Kingston Road it will remain likely that this road will not become congested in the future.
As a transit user, I don't see the need for this infrastructure through Highland Creek. This infrastructure is actually going to cause congesting with u turn signals required as left turns will be restricted. As a transit user I don't see the benefit of the this plan for Highland Creek Community users. The 2 minutes saved a quickly commute (to Scar Centre) is not worth the destruction and construction or the community.

The buses coming in from Durham currently only stop at Meadowvale and Ellesmere and then at the university. How would the TTC buses fit into this infrastructure. Being the border of Toronto/Scarborough, buses are feeding into Ellesmere (going westbound). The 905 and 95 buses are local buses stopping at every stop in the Highland Creek Community. At Military trail, the 905 leaves Ellesmere and the 38 and 995 bus join Ellesmere. The TTC buses would slow down the Durham Express buses in the rapid transit lane. Or is that the TTC buses would be running outside of the rapid transit lanes? Or will the Durham bus make local stops?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:38

As part of the project, the Pulse 900 route would be extended west to Scarborough Center and be permitted to operate at all stops in Toronto as well as Durham Region. 

The BRT lanes will be used by the DRT Pulse buses and TTC express services. A limited number of TTC buses will use the mixed traffic lane to serve local stops in the eastern part of Scarborough. Highland Creek residents will benefit from additional service at the DSBRT stops, and maintain local service at all of the current stops.

The time savings for the thousands of daily bus passengers is a significant benefit and the improvement in service reliability with the addition of dedicated lanes will encourage more people to choose transit for more of their trips.

Anonymous's avatar

We own a home on Ellesmere, just west of Muirbank. On the boulevard, there is an elm tree, one of the few that was not killed by the Dutch elm disease some years ago. If your proposed widening of Ellesmere east of Meadowvale is done, this would necessitate to removal of this tree. How can this tree be preserved? Also, as has been previously mentioned, why is a dedicated bus lane even required as the traffic along Ellesmere to UTSC is light at all times of the day?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:41

There are trees that have been identified for removal in order to permit the installation of new infrastructure: sidewalks and cycle tracks. Of the trees identified for removal, 5% are in poor condition as identified in the draft Arborist report. Impacted trees will be replaced at a ratio of 3:1. 

Metrolinx will work with both the City of Toronto and Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) where needed to determine suitable replanting location(s) for these potential replacement trees. 

Metrolinx is continuing to examine options to minimize impacts to vegetation along the corridor including minimizing and/or shifting the footprint of proposed cycling infrastructure, and/or reduction of boulevard widths.

Consultation with private property owners will be completed before any tree removals and or tree impacts/injuries occur on private property

AL's avatar

There is no bus transit barrier down the middle of Highway 2 Kingston Road in Pickering or Ajax. The DSBRT there is in the curb lanes. Why is it considered necessary, in Scarborough, to build a barrier down the middle of Ellesmere Road in Highland Creek where there is even less room, more side streets, more mature trees and more driveways to contend with? Why is this project treating the Ellesmere Road section so differently than the Pickering Village Kingston Road section?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:42

Transit priority measures will be implemented to maintain bus service reliability across the entire corridor. Where it is not feasible to implement dedicated lanes due to physical constraints “pinch-points” the design team will look at other priority options which could include:

  • Transit signal priority
  • Bus queue jump lanes
  • HOV/Business Access Transit Lanes
  • Limiting on street parking to off peak hours only

Specific locations for transit priority measures will be identified as part of design process.                                                                                                

For safety reasons, a raised centre island is added with Bus Rapid Transit.

The raised median is also critical to managing left turning traffic and discouraging drivers from crossing over the BRT lanes. The lanes are most efficient when they are used exclusively for transit vehicles.  With the raised center median, the only area where cars will cross the BRT route is at signalized intersections where the conflicts between cars and buses can be managed.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 11:14

Currently Elsemere Rd is being serviced by TTC all the way to the end at Kingston Rd. Therefore there is no need to disturb Ellesmere road to accommodate Metro Link bus. Sheppard Ave is wide enough to accommodate the buses and already has a turning lane from Kingston Rd.
Metro Link can have the bus come from Pickering along Kingston road, make a right on Shepherd Avenue, drive along Shepherd, exit Morningside, turn on Military trail and head straight to UFT. This way you will pick up more passengers along Shepherd Avenue and Morningside since TTC already has a # of busses on Ellesmere Rd. Do not change or disturb what is working well,
Look at ways to be efficient, cost effective and practical. Thank you Lil

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:42

With rapid growth in the past decade - and an expectation that travel demand will continue to increase - better transit will be needed to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred transit option to link Durham Region and Scarborough through the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and the Durham Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) Initial Business Case (IBC).

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA, including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue. Ellesmere Road was selected as the preferred route for several reasons:

·        It provides the most direct connection between Downtown Oshawa and Scarborough Centre. Ridership is highest between Pickering and Scarborough. The corridor also directly connects the Region’s Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) in both municipalities as well as University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) and the future subway.

·         It maximizes use of the existing network - TTC can increase feeder routes to service the busway which significantly increases transit access to Scarborough residents. Residents in Scarborough will have substantially more transit service available to them as both TTC and DRT will serve the corridor.

·         Travel time increases substantially using Sheppard Avenue as it isn’t a direct connection to the major trip generators between Durham and Toronto. It also does not service UTSC or the future subway as effectively. 

·         The DSBRT and the proposed Eglinton East LRT (EELRT) along Ellesmere Road have been planned in conjunction with the UTSC master plan which would see realignment of Military Trail further east. There is no way to effectively serve UTSC via Sheppard Avenue without creating additional congestion and conflicts with the EELRT, and general traffic along Ellesmere Road

·         It connects to future service planning initiatives including the EELRT which are important components of the Frequent Rapid Transit Network (FRTN). 

·         Sheppard Avenue is already planned for an LRT.

Anonymous's avatar

While I am in support of the potential interconnectivity that Metrolinx proposes be done within our great city, some of the urban planning that's being proposed here is in absolute shambles. The preliminary designs advertised seem to benefit no one that actually lives within the neighborhood that this is affecting. Namely, my main concerns being with areas 3 & 4 of the preliminary design, although mainly 3 as it directly affects the area I reside in.

Why would it even be a thought to make dedicated bus lanes for such a small stretch of road? In order to improve efficiency for a potential reality of ridership? Which may or may not be accurate, due to projected forecasts of population travel? Based on what data exactly? We all know how long these projects can and most likely will go on/be delayed for, why uproot the livelihood of the residents within that stretch by subjecting them to enormous amounts of construction which by its end, won't even benefit the people living there at all?

Removing our ability to make left turns towards Meadowvale disrupts our flow of traffic completely, forcing vehicle users to congest the Military Trail/Ellesmere intersection, which is already contentious enough with what there being a university campus there. I cannot speak for everyone, but a major reason of my living in this area particularly was that I have the options to head to the 401 via Meadowvale if I'm heading eastwards and subsequently Morningside if i'm heading westwards. The beauty about living here is that there are options. Your proposed plans however, throws all of that right out of the window.

