> Dundas Bus Rapid Transit Project Live Meeting - September 22, 2021 | Metrolinx Engage

Dundas Bus Rapid Transit Project Live Meeting - September 22, 2021

On September 22, 2021, Metrolinx hosted a presentation and question-and-answer session which included speakers from our Dundas Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project team. During the one hour open house, we answered as many questions as possible about the Dundas BRT project. Participants voted on questions and were particularly interested in hearing about project design, schedule, as well as potential future property impacts.

In case you missed the live event, you may find a copy of the presentation as well a link to the full recording below. We are committed to answering all questions received as part of the live event, and written answers to all questions will be posted at the bottom of this page.

If you are interested in learning more about the Dundas BRT project, visit Metrolinx Engage.

Agenda

6:30PM - 7:00PM: Project Update

7:00PM - 7:30PM: Questions and Answers

 

Meet the Speakers

Maria G. Doyle

Maria G. Doyle

Manager (A), Transportation Policy - Metrolinx

Darcy Wiltshire

Darcy Wiltshire

Environmental Project Manager – Metrolinx

Greg Medulun

Greg Medulun

Director Community Engagement – Metrolinx

Matthew Williams

Matthew Williams

Project Leader – City of Mississauga

Kevin Phillips, Project Manager, AECOM

Kevin Phillips

Project Manager, AECOM

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 8, 2021 - 20:58

The downtown stretch of Waterdown is extremely tight and always backed up with cars and construction vehicles.
How will the buses negotiate this area?
BTW, LOVE this bus idea!!!!! Kudos to all involved.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:27

The Project Team recognizes that Waterdown is a constrained area. With that said, this area is not identified as a pinch point. In terms of existing traffic and improving buses moving through the corridor, the Project Team would consider implementing transit signal priority measures so buses can advance through intersections quicker.

Additionally, the City of Hamilton as gone through a planning process as well, the City’s Waterdown/Aldershot Transportation Master Plan identifies a number of improvements to traffic flow in this area. The City of Hamilton has started the planning for these improvements and in the next several years they will begin implementing segments of the improvements.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 9, 2021 - 00:10

how will this BRT line connect to Kipling station?
Will it connect within the existing regional bus terminal or will it connect to the station below-grade

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:32

The Dundas BRT will connect to the existing Kipling Transit Hub which services multiple transit providers (i.e., MiWay, TTC Subway). Details on how the BRT service will interface with the Kipling Transit Hub have yet to be identified but will be confirmed through future design development and the development of a routing and service strategy. It is not envisioned that the BRT service will connect to the hub below grade. 

Anonymous's avatar

What impacts to the lands within the Southeast quadrant of Dixie Road and Dundas Street are anticipated if a physical service line connection is proposed?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:38

The Project Team is currently developing the routing and service strategy, which will assess service options for the entire corridor, including the connections to municipal service providers and existing and future transit facilities. A link to the Dixie GO Station was contained in the Dundas Connects Master Plan. At this time, a direct off-corridor connection to the Dixie GO Station will likely not be considered; however, as the routing and service strategy is not yet final, additional opportunities for direct off-corridor connection to service the Dixie GO Station may be explored and a Dundas BRT stop is proposed along Dundas Street at Dixie Road.  

August's avatar

Currently, stops have been identified for the eastern Mississauga section (great!). When can we expect stop sites to be identified in western Mississauga or other sections?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:55

Eight proposed stops within the Mississauga East segment have been identified. Dundas BRT Station Stops within the Toronto, Mississauga West and Halton/Hamilton segments have not yet been finalized. Stops will be confirmed through development of the design, which in part will be based on the locations identified within the Dundas Connects Master Plan Study and the Initial Business Case (IBC), current transit facilities and intersecting bus routes, the distance between stops, and land use and major trip generators in the area. Local transit services currently operating within the project study area will be integrated with the Dundas BRT service. During future public and stakeholder engagement, more specific details will be shared for review and comment. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 17:34

What kind of service can operate on the BRT corridor?

