> Yonge North Subway Extension LIVE - March 10, 2022 | Metrolinx Engage

Yonge North Subway Extension LIVE - March 10, 2022

Please join us on March 10, 2022 from 6:30pm to 8:30pm to ask your questions and learn about the Environmental Project Report (EPR) Addendum, focused on topics like noise and vibration, air quality, communities (socio-economic and land use), archaeology and heritage properties, soil and groundwater, and what we’ve heard from the community on the report so far. The EPR Addendum was released on February 10, 2022 and is open for public review and feedback until March 14, 2022.

Call-In With Your Question

As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we are adding a call-in option for tonight’s event. To ask your question by voice, join the Zoom meeting here. We aim to keep each question and subsequent answer to 3 minutes allowing for as many call-in questions as possible.

NOTE: please ensure you have the latest version of Zoom installed.

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Agenda

6:30: Meeting Begins/ Opening Remarks 

6:35: Environmental Project Report Addendum 

7:00: Questions and Answers 

8:30: Wrap up & Closing Remarks 

Meet the Speakers

Photo of Raj Khetarpal

Rajesh Khetarpal

Acting VP for Community Engagement – 905 Region

Photo of Stephen Collins

Stephen Collins

Program Sponsor for YNSE

Photo of Charlie Hoang

Charlie Hoang

Global Lead, Transit Architecture, Technical Advisor

Photo of Maria Z

Maria Zintchenko

Manager, Environmental Programs and Assessment

Photo of Kevin Coulter

Kevin Coulter

Senior Environmental Planner, Technical Advisor

Other Attendees:

  • Leona Hollingsworth, Director, Community Engagement – 905
  • Nick Faieta, Senior Manager, Community Engagement – York Region
  • Azim Ahmed, Manager, Community Engagement Yonge North Subway Extension 

  • Sam Kulendran, Engineer, Technical Advisor
  • Maria Doyle, Manager, Property Acquisitions

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar

How many residential homes will be affected by these "minor sounds and vibrations" and how many times per day will they experience this?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 6, 2022 - 14:11

The findings of the updated environmental studies show that by using the proven solutions available, noise and vibration levels from subway operations will be so faint in the Royal Orchard community that they’ll be very difficult to notice. By using modern subway technology available to us, levels of ground-borne vibration are predicted to be below 0.0.10 mm/s (millimetres per second), which is practically imperceptible to human senses. Ground-borne noise levels are predicted to be below 30dBA (weighted decibels are a unit of measurement that best reflects how sound is perceived by the human ear), which is comparable to an average whisper.

We will work with communities to ensure a comprehensive array of solutions are in place. As plans for the project are finalized, our design teams will have several tools to choose from to solve for noise and vibration while the extension is in service, including ‘floating slab’ track for the subway tunnels. This method has been proven to work on many subway lines around the world, including the recent western extension of TTC Line 1. It involves attaching the tracks to concrete slabs that ‘float’ above the subway tunnels on thick rubber pads that absorb vibration from passing trains. Near the train storage facility – where subway trains will be inspected, stored and cleaned while not in service – we can use noise barriers to block sounds coming from the existing railway corridor.

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Anonymous's avatar

There is a lot of vehicle traffic on Baythorn Drive with people going to and from work in the mornings and late afternoon, including cars and school busses dropping off and picking up their children at Baythorn Public School. What measures are being taken with regard to surface traffic, especially when the tunnel digging is being done, so that access and egress from the school and residences along Baythorn Drive (including those on Normark Crescent and Glamis Place) is not adversely impacted by the construction vehicles/equipment that will undoubtedly be blocking surface roads and impeding traffic flow. We have to be able to get out of our own neighbourhood safely and without undue delay. A similar scenario will be taking place on Kirk Drive when there is tunnelling being done near St. Anthony CES.