Why even incur those construction costs upon yourself/City of Toronto when a much more cost-effective and yet very viable solution is available in the hybrid/mixed use lanes throughout?. Not only would you save yourselves money, but mixed/hybrid use lanes will cause minimal disruption to the entire neighborhood as well. There is currently a TTC stop right at the entrance of Highland Creek Park, expanding that to make it a proper curbside stop would not only help with traffic efficiency, but will give the residents a central location to congregate to if they would like to even use this service themselves.

I hope these designs will be reconsidered and that you are actually taking these posts as a form of constructive criticism because if things continue to progress as preliminarily advertised, I foresee this to not be a benefit to anyone but yourselves by forcibly adding congestion where it is not needed. Add more buses if you want to improve service time, but dedicated lanes is most definitely not the answer here.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:45

With rapid growth in the past decade - and an expectation that travel demand will continue to increase - better transit will be needed to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred transit option to link Durham Region and Scarborough through the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and the Durham Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) Initial Business Case (IBC).

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA, including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue. Ellesmere Road was selected as the preferred route for several reasons:

·        It provides the most direct connection between Downtown Oshawa and Scarborough Centre. Ridership is highest between Pickering and Scarborough. The corridor also directly connects the Region’s Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) in both municipalities as well as University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) and the future subway.

·         It maximizes use of the existing network - TTC can increase feeder routes to service the busway which significantly increases transit access to Scarborough residents. Residents in Scarborough will have substantially more transit service available to them as both TTC and DRT will serve the corridor.

·         Travel time increases substantially using Sheppard Avenue as it isn’t a direct connection to the major trip generators between Durham and Toronto. It also does not service UTSC or the future subway as effectively. 

·         The DSBRT and the proposed Eglinton East LRT (EELRT) along Ellesmere Road have been planned in conjunction with the UTSC master plan which would see realignment of Military Trail further east. There is no way to effectively serve UTSC via Sheppard Avenue without creating additional congestion and conflicts with the EELRT, and general traffic along Ellesmere Road

·         It connects to future service planning initiatives including the EELRT which are important components of the Frequent Rapid Transit Network (FRTN). 

·         Sheppard Avenue is already planned for an LRT.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 18, 2021 - 17:36

I can see that the plan is for Durham buses to go to Scarborough Centre (I assume that is so that they can connect with the subway line whenever it's built). Instead of destroying Ellesmere road unnecessarily, why not use existing infrastructure? The buses can come down to the university as they currently do and then go to Kennedy Station using the red lanes that are running along Morningside Ave, Kingston Road and Eglinton Ave. On Kingston Rd and Eglinton Ave, the roads were already wide with 3 lanes and now they are 2 lanes for cars and 1 lane for buses. Durham residents can access the subway from Kennedy station instead. There would be no need for any construction! It's up and ready to go!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:24

The DSBRT project will build on the existing DRT PULSE 900 service and would see dedicated lanes along Highway 2 and Ellesmere Road - where feasible - to provide fast and frequent service between Durham Region and Scarborough. 

The existing PULSE service will continue to operate on the corridor, and TTC and GO Bus services will also use the dedicated bus lanes.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 18, 2021 - 17:46

In Scarborough will we be able to access the Durham buses for the same fare as TTC to travel within Scarborough? Right now when travelling eastbound, if I get off of a TTC vehicle at Military Trail and Ellesmere (ie 38A/B, 95B, 995,) and transfer onto a Durham vehicle to get to Meadowvale and Ellesmere, I would have to pay an extra fare to use the Durham bus within Scarborough. How would use of fares work? How would the presto card know where you exit the vehicle? Will Durham transit charge TTC fares within Toronto for travel within Toronto?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 11:46

The project proposes that TTC, DRT and GO Transit buses will use the corridor, similarly to how they do today.

DRT will stop and pick up passengers in Scarborough doubling the available service to residents. As part of the project customers will be able to travel on either a TTC or DRT bus along the corridor and pay one fare.

AL's avatar

Could Metrolinx respond today now and also publicly in the next Scarborough Mirror to all the issues pointed out in a full page public notice in the September issues of the Scarborough Mirror so that the residents know that you are actually paying attention to their concerns? This includes these statements in the notice;
DSBRT will destroy community without any benefit to residents
DSBRT centre median will block all left turns except signalized intersections
DSBRT will mean unsafe u-turns and rerouting through neighbourhoods
DSBRT will cause minimal time saving for riders.
DSRBT means Ellesmere widening for 3 - 4 years of construction.
DSRBT means trucks diverted to Bellamy, Progress, Markham & Ellesmere.
No traffic studies of impacts to Bellamy, Progress, Markham & Ellesmere.
DSBRT means left turning traffic will be delayed.
Metrolinx says needs of local residents & businesses were not considered.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:14

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue.

The Durham-Scarborough BRT is more than just a bus route. Improved bus stop amenities, such as offboard fare collection and next bus arrival signage, will help ensure a smooth, pleasant travel experience. Frequent service along dedicated lanes will improve the reliability of the bus, not only saving you time, but also attracting more transit riders. Additionally, as ridership and demand increase, BRT service can easily adapt to customer needs, which will ensure the quality of the service is maintained.

Improvements will include:

  • Next Bus arrival signage
  • Benches and accessible waiting areas
  • Off-board fare collection
  • Map and local area information to orient riders
  • Weather protection
  • Garbage cans
  • Station identification signage, to assist riders to know where they are as they travel

The project team reads every comment and uses the feedback to refine the preliminary design. All comments received will be documented in the public record for this project in the Environmental Project Report.

A significant number of suggestions and feedback from the consultations have been incorporated and have shaped the design. This includes changes in the Highland Creek area, in Pickering Village, downtown Oshawa and downtown Whitby. 

Some of the comments received will be carried forward to detail design, such as measures to protect trees or transplant them where possible. These are too detailed for the environmental assessment stage but are valuable to the future design.      

 Metrolinx has an established community benefits and supports program to ensure that residents, businesses, and communities can realize the benefits that these major transit projects will bring to their communities.

On the DSBRT, Metrolinx in partnership with the various project delivery partners, will implement a suite of flexible and responsive community and business support initiatives. In addition to construction mitigation, these will include opportunities for employment and for procurement.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 16, 2021 - 16:24

Benefits of highway 2A vs ellesmere road
- minimize disruption to the highland creek community. The BRT will disrupt access to the highland creek community park and library and will result in the loss of beautiful mature trees.
- highway 2A passes through highland creek village with shops and restaurants. Having a BRT provide access to this area would help rejuvenate the local businesses and would provide transportation benefits not only to residents of the Durham region but local residents as well.

Im not sure that the additional 1-2 minute saved in commuter time justifies the cost to the local community. The sole purpose of metrolinx should not be to service university students and residents of Durham region.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:26

The Initial Business Case (2018) looked at operating the BRT on Highway 2A and Military Trail and found that it did not generate the ridership potential that the more direct Ellesmere Road route does.

There are trees that have been identified for removal in order to permit the installation of new infrastructure: sidewalks and cycle tracks. Of the trees identified for removal, 5% are in poor condition as identified in the draft Arborist report. Impacted trees will be replaced at a ratio of 3:1. 

Metrolinx will work with both the City of Toronto and Toronto and Region Conservation Authority (TRCA) where needed to determine suitable replanting location(s) for these potential replacement trees. 

Metrolinx is continuing to examine options to minimize impacts to vegetation along the corridor including minimizing and/or shifting the footprint of proposed cycling infrastructure, and/or reduction of boulevard widths.