Can GO bus operate on it?
Can local route get in/out of the corridor to service local stops/Go train stations?
Will there be an airport route that use Hwy 427 to Pearson airport?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:52

There are two types of bus services to keep in mind. There are BRT-type express buses and local buses. Part of the Dundas BRT project is to determine an operator of service, which could be GO Transit, or a combination of a variety of transit service providers in area. If the operator of Dundas BRT is a local transit provider, then yes, the BRT guideway could be shared with other express services. There will also be a local service overlay where riders can connect to local bus services, which will travel along general traffic lanes. 

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 9, 2021 - 00:04

How many stops will this BRT line service ?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:30

Eight proposed stops within the Mississauga East segment have been identified. Dundas BRT Station Stops within the Toronto, Mississauga West and Halton/Hamilton segments have not yet been finalized. Stops will be confirmed through development of the design, which in part will be based on the locations identified within the Dundas Connects Master Plan Study and the Initial Business Case (IBC), current transit facilities and intersecting bus routes, the distance between stops, and land use and major trip generators in the area. Local transit services currently operating within the project study area will be integrated with the Dundas BRT service. During future public and stakeholder engagement, more specific details will be shared for review and comment. 

Anonymous's avatar

Currently the planned route comes to a dead end in the Clappison's Corners area. In order for residents of Waterdown which is part of the City of Hamilton to get to downtown Hamilton or McMaster University they must take HSR to Aldershot, then either GO Transit or Burlington Transit into Hamilton. Can extending the route to include Clappison's to McMaster to Hamilton GO be incorporated in the planning? This would not only benefit people from the Waterdown area but also those living in northern Oakville and Burlington that may want to commute to university or work.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:35

The Dundas BRT project limits end at Highway 6 in Hamilton; however, buses (i.e., local buses) move beyond the corridor. The Project Team is looking at various transit routing and service options along the corridor and how they would link with the various existing transit services in the area (including Hamilton Street Railway (HSR)). The transit service routing study will identify the preferred transit service concepts.

Anonymous's avatar

Look to best practices abroad (not just in Europe and North America - there are other countries, too!):
-All-electric transit (modern battery tech, rapid-charge at stations, or by overhead wire)
-Covered transit lanes with solar shaders (at a minimum at station stops)
-Protected cycle-tracks for full length with metal/concrete LED bollards powered by solar mentioned
-Permeable and ground-source heated pavement (no issues of salt, sand, rain or snow!)
-Generous urban tree canopy with proper water capture and irrigation systems to ensure long-term health
-Wifi on all buses with TOA linked to buses at every stop on digital signage
-Digital interactive maps highlighting local transit connections, shops, trails and destinations

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:36

In recent years, Metrolinx has invested significant energy in planning for climate adaptation, resiliency and sustainability, which has most recently included the refreshing of the Sustainability Strategy in 2021 along with revised goals and actions which are more specific, and the release of Sustainable Design Standards. The application of the Sustainable Design Standards will be mandatory for the design of all new, expanded and reconstructed Metrolinx buildings and facilities in the future.  

As part of this Project, a Climate Change and Sustainability Report has been prepared, which reviews the effects the Project has on climate change (greenhouse gas) and the effects of climate change on the Project (climate change resilience). It also highlights some of the broader sustainability initiatives that Metrolinx is currently undertaking or has planned in relation to the construction and operation of the Project, with the goal of improving environmental and social outcomes. More details will be made available in the Climate Change and Sustainability Report in late-2021. 

Anonymous's avatar

How might this impact landowners between Dixie BRT at the intersection of Dixie/Dundas and the Go Station lands?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:04

The Project Team is currently developing the routing and service strategy, which will assess service options for the entire corridor, including the connections to municipal service providers and existing and future transit facilities. A link to the Dixie GO Station was contained in the Dundas Connects Master Plan. At this time, a direct off-corridor connection to the Dixie GO Station will likely not be considered; however, as the routing and service strategy is not yet final, additional opportunities for direct off-corridor connection to service the Dixie GO Station may be explored and a Dundas BRT stop is proposed along Dundas Street at Dixie Road.  