Please also comment on the impact on traffic flow, north and south, on the portions of Yonge Street that will be impacted when the digging is being done on that stretch of this major roadway.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 6, 2022 - 14:10

The tunnel boring machines will be assembled and lowered into the ground from the Langstaff Gateway area, south of Highway 407 and west of the CN Railway corridor. This area was selected because it is far away from homes and businesses and will limit the need for construction vehicles to travel through residential areas. The tunnel boring machines will remain underground until they reach just south of Cummer Avenue, where they will be removed and taken away.

 

We will be working on further project details through the detailed design phase. The traffic impacts are very specific to detailed design and construction staging, and we are continuing to refine those plans. Right now, it is too early to say what the specific localized impact and duration will be for traffic, but we will communicate that information as soon as plans are finalized.

 

To determine traffic management plans, we start with detailed modelling to look at the various options for construction staging to minimize disruption and analyze all elements of the transportation network before we move forward with recommendations. This analysis involves a thorough assessment, and we work very closely with the municipalities to get the necessary data to inform this work.

 

Communication is also an integral part of this work, and this project has a dedicated Community Engagement team that will be working with communities along the route throughout the project to communicate any traffic impacts. We will make sure communities get plenty of notice ahead of time using all available communications channels, and we’ll use clear and highly visible signage to make driving, cycling or walking around construction areas as easy as possible. These plans will be brought forward to future community liaison committees for discussion.

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Anonymous's avatar

How can you guarantee their success based only on predictions and modelling? Real world experience with floating slabs suggests they are not as successful as you maintain. Comparisons between York U and homes in the RO community are not apples to apples comparisons.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 6, 2022 - 14:12

The findings of the updated environmental studies show that by using the proven solutions available, noise and vibration levels from subway operations will be so faint in the Royal Orchard community that they’ll be very difficult to notice. By using modern subway technology available to us, levels of ground-borne vibration are predicted to be below 0.0.10 mm/s (millimetres per second), which is practically imperceptible to human senses. Ground-borne noise levels are predicted to be below 30dBA (weighted decibels are a unit of measurement that best reflects how sound is perceived by the human ear), which is comparable to an average whisper.

We will work with communities to ensure a comprehensive array of solutions are in place to address noise or vibration impacts and to ensure designs are sensitive and respectful of our neighbours.

As plans for the project are finalized, our design teams will have several tools to choose from to solve for noise and vibration while the extension is in service, including ‘floating slab’ track for the subway tunnels. This method has been proven to work on many subway lines around the world, including the recent western extension of TTC’s Line 1. It involves attaching the tracks to concrete slabs that ‘float’ above the subway tunnels on thick rubber pads that absorb vibration from passing trains. Near the train storage facility – where subway trains will be inspected, stored and cleaned while not in service – we can use noise barriers to block sounds coming from the existing railway corridor.

These are just two solutions in a wide array of proven technology available for the project, including resilient fasteners, ballast mats and devices called moveable point frogs that reduce the gap between rails that cross one another to help reduce noise and vibration from passing subway trains.

We will have more detailed information about the solutions we’ll be putting in place as further design work is refined.

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Anonymous's avatar

Why not just stay under Yonge entirely?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 6, 2022 - 14:13

Metrolinx refined the project plans from the original route to ensure the project can be built quickly and support regional growth plans while delivering the most possible benefits within the initial funding envelope of $5.6 billion. Our planners considered a range of factors to make the subway extension as easy as possible to access, for a wide number of people. 

 

Running the extension at ground level along the existing CN railway corridor means we can finish the project sooner and reduces the need for complex, time-consuming, and costly construction of tunnels and underground stations. It also means we limit the need for large, disruptive excavation sites for underground stations and exit buildings. This allows us to limit our property needs in areas of the surface-level segment of the route. Limiting construction work to areas that are more out of the way will also cut down on disruptions of hydro, natural gas, and water service as we bring you more transit.

 

This approach means we can include more stations along the subway extension, providing more congestion relief to existing transit lines and roadways. If we were to follow the original route, Metrolinx would only be able to build three stations.

If you’d like to learn more on the route, I encourage you to check out  past virtual open houses from Dec. 16, 2021 and Jan. 5, 2022 that discuss the adjusted route in detail.

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