Consultation with private property owners will be completed before any tree removals and or tree impacts/injuries occur on private property. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 20, 2021 - 18:46

Did Metrolinx even consult the community before deciding to build a Rapid Bus Transit? Many community members have complained about the number of problems that this construction will cause. One of these problems is the inability to make left hand turns to and from driveways and businesses on Ellesmere.

The construction will also significantly impact businesses on Ellesmere which have struggled in the last year and a half due to closures and lockdowns as a result of COVID-19.

Is Metrolinx just going to bully residents of the community into accepting this construction? Or are they going to allow for the community to have a say as to whether they even want this Rapid Bus Transit to be built?

The community would like to know.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:28

The project team reads every comment and uses the feedback to refine the preliminary design. All comments received will be documented in the public record for this project in the Environmental Project Report (EPR).

A significant number of suggestions and feedback from the consultations have been incorporated and have shaped the design. This includes changes in the Highland Creek area, in Pickering Village, downtown Oshawa and downtown Whitby. 

Some of the comments received will be carried forward into the detail design stage, such as measures to protect trees or transplant them where possible. These are too detailed for the environmental assessment stage but are valuable to the future design.                                                                

Metrolinx has an established community benefits and supports program to ensure that residents, businesses, and communities can realize the benefits that these major transit projects will bring to their communities.

On the DSBRT, Metrolinx in partnership with the various project delivery partners, will implement a suite of flexible and responsive community and business support initiatives. In addition to construction mitigation, these will include opportunities for employment and for procurement.

AL's avatar
Sep 21, 2021 - 10:49

The 905 Express Bus works fine with curbside painted bus lanes and minimal construction and costs. Why should the DSBRT route on Ellesmere Road be any different? Ellesmere should stay 4 lanes through the residential sections of Highland Creek. If it’s necessary to have a 6 lane Express bus route then Sheppard Ave is the obvious place to build it. Sheppard Ave was designed with the necessary room for expansion without destroying neighbourhoods. It can connect with the subway at McCowan Road and Sheppard Ave and even continue to the Don Mills Subway station.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:29

With rapid growth in the past decade - and an expectation that travel demand will continue to increase - better transit will be needed to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred transit option to link Durham Region and Scarborough through the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and the Durham Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) Initial Business Case (IBC).

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA, including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue. Ellesmere Road was selected as the preferred route for several reasons:

·        It provides the most direct connection between Downtown Oshawa and Scarborough Centre. Ridership is highest between Pickering and Scarborough. The corridor also directly connects the Region’s Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) in both municipalities as well as University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) and the future subway.

·         It maximizes use of the existing network - TTC can increase feeder routes to service the busway which significantly increases transit access to Scarborough residents. Residents in Scarborough will have substantially more transit service available to them as both TTC and DRT will serve the corridor.

·         Travel time increases substantially using Sheppard Avenue as it isn’t a direct connection to the major trip generators between Durham and Toronto. It also does not service UTSC or the future subway as effectively. 

·         The DSBRT and the proposed Eglinton East LRT (EELRT) along Ellesmere Road have been planned in conjunction with the UTSC master plan which would see realignment of Military Trail further east. There is no way to effectively serve UTSC via Sheppard Avenue without creating additional congestion and conflicts with the EELRT, and general traffic along Ellesmere Road

·         It connects to future service planning initiatives including the EELRT which are important components of the Frequent Rapid Transit Network (FRTN). 

·         Sheppard Avenue is already planned for an LRT.

Anonymous's avatar

When do you expect to begin construction in the Highland creek area?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:30

The project will be delivered in a phased approach. Exact timing will be refined over the next year when the TPAP concludes and we move into the detailed design stage.

In each segment, construction will be completed over one to three construction seasons. Work will begin in areas where there are fewer space and congestion constrains. The exact sequence of construction has not yet been determined. It will also be determined by funding availability, property acquisition, design development, other road works in the corridor and on adjacent streets and potentially utility upgrades such as sewer upgrades or hydro works.

AL's avatar

In Ajax, along the DSBRT route, there is a segment of Kingston Road that passes through the old established Pickering Village area where houses are closest to the street and where many old mature trees exist. In that Pickering Village area section of Kingston Road there are only 4 lanes of mixed traffic even though there are 6 lanes of traffic on Kingston Road both east and west of that section. It is recognized that the Pickering Village section should not be bisected by a 6+ lane road. Like Pickering Village, Highland Creek should be respected as a quiet stable residential community and NOT be bisected by and unneeded expansion of Ellesmere Road to 6+ lanes.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:31

The segment through Pickering Village has been modified throughout this project.  The current proposed design is a 5-lane roadway, with one westbound lane, two BRT lanes, and two eastbound lanes.  

The second eastbound lane was added to address the significant afternoon traffic volumes in the easterly direction. This residential area will see the addition of a central-median similar to the one proposed along Ellesmere Road.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 23:28

If the plan is to widen Ellesmere, then it will take pedestrians longer to cross the road. Has there been any analysis on the impact of this on traffic? At certain intersections it can take several light cycles to clear an intersection when making a left turn. It is especially long to get through Dormington and Gander at times because there is no turning lane on to Ellesmere. I'm concerned that pedestrians crossing Ellesmere will require more time and make it more difficult for traffic intersecting with Ellesmere to flow. How will this be addressed?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:31

The traffic analysis considered the increased pedestrian crossing times in the areas where the road will be widened. This has been accounted for in modifying the signal timings and considering the need for additional ancillary turn lanes.

At BRT stops, there will also be a protected pedestrian refuge at the end of the ramp to the BRT platform. This will provide a safe place for pedestrians to wait if they need to cross the intersections in two stages.

AL's avatar

For the area south of 401 and north of Ellesmere Road between Meadowvale Ave and Moorish Road, does Metrolinx understand that, with left turns from side streets blocked by a centre median on Ellesmere Road, almost all drivers from this area wishing to go east on Ellesmere Road will be funnelled onto Euclid which has schools at both ends? To increase traffic around school zones seems nonsensical and dangerous.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:32

We recognize that there will be some redistribution of local neighbourhood trips with the introduction of the BRT infrastructure.

One of the goals of the DSBRT is to reduce demand for car travel by providing a higher quality, more reliable transit service to the community. Metrolinx is committed to working with the municipalities and Region throughout detail design to identify any future traffic calming requirements for the project. Metrolinx will be monitoring traffic conditions post implementation as will be documented in the Environmental Project Report (EPR). 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 21, 2021 - 19:35

If this ridiculous plan is allowed to proceed, how will affected homeowners be compensated for the unnecessary destruction of their property? It is completely inappropriate to have a plan like this implemented in a residential area.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:33

Specific property requirements will be confirmed and communicated to property owners as the project proceeds to detailed design.

Anonymous's avatar

Collins Rd to Morris Rd.
In the event of an emergency in the above area, where the Ambulance, Fire and Police departments are needed and time is of the utmost importance, It will restrict them from making a left turn unto Calverley Trail, which is the main artery that runs through the entire subdivision. Please take matter into consideration when making the prohibition to Ingress and egress into the area.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:37

The project team has consulted with Police, Fire and Paramedic Services in each Municipality. As with any construction project, Metrolinx will continue to work with emergency services through the detail design process, before construction begins, and during the construction period.