Anonymous's avatar

There was a quote that average travel time would be reduced by 14 minutes. That seems very minor for most people. As well, has the MRT been studied for its effectiveness? I have never seen many people at the stations or on the buses since its beginning and know of no one who has ever taken it.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:37

A number of studies have been conducted identifying and supporting the implementation of BRT and BRT measures along the Dundas Street corridor.  This includes Metrolinx’s 2041 Regional Transportation Plan, the Frequent Rapid Transit Network Prioritization study (2019), and the Dundas BRT Initial Business Case (2020), as well as the City of Mississauga’s Dundas Connects Corridor Master Plan (2018). Implementation of BRT has many benefits to support the project, it will: allow for faster, more reliable and more frequent transit service along Dundas Street; shorten commute times, with an ~14 minutes reduction in the average trip time; attract new ridership (~31,000 new riders per day); reduce greenhouse gas emissions; and improve connections for jobs, residents, and to other transit services that operate along the Dundas Street corridor.

Anonymous's avatar

Is there future planning for LRT as part of this. at least at start between Kipling and end of Mississauga.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:17

The current corridor design, with respect to the alignment geometry and the stop geometry, protects for possibility of the corridor being converted to an LRT system in the future. However, LRT design/planning is not included within the scope of the Dundas BRT project.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 18:51

Despite pinch points and other planning irregularities in the ROW, along with differing municipal considerations, is there absolute commitment to providing cycling facilities the entire length of the corridor, at least through Mississauga?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:56

This project is about more than just transit; the Project Team is aiming to provide a multi-modal corridor that accommodates all users, including cyclists. The Project Team is looking at cycle tracks as well as multi-use paths/trails. The Dundas Connects Master Plan included a commitment to provide safe cycling infrastructure along the length of the Dundas Street corridor in Mississauga. 

The City of Mississauga also has a Cycling Master Plan which is an important part of our overall strategy and includes cycle infrastructure as well (Cycling Master Plan – City of Mississauga). 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 19:13

Currently, Mississauga's #1 - Dundas bus route goes into the UTM Campus. What implications will this have to servicing students directly onto campus?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:36

The transit routing and service strategy, including identifying key linking nodes such as the University of Toronto Mississauga campus, is to be determined through the next phases of the study.   

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 19:42

How will property owners be compensated for property appropriated for the construction of the BRT?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:38

Property may need to be acquired temporarily or permanently to support the construction and operation of this transit project. The Project Team is making every effort to minimize project impacts on the community. Once the Project Team determines which sections of work may impact private properties, the team will reach out to all potentially impacted residents/property owners. To learn more about Metrolinx’s property acquisition process, including compensation, visit: https://www.metrolinx.com/en/greaterregion/projects/property-acquisitions.aspx.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 9, 2021 - 00:06

will some of the BRT stops be elevated like the Mississauga Transitway

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:05

Elevated BRT transitway and stops, similar to the Mississauga Transitway, were considered but screened out as part of the Dundas Connects Master Plan Study.

Anonymous's avatar

Have the operations of the BRT been considered or will this be considered as the design is advanced?
Will the majority of trunk services be provided by Metrolinx and feeder services provided by the municipalities, since it now runs between numerous municipalities?
Will a special fare program be maintained/introduced along the corridor to reduce double (or even triple) fares from transferring from the BRT to municipal transit services?
Will the design allow for feeder buses to access the BRT at key intersections to provide easy access to the BRT and flexibility for the municipalities to also use the BRT for portions of local routes?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:54

In late 2021, during the third round of public engagement, preliminary information related to servicing concepts will be shared for public feedback. 

Regarding the fare system, currently there is a co-fare system between GO Transit and some 905 transit operators in the Region. The Project Team is working with partners to better integrate transit fares across the Region to make it easier to take transit in this area. The goal is to create a comprehensive package for service and fares in the area. At this point, this initiative is with the Ministry of Transportation (MTO) separate from the Dundas BRT project. 

Eroslava's avatar

Halton Region is currently expanding Dundas Street/Hwy 5 to six lanes.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:27

Halton Region is an important stakeholder in relation to this study. Halton Region, together with the Town of Oakville, City of Burlington and City of Hamilton, will continue to be engaged as planning progresses. 

Anonymous's avatar

Does widening have the potential to delay the project? If so then why would we want to spend the extra time and money on that?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:18

Dundas BRT project-related widening is being considered for constrained traffic right-of-way sections along the corridor, such as the Cooksville pinchpoint section, which would otherwise see significant traffic impacts if the existing traffic lanes are reduced. The Project Team is working closely with municipalities, stakeholders, agencies, and local communities to fully assess the right balance between benefits and costs as works on the preliminary design, including road widening, progresses.

Anonymous's avatar

I have heard that residents and businesses may prefer the Mississauga West section to be in the median west of Mississauga Road. Would that be something that the planners consider?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:19

The City of Mississauga’s Dundas Connects Corridor Master Plan reviewed various high-order transit technologies and BRT concepts, and based on the corridor needs, anticipated ridership and transition to the potential curbside operations in Oakville, it was recommended that curbside BRT be implemented along Dundas Street from Mississauga Road westerly. The Dundas BRT Project Team will be incorporating the findings of the Dundas Connects Master Plan (including technical studies and public feedback) into the ongoing Dundas BRT Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP).

Anonymous's avatar

The foundations of the houses in the credit woodland area nest to Dundas poor and that the houses shake and crack when a bus or heavy trucks pass it will become worse as you move it closer to the houses. I am not certain that these house could withstand so mush heavy traffic.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:39

The Project Team is looking at two design alternatives in this area, both of which stay within the existing road allowance. For both alternatives, the vast majority of buses would be operating within median BRT lanes in the centre of the road corridor – which increases the separation distance between the buses and the Credit Woodlands Court properties. Increased distance between buses and properties reduces the magnitude and frequency of vibration at the properties. 

Another significant factor in the generation of vibrations is the road surface condition (for example, potholes). The repaving associated with this project would prevent vibrations caused by uneven road surface conditions. A Noise and Vibration Report is being completed as part of this project which will discuss noise and vibration assessment for both operations of the BRT as well as the construction phase.  This report will be available for public review as part of the Environmental Project Report (EPR).  

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 19, 2021 - 17:02

Will there be a connection to Hamilton HSR?
Departing from Kipling and being able to connect to the Hamilton transit system would be so convenient.
This would reduce commute time immensely. Currently, going from the Kipling area to downtown Toronto to get a Hamilton bound bus/train is nearly a 2-hour commute just to get to downtown Hamilton.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 11:57

The proposed Dundas BRT project limits does end at Highway 6, however buses (i.e., local buses) move beyond the corridor. The Project Team is looking at various transit routing and service options along the corridor and how they would link with the various existing transit services in the area (including HSR). The transit service routing study will identify the preferred transit service concepts.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 18:45

I am a graduate level urban planning student with a focus on transportation infrastructure, as well as a resident of Mississauga living right on the Dundas St corridor. Will there be any student job or co-op opportunities available over the course of the project, or any other way to get more involved in the development of the project?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:41

Community involvement and feedback through each stage of the project is important. As project planning progresses, there will be more opportunities to get involved. To learn how to get involved, visit metrolinxengage.com/DundasBRT. If you would like to sign up for project updates, please let us know. 

To learn more about employment opportunities with Metrolinx, please visit our careers webpage: https://www.metrolinx.com/en/aboutus/careers/careers.aspx. Here you will find information about capital projects, opportunities for corporate, operations and student/graduate positions, a list of current employment opportunities, guidance on how to apply and frequently asked questions.