Anonymous's avatar

I don't see any traffic issues currently. Did you have someone actually monitor the s traffic ie how many buses went by, how many ppl were on it, how many got off in the area between Military trail and Meadowdale Ave.
Have you monitored how many cars do a left turn on these roads that will not be able to.
Have you looked at having an HOV lane during rush hours instead of dedicated bus lanes and center medians to block the left turn lanes.
Why was the corridor on Ellesmere which is all residential considered instead of other non residential streets ie Morningside, Markham, he 401, etc.
How did u cost justify the benefits.
We have about half dozens schools in residential area within half a kilometer,North n south of Ellesmere. If you stop people from making left turns, they will use residential roads. How do you plan to protect school zones and safety on the residential roads?
How are Ambulances and Firetruck get to emergence situations?
Your current plan will create noise and pollution. Residents will spend extra 10 mins more to and from work. It is a lose, lose proposal for all of us.
Covid has changed how people work. Does your proposal take this into account? Your detailed plan is pre covid. What changes have you made for covid? Was another study done to revisit the original plan.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:35

As part of the study traffic and transit ridership numbers were assembled and reviewed. The modeling work projected future travel demand in the study area in 2041. The future work accounts for increased population and employment and indicates significant increases in both road traffic and transit usage.

Today both the TTC and PULSE services end their routes in the area. When the PULSE route is extended to Scarborough Center and additional TTC services extend further east there will be an increase in ridership.

Alternate routes were considered through earlier studies, all of which indicated that the route currently being planned is the most direct and efficient to move people along the corridor.

The benefits and costs were analysed in the Initial Business Case study completed in 2018. This will be updated as pat of the current study to reflect the changes in design, costs, and projected ridership. The updated business case will be available in early 2022.

Emergency services and local traffic pattern changes have been reviewed.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 10:04

As we are still dealing and trying recover from Covid, why is Metrolinx trying to push this plan through?
The citizens of Scarborough and businesses along Ellesmere will have to live with this decision for many years to come.
Many people will not be properly informed if all we are having is online virtual meetings controlled by Metrolinx.
The use of old traffic studies are being used because they don't want to wait till after all our regular activity returns to normal .
There are better alternatives and solutions that Metrolinx refuses to consider as their agenda is set.
We should wait till all is somewhat normal again and proper community meetings can be held, and the true facts can be debated in a public forum.
Thumbs up for putting a hold on the BRT till our communities are heard from and taken into consideration.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:38

Planning for this project was initiated pre-pandemic. The 2018 Initial Business Case focused on defining the costs and benefits for this corridor, as part of the larger Regional Transit Plan. 

The project will be delivered in a phased approach. Exact timing will be refined over the next year when the TPAP concludes and we move into the detailed design stage.

In each segment, construction will be completed over one to three construction seasons. Work will begin in areas where there are fewer space and congestion constrains. The exact sequence of construction has not yet been determined. It will also be determined by funding availability, property acquisition, design development, other road works in the corridor and on adjacent streets and potentially utility upgrades such as sewer upgrades or hydro works.

Anonymous's avatar

I'm concerned about the impact on traffic especially during construction along Ellesmere. How long will construction last? And how will traffic disruptions be minimized? What sort of traffic delays are expected?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:39

The project will be delivered in a phased approach. Exact timing will be refined over the next year when the TPAP concludes and we move into the detailed design stage.

In each segment, construction will be completed over one to three construction seasons. Work will begin in areas where there are fewer space and congestion constrains. The exact sequence of construction has not yet been determined. It will also be determined by funding availability, property acquisition, design development, other road works in the corridor and on adjacent streets and potentially utility upgrades such as sewer upgrades or hydro works.
 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 17, 2021 - 20:28

What are you doing to improve your track record when it comes to compliance with the Legislation. Please provide a complete plan that outlines how you plan to make this completely accessible for people with disabilities?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:40

The proposed design is fully compliant with AODA. The design team has been designing in accessible features including limiting ramp grades, providing adequate space for turning circles and for people to pass by mobility devices. An option to raise the level of the BRT platforms to match the floor height to that of the buses and provide level boarding has also been reviewed. The proposed design has also been presented to the local accessibility advisory committees in each municipality along the corridor.

If there is specific additional information we can provide on the details, please reach out to us at [email protected].

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 20, 2021 - 16:06

I believe that these dedicated bus lanes will cause more trouble and more problems for residents living in the area where these lanes will go through.If they can do the dedicated bus lanes in areas where there is mostly commercial and larger streets intersecting [most of them with stop lights] that may work but in the areas where there many residential streets this will only cause problems for the people living in the area.So my question is can they do dedicated bus lanes in some areas only?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:45

Continuous dedicated centre-median transit lanes through most sections of the corridor play a significant role in ensuring the overall project benefits - increased service, reliability, and connectivity across the Toronto-Durham boundary. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 23, 2021 - 18:39

My concern is the lack of safety consideration on major traffic turning streets such as Conlins, Morrish and Calverly for example. Cars speeding through neighborhoods when they should have been on Ellesemers St.

Why not use Sheppard Ave where it is more commercial properties and is already wider road?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:51

With rapid growth in the past decade - and an expectation that travel demand will continue to increase - better transit will be needed to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred transit option to link Durham Region and Scarborough through the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and the Durham Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) Initial Business Case (IBC).

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA, including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue. Ellesmere Road was selected as the preferred route for several reasons:

·        It provides the most direct connection between Downtown Oshawa and Scarborough Centre. Ridership is highest between Pickering and Scarborough. The corridor also directly connects the Region’s Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) in both municipalities as well as University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) and the future subway.

·         It maximizes use of the existing network - TTC can increase feeder routes to service the busway which significantly increases transit access to Scarborough residents. Residents in Scarborough will have substantially more transit service available to them as both TTC and DRT will serve the corridor.

·         Travel time increases substantially using Sheppard Avenue as it isn’t a direct connection to the major trip generators between Durham and Toronto. It also does not service UTSC or the future subway as effectively. 

·         The DSBRT and the proposed Eglinton East LRT (EELRT) along Ellesmere Road have been planned in conjunction with the UTSC master plan which would see realignment of Military Trail further east. There is no way to effectively serve UTSC via Sheppard Avenue without creating additional congestion and conflicts with the EELRT, and general traffic along Ellesmere Road

·         It connects to future service planning initiatives including the EELRT which are important components of the Frequent Rapid Transit Network (FRTN). 

·         Sheppard Avenue is already planned for an LRT.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 23, 2021 - 20:36

We have chosen to live in a quiet community of Highland creek. Why would you disrupt a neighbourhoods, divert traffic into small streets just to save 2 minutes?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:52

With rapid growth in the past decade - and an expectation that travel demand will continue to increase - better transit will be needed to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred transit option to link Durham Region and Scarborough through the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and the Durham Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) Initial Business Case (IBC).

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA, including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue. Ellesmere Road was selected as the preferred route for several reasons:

·        It provides the most direct connection between Downtown Oshawa and Scarborough Centre. Ridership is highest between Pickering and Scarborough. The corridor also directly connects the Region’s Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) in both municipalities as well as University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) and the future subway.

·         It maximizes use of the existing network - TTC can increase feeder routes to service the busway which significantly increases transit access to Scarborough residents. Residents in Scarborough will have substantially more transit service available to them as both TTC and DRT will serve the corridor.