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 18:46

Has this project decision been finalized or is there still the possibility of this project not happening because of lack of support from the people/taxpayers?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:30

The proposed Dundas BRT project will go through several stages before construction. At this point, the Dundas BRT project is in an early design phase. Until the Project Team advances the project to detailed design, the outcome of the project and what it will look like is unknown. 

Anonymous's avatar

Do Metrolinx and Mississauga plan to evolve the design of the BRT beyond the recommendations of Dundas Connects? Would you be considering additional stations (e.g. Erindale Park)? Or a different design for the segment west of The Credit Woodlands?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:34

The Dundas Connects Master Plan received a lot of public feedback which helped shape the proposed Dundas BRT concept. This phase of engagement is to collect feedback regarding this proposed design and we welcome all comments and feedback. 

During the presentation, the Project Team identified key information regarding the Mississauga East segment (including proposed stop locations). However, as project planning progresses, the Project Team will identify stop locations along the entire Dundas BRT corridor. Stops for Mississauga West will be presented at a future round of engagement. 

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:03

Yes, the current Dundas BRT corridor design accommodates protected cycling facilities which are located within the boulevard space either adjacent to the curb line (separated by the barrier curb) or adjacent to the edge of the right-of-way (property), separated by the barrier curb.

Anonymous's avatar

Will this bridge over the Milton GO rail corridor be replaced as part of the BRT project? If so will the design of the bridge ensure that there is room on the railway corridor below to add more tracks so Milton GO Line trains can run two way all day and frequent service?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:54

The recommendations for the Dundas Street East over Hensall Circle and CP Bridge have yet to be finalized, however, one potential alternative is the replacement of the structure. Under this alternative the replacement bridge would span the existing rail corridor right-of-way (property). There are no plans that the Project Team is aware of to widen the rail corridor right-of-way in this area, so any new track infrastructure, i.e., additional tracks, would need to fit within the existing right-of-way. Infrastructure improvements for this bridge will also be coordinated with CP Rail.   

Having said that, Metrolinx does not own the CP corridor and must work with our rail partners in order to operate our services in parallel. Metrolinx has been continuing negotiations with CP as we work together towards improved two-way service on the Milton corridor. 
 
In addition to continued collaboration with CP, Metrolinx has other projects underway on the Milton corridor that will help plan for future increased service levels, including accessibility improvements at Streetsville, Lisgar and Erindale and the recently completed redevelopment of Cooksville GO. 

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Sep 22, 2021 - 19:37

Will there be coordination between local transit stops and BRT stops?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:38

It is envisioned that the Dundas BRT will still be complemented with the existing local transit services in the area. Generally, existing local transit stops will remain in their current locations; however, this is being reviewed as part of the development of the routing and service strategy. 

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 15, 2021 - 14:26

How many stops and where are they planned for the Waterdown area along Dundas.
I see the 'end' of the BRT is at the corner of Hwy 5 & 6. Is there a plan for the route to end at CoreSlab or in the Hamilton Technology Centre?
How will this link / connect with existing bus routes / Hamilton's HSR?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:24

The proposed Dundas BRT project limits does end at Highway 6, however buses (i.e., local buses) move beyond the corridor. The Project Team is looking at various transit routing and service options along the corridor and how they would link with the various existing transit services in the area (including HSR). The transit service routing study will identify the preferred transit service concepts. 

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:26

Property may need to be acquired temporarily or permanently to support the construction and operation of this transit project. The Project Team is making every effort to minimize project impacts on the community. Once the Project Team determines which sections of work may impact private properties, the team will reach out to all potentially impacted residents/property owners. At this point in the planning process, it is too early to comment on exact property impacts. It is important to understand that for this project to be successful, effective community engagement between the Project Team and the public must take place – we are dedicated to working with the community every step of the way. To learn more about Metrolinx’s property acquisition process, visit: https://www.metrolinx.com/en/greaterregion/projects/property-acquisition...

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 18:35

Will additional land be required along the Dundas ROW or is the current width of the ROW sufficient for the BRT? Have municipal governments or Metrolinx already begun any expropriation or is there any land already along the corridor designated for this project?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:13

This project is still in the early ‘preliminary’ design phase. As part of the Transit Project Assessment Process (TPAP) or Environmental Assessment process, the Project Team develops a high-level conceptual plan in order to identify any potential impacts to properties and related mitigations including minimizing property impacts, wherever possible.  

With regards to the Cooksville pinch point, the Project Team is exploring opportunities to mitigate potential impacts to properties where possible, including optimization of the corridor alignment, application of minimum design standards and a reduction in the boulevard space that could be widened through future redevelopment.  

This ongoing TPAP stage for the pinch point will identify the maximum level of property impacts. Further reduction in property impacts is expected as we progress through the detailed design phase of the project. 

As the property requirements have not yet been finalized, discussions on land acquisition have not yet taken place.  

Anonymous's avatar
Sep 22, 2021 - 18:36

How will the BRT navigate through the intersection of Dundas St W and Hurontario Rd in Mississauga?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:27

The best performing design alternative for the Cooksville pinch point (constrained area), which includes the intersection of Dundas Street West and Hurontario Street, proposes a median BRT facility. This intersection would operate similar to any of the other intersections within the Mississauga East segment. The Dundas BRT service would operate within the median BRT facilities and would advance through the intersection either utilizing a standard traffic signalling system or a transit priority traffic signalling system. The Dundas BRT service would also be coordinated with the future Hurontario Light Rail Transit (LRT) project in order to minimize Hurontario LRT impacts and provide for connection between these services.

Eroslava's avatar

In the Burlington BRT corridor there is a high school, library, community centre, park and dog park. How you going to ensure the safety of students and pedestrians, of all abilities, to cross Dundas Street/Hwy 5.
Will you be providing underground tunnels under Dundas Street/Hwy 5 so that ALL pedestrians can cross safely?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:17

Pedestrian and cyclist safety is a key consideration being addressed as part of the Dundas BRT corridor design. Stop platform designs will feature numerous proposed pedestrian safety and accessibility related elements, such as tactile warning strips, access ramps and railings and cross walks that tie into the median BRT stop platforms. With respect to cyclists, the current corridor design includes dedicated cycling facilities which are located within the boulevard space separated from the adjacent roadway by a barrier curb. 

Anonymous's avatar

Is Toronto on the same pace (and page) as Mississauga? Because the design of the BRT between Subway Crescent (or Aukland Road) and Etobicoke Creek will be impacted by whatever Toronto plans to do, and how quickly they do it.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:35

As part of the Dundas Connects Master Plan, BRT guideway/infrastructure approvals were provided for Mississauga. The City of Toronto was consulted on the potential to connect the corridor through to Kipling station; however, a Toronto solution has not been through an environmental approvals process yet. As part of the Dundas BRT study, there is a Toronto segment. The Project Team will be working with the City of Toronto to identify potential concepts to bring a guideway/ BRT infrastructure all the way to Kipling station in Toronto. With that said, the Toronto portion of the study is not on the same pace as Mississauga East, as planning in Mississauga East was advanced to meet requirements of the Investing in Canada Infrastructure Program (ICIP) Federal funding application. The Project Team will continue to engage with the public, stakeholders and City of Toronto later this year and through 2022. 

Anonymous's avatar

Will construction for Cooksville section of the BRT be scheduled to coincide with LRT construction work? (That is - please don’t dig up the intersection twice)

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:37

Typically, Metrolinx works with municipalities to identify parallel projects so work can be coordinated. Unfortunately, it is not a possibility in this case as construction for the Hurontario LRT has already begun and Dundas BRT is a few years away from construction.  However, future construction projects in the area will be coordinated with Dundas BRT construction, where possible. 