·         Travel time increases substantially using Sheppard Avenue as it isn’t a direct connection to the major trip generators between Durham and Toronto. It also does not service UTSC or the future subway as effectively. 

·         The DSBRT and the proposed Eglinton East LRT (EELRT) along Ellesmere Road have been planned in conjunction with the UTSC master plan which would see realignment of Military Trail further east. There is no way to effectively serve UTSC via Sheppard Avenue without creating additional congestion and conflicts with the EELRT, and general traffic along Ellesmere Road

·         It connects to future service planning initiatives including the EELRT which are important components of the Frequent Rapid Transit Network (FRTN). 

·         Sheppard Avenue is already planned for an LRT.

Anonymous's avatar

I have been involved for many years in planning and evaluating energy projects for utilities and government investment projects with long time horizons. In most cases the forecasts were wrong, the evaluations became outdated and in some cases projects were built although when they were completed they were not needed.

In order to avoid to have the same problem with this proposed project, I have the following questions:

a) The studies and the data used for this project are more than four years old. Do you plan to update your studies including the forecasts based on which your evaluations are based on? If yes, when do you expect these studies to be completed?

b) The benefit cost ratio of 1.29 for this project appears to be too low given the 40 year time horizon of this project.

c) Have you considered and monetized the environmental (pollution and greenhouse gas emissions) as well as non-environmental externalities (i.e. health effects, inconvenience etc. of local residence?). If not, do you plan to do so when you update your studies?

d) Do you believe that the Covid will have a significantly impact on the use of public transportation going forward ( i.e. work from home) ? Do you plan to update your studies and forecasts in order to take this into account?

e) The new Scarborough subway line currently under construction will be extended from Scarborough Town Center to Sheppard Ave in order to be linked with the Sheppard East subway extension. Will you consider revising the proposed project to take into account this recent development? If not, why not?

f) Will it be more appropriate to consider other options with less impacts to the Highland Creek Community before you proceed with the proposed project? For example have you consider:

- providing priority to the Durham buses during the peak hours if needed?
- creating HOV lanes if there is a need?
- construct dedicated bus stops to facilitate the flow of traffic traffic if needed?

These and other options are less expensive and disruptive to the Highland Creek Community

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:50

The forecasts for this project are based on the GTHA travel model. The model is based on a series of comprehensive travel surveys and has been well calibrated to the existing travel demands and shown to be a strong predictor of future travel demand.  

A benefit cost ratio greater than 1 is a positive figure which indicates that the overall benefits of the project exceed the costs. This corridor is one of three priority BRT corridors that Metrolinx is planning. 

The Initial Business Case (IBC), completed in 2018 outlines how the costs and benefits were considered. The next stage of this project will be an updated Preliminary Design Business Case (PDBC), which will revisit the costs and benefits given the more advanced design concept. The PDBC will be available in early 2022.

The project will connect to the new bus terminal being planned for Scarborough Center Station.

The early stages of the project looked at all these options and concluded that dedicated BRT lanes are necessary to create the level of predictability and reliability necessary to encourage high levels of transit usage.  

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 16:56

Very excited to hear about this project. Giving people more transportation options (including faster buses and safe bikeways) to help connect Scarborough and Durham will benefit residents and businesses all along this stretch. This project could help many people who feel their only good option is to drive, and is a great way to compliment existing GO train service. Are there any plans about fare integration for people using TTC?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:54

The DSBRT project proposes that TTC, DRT and GO Transit buses will use the corridor, similarly to how they do today.

DRT will stop and pick up passengers in Scarborough doubling the available service to residents. As part of the project, customers will be able to travel on either a TTC or DRT bus along the corridor and pay one fare.

Anonymous's avatar

Are the northbound and southbound right-turn prohibitions from Military Trail to Ellesmere a permanent feature, and if so why?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:55

This would be under the City of Toronto's purview. 

Anonymous's avatar

Pls provide the Residential address/area details of where this type of centre median transit implementations referenced during the discussion.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:56

There are several existing and planned transit facilities that operate with central medians through residential areas other than the areas along the current corridor in Highland Creek, Pickering Village, and limited areas in Whitby and Oshawa:

1) The Queensway - residential along north side from Ellis to Windermere.  No access across the streetcar tracks.

2) Spadina Avenue - residential along west side of Spadina opposite U of T.  No access across the streetcar tracks.

3) St. Clair Avenue - Avenue Road to Spadina Road.  No access across the streetcar tracks.

4) EELRT - Morningside south of West Hill Collegiate to Kingston Road - Planned LRT with no crossing of median tracks.

5) EELRT - various other areas have some residential along the median LRT tracks.

6) Hurontario - Pinewood Trail to south of Mineola - mixed residential on both sides of the road.

6) Chapman Mills (Ottawa) - median BRT with residential along both sides.

7) Baseline Road (Ottawa) - several segments with residential along both sides of the road. 

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 23, 2021 - 20:37

The host would not let people into the chat to ask legitimate questions. This is rigged!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:57

We apologize for any technical issues during the virtual open house and thank you for your feedback. As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we added a call-in option to provide an opportunity for as many people as possible to learn more about the project and ask questions directly to our panel. We are continuing to refine our virtual engagement format based on feedback like this and hope you were able to complete the post-event survey. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 23, 2021 - 18:01

What resources will you provide for children walking to the primary school on Meadowvale from the southwest quadrant. This journey requires young children to cross at the traffic light to reach east side of Meadowvale and another light to reach the Northside of Ellesmere .

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:58

At Metrolinx safety is our top priority. The project will improve safety for all road users:

  • Improving pedestrian experience through upgraded, continuous sidewalks
  • Protecting transit users through raised and barrier-protected platforms
  • Improving safety of cyclists with grade separated cycling facilities
  • Preventing collisions for drivers by incorporating a raised median to prevent unsignalized left turns. Each signalized intersection will have a dedicated left-turn lane and fully protected left-turn “green arrow”. This means left turn and U-turn movements can be made while all other traffic is stopped, improving safety for the travelling public.

Recent experience in York Region has demonstrated the substantial safety improvements along their bus rapid transit routes, including:

improved travel for ambulance and fire vehicles, with access to traffic-free rapidway lanes between 51% and 74% fewer collisions along rapidways, likely due to eliminating midblock left turns across traffic (see page 21 of http://www.vivanext.com/PDFs/Corp/YRRTC_Annual_Report_2019.pdf.)

Anonymous's avatar

I have been living in the west rouge area over 3 decades, we managed to convince the city with province to build the water front trail for us with millions of dollars of investment, Metroninx Unilaterally decided to close the Gate at the Rouge Hill Go station, totally blocked the access to water front trail, without any community consultation, we called our City councilor, she has opposed it, we called our MPP, he opposed it, and we called our MP he opposed it too. Three level of Governments opposed and disagree with Metronix; Totally disregards to health and safety of the community at the time of Pandemic which there are little place for people to go for exercise & get fresh air for their health & safety.
Recently, one of the Retirement Home Manager / CEO was arrested and charged by police due to the fact that he removed the Door Handles from the residences so people don't get out to not spread virus to their residence according to the CEO to make it safe, we would like the same charges pressed against the Metronix CEO & managers who decided to close the gate to the water front access without the community consultations.
A couple of weeks a go, I was passing by the Rouge Hill Go station, I saw an Ambulance at the closed Gate and the lights were flashing, someone either had an Heart Attack or medical problem at the Trail, its impossible to extract someone through the tunnel and Rail track platform in a timely manner.
We warn the Metronix, if anyone fall in the track from the platform or paramedics can not reach the trail because of gate blockage of Metronix, we hold Metronix CEO and managers accountable of Murder; for making our community unsafe without any consultation or advise from the community how to make it safe.
The community is very angry and disappointed of Metrolinx by closing the legitimate access to the water front trail with total disregards to the community's safety , health & well being at this time of Pandemic.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:58

Thank you for your feedback. For more information on this project please visit www.metrolinx.com/Lakeshoreeast or e-mail the community engagement team at [email protected] 

Anonymous's avatar

Is the DSBRT anticipated to be operating at the same period as the TTC's shuttle bus service that covers between closure of Line 3 and the completion of SSE? If yes, is there the possibility that GO buses that would normally terminate/turn-around at Scarborough Town Centre (including the DSBRT Ellesmere) would go all the way through to Kennedy Station instead?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:59

That is an operational decision that will be made closer to the closure of Line 3.  

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 12:59

The project will be delivered in a phased approach. Exact timing will be refined over the next year when the TPAP concludes and we move into the detailed design stage.

In each segment, construction will be completed over one to three construction seasons. Work will begin in areas where there are fewer space and congestion constrains. The exact sequence of construction has not yet been determined. It will also be determined by funding availability, property acquisition, design development, other road works in the corridor and on adjacent streets and potentially utility upgrades such as sewer upgrades or hydro works.  

Anonymous's avatar

The people and car safety data from York Region appears to be from commercial not residential areas. Why can this comparison to Highland Creek be made?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:00

Recent experience in York Region has demonstrated the substantial safety improvements along their bus rapid transit routes, including:

Improved travel for ambulance and fire vehicles, with access to traffic-free rapidway lanes between 51% and 74% fewer collisions along rapidways, likely due to eliminating midblock left turns across traffic (see page 21 of http://www.vivanext.com/PDFs/Corp/YRRTC_Annual_Report_2019.pdf.)

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 23, 2021 - 19:38

Large areas of Ellesmere already have separate bike lanes along side. They were just refreshed and rebuild this year. Why destroy them to waste more of the tax money? Oh - the intersections sidewalks are being rebuilt now. Like today and this week. Now you are planning to destroy those and waste even more money. Fix the light timing to allow easy traffic

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:01

During the detail design stage, the project team will examine opportunities to reduce impacts to new and existing infrastructure where feasible to do so. 

Anonymous's avatar

Morningside already has dedicated bus lanes. Not worth destroying Ellesmere or spending millions of dollars. If you need to widen Ellesmere, just make it normal width, like it is further west, bus NO DEDICATED BUS LANES.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:02

The bus lanes on Morningside Avenue are an early stage of the planned Eglinton East LRT project. They are planned for replacement by the LRT once the project moves forward. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 17, 2021 - 15:59

There are currently three condo buildings being proposed for the 2A and Military Trail vicinity. This route would also go through the Highland Creek Village to help the retail sector. It could then continue north to UTSC and any transfers and connections could happen at UTSC avoiding all the disruption to the residential area of Highland Creek. Ellesmere Road already has very reliable TTC service.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:05

With rapid growth in the past decade - and an expectation that travel demand will continue to increase - better transit will be needed to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred transit option to link Durham Region and Scarborough through the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and the Durham Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) Initial Business Case (IBC).

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA, including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue. Ellesmere Road was selected as the preferred route for several reasons:

·         It provides the most direct connection between Downtown Oshawa and Scarborough Centre. Ridership is highest between Pickering and Scarborough. The corridor also directly connects the Region’s Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) in both municipalities as well as University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) and the future subway.

·         It maximizes use of the existing network - TTC can increase feeder routes to service the busway which significantly increases transit access to Scarborough residents. Residents in Scarborough will have substantially more transit service available to them as both TTC and DRT will serve the corridor.

·         The DSBRT and the proposed Eglinton East LRT (EELRT) along Ellesmere Road have been planned in conjunction with the UTSC master plan which would see realignment of Military Trail further east. 

·         It connects to future service planning initiatives including the EELRT which are important components of the Frequent Rapid Transit Network (FRTN). 

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:06

For safety reasons, a raised centre island is added with Bus Rapid Transit.

The raised median is also critical to managing left turning traffic and discouraging drivers from crossing over the BRT lanes. The lanes are most efficient when they are used exclusively for transit vehicles. With the raised center median, the only area where cars will cross the BRT route is at signalized intersections. 

Anonymous's avatar

Will cars be allowed to drive on the bus express lanes after rush hour?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:08

For safety reasons, a raised centre island is added with Bus Rapid Transit.

The raised median is also critical to managing left turning traffic and discouraging drivers from crossing over the BRT lanes. The lanes are most efficient when they are used exclusively for transit vehicles. With the raised center median, the only area where cars will cross the BRT route is at signalized intersections.

The dedicated BRT lanes will be exclusively for transit vehicles at all hours of the day. Cars will not be permitted in the lanes at any time.

AL's avatar

Right now, even in rush hour, there is not much traffic along segment 3 of Ellesmere Road. I know it rarely takes more than a 10 second wait to make a left turn onto Ellesmere Road from a side street. Segment 4 of Ellesmere Road is presently only 2 lanes but it is never busy and easily handles the traffic. You could double or triple the traffic along Ellesmere Road in Highland Creek without the need to widen it. To widen it to 6 lanes is overkill in the extreme and an unnecessary waste of resources. Widening Ellesmere Road to 6 lanes would slash the community in half and diminish the quality of life in the area. It’s a destructive and expensive solution to a problem that doesn’t exist
Does Metrolinx understand that pushing the project to expand Ellesmere Road to the width of a six lane expressway is on par with what was attempted many decades ago when Highway 400 was proposed to be extended south to the Gardner Expressway through residential neighbourhoods? Forcing expressways or 6 lane arterial roads through quiet established residential neighbourhoods not designed for them should never be considered.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:09

The widening of Ellesmere Road to six lanes is only being proposed west of Morningside Avenue. In the segment between Morningside Avenue and Meadowvale Road the existing number of lanes will be maintained. East of Meadowvale Road, the existing lanes will be widened to permit two car lanes and two transit lanes.  

In segments of the corridor outside of the identified 'pinch-point' areas, the number of existing general traffic lanes is being maintained. 

For more information on the current design please visit the Preliminary Design tab on Metrolinx Engage. 

Anonymous's avatar

Ellesmere Rd is busy as it is. combination of residents and businesses all along Ellesmere. this BRT project will destroy this entire community. limiting left turns into and out of houses and businesses and forced U-turns will be chaotic. U turns can be a huge safety issue for pedestrians, not to mention the traffic backlogs it will cause. No left turns will drive businesses away as we have seen from other parts of the city where similar projects took place.

the length of construction is also another issue. its estimated 4 years, but we all know it may take twice the time. the hardship this will cause to local residents and businesses is unimaginable.

businesses that are along Ellesmere are very unique and established for many years. we take pride of these small businesses. we should not let anyone make such change of infrastructure that will cause loos of these businesses which creating employment for many families.