Anonymous's avatar

between the old Girl Guide Hall and the Erindale Presbyterian Church?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:41

The Erindale Valley Pinch Point (constrained area) runs along Dundas Street, from The Credit Woodlands to Mississauga Road, and contains the intersection of Dundas Street West and Robinson Street. 

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 13:19

We apologize if you were experiencing technical difficulties during the presentation. The recording of the presentation is posted above for those who missed the live meeting.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:16

Property may need to be acquired temporarily or permanently to support the construction and operation of this transit project. The Project Team is making every effort to minimize project impacts on the community. Once the Project Team determines which sections of work may impact private properties, the team will reach out to all potentially impacted residents/property owners. At this point in the planning process, it is too early to comment on exact property impacts. It is important to understand that for this project to be successful, effective community engagement between the Project Team and the public must take place – we are dedicated to working with the community every step of the way. To learn more about Metrolinx’s property acquisition process, visit: https://www.metrolinx.com/en/greaterregion/projects/property-acquisition...

Anonymous's avatar

Colin Tyler
*** This is the most important consideration for the people of East Mississauga *** 50 Years ago Dundas St. from Etobicoke to Cawthra Rd. was 2 lanes each way. It was expanded to 3 lanes each way to accommodate population & vehicular growth both consumer and business travel. The current BRT proposal ELIMINATES 2 LANES OF DEDICATED VEHICULAR TRAVEL back to 2 LANES EACH WAY!! In the meantime, Mississauga has grown, on average, way over 100,000 people per decade... and the fact is... THERE IS NO WAY THAT *ALL* THAT POPULATION IS GOING TO GET ON THE BUS BRT! (to validate eliminating 2 vehicular lanes). Locally, Dundas St., east of the #427 Highway, is the *Eastern Gateway* to Mississauga. The current BRT plan will need to rename this part of Dundas St. the GRIDLOCK GATEWAY of MISSISSAUGA! People need to get engaged, or be 'caged'. IMO.

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Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 13:12

As part of the Dundas BRT project, the Project Team is planning for a corridor approximately 20 years from now. Mississauga is growing by leaps and bounds (population and employment), especially in the Dundas Street area; this growth must be accommodated within the vicinity of Dundas Street. As part of the Dundas Connects Master Plan, rigorous traffic studies took place to analyze how traffic will flow in the future. The Dundas BRT Project Team is also conducting traffic modeling and simulation exercises to ensure efficient traffic flow in this area. Some areas within the corridor are currently four lanes and will require widening for this project. The six-lane segment east of Dixie was widened to provide priority/capacity through high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes, and the Project Team is looking to increase this priority and capacity by reallocating lanes for transit-only and shifting these allocated lanes to the median.  

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Anonymous
Sep 21, 2021 - 19:07

As these busses would have to obey all the signal lights they would be barely faster in a dedicated lane than they would be if the busses are mixed in with normal traffic on Dundas within the Halton region. Given the impact of losing 2 lanes why not let the busses mix with the traffic which would save a lot of money on creating new infrastructure.

An alternative if speed is a priority to get the ridership up would have been an elevated structure, but that seems to not be an option at the moment. Which reinforces the first point that speed is not the priority.

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Metrolinx
Oct 7, 2021 - 12:58

Dundas BRT vehicles would need to obey traffic signals; however, dedicated BRT systems include priority signals within the BRT guideway. This allows higher travel speeds for buses within dedicated lanes – they will receive priority at some intersections and are able to pass through the traffic signal quicker.  

As part of this project, the Project Team is planning with climate change and sustainability goals built into the study. The solution to increasing traffic flow is not to keep widening, but to move more people, more efficiently, within the project footprint. This is why the project would see some existing lanes converted to dedicated transit lanes.  

The Dundas Connects Master Plan study considered a variety of technologies (LRT, BRT, elevated structures, etc.). These services and technologies were reviewed via transit ridership versus impacts and cost. It was determined that projected ridership did not warrant the high cost of an elevated structure.