Improvement is necessary in all aspects but not at the cost of a community.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:18

For safety reasons, a raised centre island is added with Bus Rapid Transit.

The raised median is also critical to managing left turning traffic and discouraging drivers from crossing over the BRT lanes. The lanes are most efficient when they are used exclusively for transit vehicles.  With the raised center median, the only area where cars will cross the BRT route is at signalized intersections.                                                                                                                                                                                                     

Metrolinx has an established community benefits and supports program to ensure that residents, businesses and communities can realize the benefits that these major transit projects will bring to their communities.

On the DSBRT, Metrolinx in partnership with the various project delivery partners, will implement a suite of flexible and responsive community and business support initiatives. In addition to construction mitigation, these will include opportunities for employment and for procurement.

AL's avatar

Would Metrolinx be willing to take an independent survey of residents and business owners in Highland Creek to find out if they want this centre median DSBRT and if they want any section of Ellesmere widened to 6 lanes? If not, why not?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:19

The segment of Ellesmere Road between Conlins Road and Kingston Road will operate as a 4-lane roadway, with one lane of general traffic in each direction and one BRT lane in each direction. Maintaining the 4-lane roadway between Conlins Road and Meadowvale Road was implemented to address concerns that were raised by the local community, and in consultation with the City of Toronto.  

Anonymous's avatar

I have become concerned since seeing the bike lane implementations on the Danforth this past two years, as well as the situation that exists at the intersection of Woodbine and Kingston Road, that liberties are being taken with lane widths in at least some of the areas where bike lanes are being implemented in the City at present. I'm willing to support the Ellesmere proposal if it is realistic, and hope that if indeed it is, that Metrolinx might also consider taking an active role in reviewing existing lanes elsewhere in the City, such as the ones mentioned, in an effort to truly advance the plight of everyone involved. To this end, I'm suggesting that Metrolinx adopt a no alcohol, tobacco, caffeine, recreational drugs, and, or, non-nutritious, cake, pie, candy, and soda pop, policy, and a start of the workday light exercise routine, in an effort to optimise relaxed acuity, ability, and agility.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:20

In some areas of the City of Toronto, there are significant space constraints and a number of solutions have been adopted to address the limited public road space. For this project, the design of the cycling facilities meets the standards set forth by the City. 

Anonymous's avatar

Why not just have express buses from Durham? Why disrupt our neighbourhood? How will Metrolinx benefit people along Ellesmere and the surrounding area?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:21

The Durham-Scarborough BRT is more than just a bus route. Improved bus stop amenities, such as offboard fare collection and next bus arrival signage, will help ensure a smooth, pleasant travel experience. Frequent service along dedicated lanes will improve the reliability of the bus, not only saving you time, but also attracting more transit riders. Additionally, as ridership and demand increase, BRT service can easily adapt to customer needs, which will ensure the quality of the service is maintained.

Improvements will include:

  • Next Bus arrival signage
  • Benches and accessible waiting areas
  • Off-board fare collection
  • Map and local area information to orient riders
  • Weather protection
  • Garbage cans
  • Station identification signage, to assist riders to know where they are as they travel
Anonymous's avatar

Can you enlighten us on how long the construction will take and when can someone expect to take the DSBRT from STC? Will the bike lanes on Ellesmere be completed before then?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:22

The project will be delivered in a phased approach. Exact timing will be refined over the next year when the TPAP concludes and we move into the detailed design stage.

In each segment, construction will be completed over one to three construction seasons. Work will begin in areas where there are fewer space and congestion constrains. The exact sequence of construction has not yet been determined. It will also be determined by funding availability, property acquisition, design development, other road works in the corridor and on adjacent streets and potentially utility upgrades such as sewer upgrades or hydro works.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:22

Thank you for your participation in our virtual open house. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 23, 2021 - 18:22

Do Metrolinx/TTC have plans to bring airport express bus to Scarborough? The current travel time is about 1 hour and 20 mins and involve 2 transfers.

Stops:
Pearson Airport
Scarborough Town Centre
"""All Stops on BRT lane until Sheppard/Port-Union"""

Estimated Travel Time: 45 mins + Hwy 401 congestion.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:23

Our region is growing quickly, and we must continue the work underway to ensure that people can get to where they need to go, today and in the future. The Eglinton Crosstown West Extension (ECWE) would offer convenient links to other destinations throughout the region – UP Express and Kitchener Line GO Train service at Mount Dennis, TTC bus services at all transit stops in Toronto, and MiWay and GO Bus services via the Mississauga Transitway at Renforth Drive.

Plans are also being explored with the Greater Toronto Airports Authority to extend the line another 4.7 kilometres to Pearson International Airport would allow for a direct connection from Pearson Airport to the Kennedy Station transit hub in Scarborough  

Anonymous's avatar

Between Ellesmere and Kingston rd.
It was not paved red.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:23

Red asphalt is the standard for most Bus Rapid Transit systems, as it does not lose its visibility the way painted pavement markings tend to do over time. The asphalt uses both red aggregate and red dye that are added to the asphalt. As the pavement ages, it continues to look almost as red as the day it was installed. In some areas where traffic will be permitted in the BRT lane(s), red painted stripes may be used instead of red asphalt, which will be determined during detail design.

Coloured BRT lanes help drivers understand that they are for the BRT. This has been successfully used along Highway 7 for the viva system and creates an identifiable system that reminds the public and drivers of the priority given to transit along the corridor.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:24

The Initial Business Case for the DSBRT predicts 3,000-4,000 passengers per hour through the busiest sections. Subways are designed to carry significantly higher volumes of passengers than BRT, typically, 20,000 - 30,000 passengers per hour.  

Subways are much more expensive to implement and take longer to construct than BRT, due to the additional infrastructure requirements. With BRT, the project is similar to other road widening projects, and utility relocations are localized to facilitate road widening and BRT stops. In addition to being a more cost-effective solution based on current and future ridership projections, BRT also provides more flexibility than a single route. Additional bus routes can use the same lanes for part of their trip – but serve other areas.  Other routes could run along part of the DSBRT corridor and then turn off the route to serve other communities or major destinations off the corridor. This operational flexibility will allow more passengers to have a one-seat ride, saving them time and transfers.

Anonymous's avatar

Cannot TTC can use existing Ellesmere road structure through this section. DSBRT could use this diversion around Highland Creek coming back down Ellesmere to U of T and then continue west on the centre priority lane design. There are no businesses along this Ellesmere section and only the U of T being the largest target for riders.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:24

With rapid growth in the past decade - and an expectation that travel demand will continue to increase - better transit will be needed to link communities and employment on both sides of the Toronto-Durham boundary.

Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) was identified as the preferred transit option to link Durham Region and Scarborough through the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) and the Durham Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit (DSBRT) Initial Business Case (IBC).

Metrolinx worked with GTHA municipalities to review and assess the transportation needs of various corridors in the GTHA, including Ellesmere Road/Highway 2 and Sheppard Avenue. Ellesmere Road was selected as the preferred route for several reasons:

·        It provides the most direct connection between Downtown Oshawa and Scarborough Centre. Ridership is highest between Pickering and Scarborough. The corridor also directly connects the Region’s Urban Growth Centres (UGCs) in both municipalities as well as University of Toronto Scarborough Campus (UTSC) and the future subway.

·         It maximizes use of the existing network - TTC can increase feeder routes to service the busway which significantly increases transit access to Scarborough residents. Residents in Scarborough will have substantially more transit service available to them as both TTC and DRT will serve the corridor.

·         Travel time increases substantially using Sheppard Avenue as it isn’t a direct connection to the major trip generators between Durham and Toronto. It also does not service UTSC or the future subway as effectively. 

·         The DSBRT and the proposed Eglinton East LRT (EELRT) along Ellesmere Road have been planned in conjunction with the UTSC master plan which would see realignment of Military Trail further east. There is no way to effectively serve UTSC via Sheppard Avenue without creating additional congestion and conflicts with the EELRT, and general traffic along Ellesmere Road

·         It connects to future service planning initiatives including the EELRT which are important components of the Frequent Rapid Transit Network (FRTN). 

·         Sheppard Avenue is already planned for an LRT.

Anonymous's avatar

Please come up with another design for this area
One lane will not be enough for cars

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:25

The traffic analysis completed for the area indicates that one lane of traffic in each direction will be adequate beyond 2041.  

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:25

The DSBRT project extends from Scarborough Center (specifically the new bus terminal proposed for the Scarborough Subway), south on Grangeway Avenue to Ellesmere Road, east to Kingston Road, and east along the Highway 2 corridor to downtown Oshawa at Simcoe Street.

Anonymous's avatar

Ellesmere traffic will be diverted up Bellamy to Progress Ave to Markham Road to Ellesmere. If incorrect, METROLINX should publicize incorrect advertising that has been around for at least a month.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:27

With the addition of BRT lanes, left turns in and out of driveways and unsignalized local streets will no longer be permitted. Cars and small trucks will continue to the next signalized intersection and make a protected U-turn. 

For larger trucks, the U-turn movement will not be possible. Trucks would either plan their approach and reroute themselves to avoid the left turn, as it often done by commercial vehicle operators, or they can travel "around the block" to replace the left turn.  

For this small number of vehicles exiting businesses on the north side of Ellesmere Road and needing to continue east or north, they would turn right and use Bellamy or Progress Avenues to get to Markham Road or eastbound Ellesmere Road.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:27

We apologize for any technical issues during the virtual open house and thank you for your feedback. As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we added a call-in option to provide an opportunity for as many people as possible to learn more about the project and ask questions directly to our panel. 

We are continuing to refine our virtual engagement format based on feedback like this and hope you were able to complete the post-event survey. 

Anonymous's avatar

The size of this project will disrupt the traffic for 10 years here based on your performance on Eglinton. Just put smart signals in, and the need for separate bus lanes goes away. If you are running every 5 minutes 24hours a day instead of 4, it might be useful, otherwise it is a waste. 100 % reliable is required - and once a bus breaks down, the entire system is down. I've observed 4 broken busses today, which are still blocking traffic 6 hours later.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:28

The plan is to construct the project in manageable segments, limiting construction in any one area to one or two construction seasons. The dedicated lanes are required to achieve the degree of separation from general traffic needed to provide the reliability and speed benefits that will improve ridership.  

Anonymous's avatar

I am one of the people who will be affected by the DSBRT project. One of the impacts is that we will not be able to do a left turn to the street where we live along Ellesmere Road from Conlins Road all the way to the bus loop going east. If this project will push through, the only benefit we can get out of it is we can board the buses from the bus stop close to where I live. Currently, the Durham Transit buses can only stop at U of T Scarborough and at Meadowvale Road which are quite far from where we live. If you can add more bus stops between U of T and Meadowvale, it would be much better.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:29

The intention is to allow the DRT buses to operate in the City of Toronto, and to serve customers at all stops along the way. The route will be extended west of the UTSC campus to Scarborough Center giving local residents more service and more choice.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 23, 2021 - 19:20

The alternatives looked at.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:29

The project documentation and the prior studies have looked at a full range of options including different corridors, and different ways to provide the service. We believe the current plan balances the needs of the community while maintaining a high-degree of transit service and reliability and benefit to the region. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 16, 2021 - 19:37

Will this BRT line really has 4 stops?
If no, then how many?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:30

The proposed 36 km DSBRT route will have 49-stops, generally placed every 730 m. The stop map can be found on the home page here: https://www.metrolinxengage.com/en/engagement-initiatives/durham-scarbor...

Peter's avatar
Sep 10, 2021 - 14:44

Will this service provide reasonably priced, seamless (direct) and convenient transportation for the thousands of students living in Halton and Peel Regions who attend Mohawk College and McMaster University.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:31

Our region is growing quickly, and we must continue the work underway to ensure that people can get to where they need to go, today and in the future.                                                                        

Durham-Scarborough BRT: The proposed Durham-Scarborough BRT line consists of 36 kilometres of bus rapid transit that would serve Oshawa, Whitby, Ajax, Pickering and Scarborough. Improved transit along Highway 2 across the Toronto and Durham boundary would link communities, employment, schools and other major destinations in the Region.

The proposed project aims to create seamless connections with local transit networks, providing the residents of Durham Region and the City of Toronto more flexibility and choice to get where they need to go, faster and more reliably.                                                                                                  

Dundas BRT: Metrolinx is continuing to advance planning for the Dundas Bus Rapid Transit (BRT). The proposed BRT corridor would run along a 48 kilometre stretch of Dundas Street from Highway 6 in the City of Hamilton, through to the Kipling Transit Hub in the City of Toronto, linking Etobicoke and Mississauga City Centres. For more information on the Dundas BRT project visit Metrolinx Engage (https://www.metrolinxengage.com/en/engagement-initiatives/dundasbrt

Layperson 's avatar

The dedicated pathway will you folks possibly plan for a underground rapid system or above ground rapid system with the destination goal for Oshawa? An anology would be back in the early 1900's the Bloor viaduct had a plan for a subway platform running under the bridge.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:31

LRT is much more expensive to implement and takes longer to construct than BRT, due to the additional infrastructure requirements, such as the rails, electric power supply, and additional costs associated with relocating utilities that run in the centre of the road underneath the tracks. Whereas with BRT, the project is similar to other road widening projects, and utility relocations are localized to facilitate road widening and BRT stops.

In addition to being a more cost-effective solution based on current and future ridership projections, BRT also provides more flexibility than a single route. Additional bus routes can use the same lanes for part of their trip – but serve other areas.  Other routes could run along part of the DSBRT corridor and then turn off the route to serve other communities or major destinations off the corridor. This operational flexibility will allow more passengers to have a one-seat ride, saving them time and transfers.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 17, 2021 - 17:48

Good morning/afternoon.
My name is Mike ----, I live in whitby.
Hwy#2 is a great escape if there's an accident on the 401 hwy. I feel if you do your bus route there,and something happens on the 401 hwy, hwy is a great alternative. However if you were to do your bus route along Roseland you would be able to expand further into Durham and beyond alot easier that issues at hwy #2.
Thanks in advance Mike ----

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Nov 29, 2021 - 13:31

One of the key reasons for the dedicated lanes, beyond the benefits they bring for more reliable transit, is the way they will protect the service from the impact of incidents elsewhere in the network.  

Alternate routes such as Rossland and Taunton Roads were assessed, however, they do not connect the regional growth centers. The 900 PULSE serve currently running along the corridor is the busiest route in the DRT system, and with the planned increases in population and employment in the Region will only continue to get busier.