> Yonge North Subway Extension LIVE - January 5, 2022 | Metrolinx Engage

Yonge North Subway Extension LIVE - January 5, 2022

On January 5, 2022, Metrolinx hosted a presentation and live question-and-answer session with members of the Yonge North Subway Extension project team to share information about refinements made to the northern segment of the route and progress being made on the project, including plans for early works at Finch Station. The panel of Metrolinx experts answered the top-voted questions submitted by participants through our interactive online platform. The panel also took questions from community members who called in to the meeting. The topics included the adjusted alignment, Transit Action Ontario’s route proposal and Metrolinx’s analysis, and updates on our upcoming community office and sound demonstrations.

If you weren’t able to join us, the video recording is available below for you to watch any time.

 

Call-In With Your Question

As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we are adding a call-in option for tonight’s event. To ask your question by voice, join the Zoom meeting here. We aim to keep each question and subsequent answer to 3 minutes allowing for as many call-in questions as possible.

NOTE: please ensure you have the latest version of Zoom installed.

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Agenda

6:30: Meeting Begins/ Opening Remarks  

6:35: Yonge north Subway Extension Project Update 

7:00: Questions and Answers 

8:00: Wrap up & Closing Remarks 

Presentation Materials

Virtual Open House – January 5, 2022 Outstanding Questions

In defence of having 2 stations at the north end Stephen Collins stated that they serve 2 separate functions: High Tech as a terminal station and Bridge as a transit hub. But today we have Kipling Station on Line 2 which is both. It still doesn’t make sense to have 2 stations 300m apart.

Bridge and High Tech stations will support York Region’s growth plans for the Langstaff Gateway and Richmond Hill Centre urban grow centres, which have been in place for many years in response to the demand for housing and employment opportunities in the region. Since those areas are expected to grow significantly in the years to come, these stations will help make sure any growth is sustainable by contributing a large portion of the riders that will use the subway extension.

Located between Highway 7 and Highway 407, Bridge Station will create vital connections between the subway and the Richmond Hill GO line, as well as GO bus, Viva Bus Rapid Transit and local bus services that run along the two major highways. It’s also worth noting that the station at High Tech Road would put the subway within walking distance for more than half of the residents expected to live in the Richmond Hill Centre area by 2041.

When will Metrolinx provide a DETAILED map of the project to see the homes effected, the city property effected and schools.

As part of the next phase of planning and design, we are preparing an addendum to the existing Environmental Project Report , which will include further detail on the precise route of the subway extension and station area footprints. We will keep the neighbourhood fully informed as project details are confirmed.

We will make sure that future subway service will be unobtrusive and difficult to notice, ensuring communities will be peaceful and quiet when the subway is in service. Our aim is to make sure there are no significant differences between levels of noise and vibration experienced in Royal Orchard today and what those levels will be when the extension is in service.

Has CN Rail approved the subway under their tracks?

We are in discussions with CN about our plans for the Yonge North Subway Extension as planning and design for the project continues. Metrolinx has a longstanding relationship with CN – we share rail corridor throughout our existing GO network and have done so for years. We’re confident we will be able to effectively work together to move this important project forward.

As it was mentioned in the previous meetings, the option for tunneling under the cemetery instead of residential properties will be considered. Can you update us regarding this, and progress for this consideration? Can you clearly mention why tunneling under the cemetery was not considered as one of the options in the first proposals?

Our goal when we plan and design large projects like this is to minimize impacts as much as possible, and there are unique challenges we face no matter where we build. Through our analysis, we found that running the subway tunnels below Holy Cross Cemetery would have made it necessary to relocate hundreds of burial sites since the tunnels would not be deep enough in this area. This could have affected thousands of people and added significantly to project timelines because we would need to identify, locate and get in touch with any next of kin to notify them of our plans before any burials are moved. With those issues in mind, planning and design teams advanced the analysis of the northern section of the route immediately after the Initial Business Case (IBC) was drafted and submitted for endorsement by the Metrolinx Board. The refined route proposal presented alongside the IBC is the recommended path forward, and will be analyzed further in the Preliminary Design Business Case, which will guide the next phase of the project.

Do the right thing and put it back on Yonge Street as originally planned. And no I do not want to listen to Mr. Collins drone on with his business plan explanation. This is about developers wishes and to ---- with us commoners !

The approach we’re taking will help people all over York Region because it means we can include more stations along the subway extension, providing more congestion relief to existing transit lines and roadways. Running the subway along the CN rail corridor in the northern end of the extension will create better, faster connections with GO trains and bus rapid transit services in an area that is poised for growth.

The tunnels along the Yonge North Subway Extension will be built to strict design and engineering standards and will be much deeper underground than in many areas of Toronto’s existing subway network. The bottoms of the tunnels – where trains pass over the tracks – will be at least 20 metres deep in the Royal Orchard community – roughly as deep as a six-storey building is tall. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago.

We are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans.

Revisiting the rejection of Transport Action Ontario’s option1. You’ve modified the relatively smooth route of option1 into a northern version of your own adjusted route with its awkward tight curves. Both of these options would lead to slower speeds and squealy-wheelies. What’s really wrong with tunnelling under the Langstaff lands, or better yet, starting to curve off Yonge at the southern edge of Holy Cross?

We studied this proposal from every angle, but in the end we concluded the proposal is not an improvement over our current plans because of significant cost increases that would limit our ability to include important benefits in the project, like a fourth station and the potential for additional stations.

We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway

Does the recent revised route mean the train emerges above ground at a different spot or same?

The current alignment announced will have the subway trains emerge above ground South of Langstaff Road East, North of Holy Cross Cemetery along the existing CN rail tracks. Once the subway trains emerge above ground, it will remain above grade to the final two stations (Bridge Station and High Tech Station).

Why is Metrolinx continuing to spin Option 3? Naming the the revised route the Green Alignment implies that it’s now environmentally friendly. This suggests that MX knew that the original route wasn’t. Why not? The revised Green Alignment still isn’t green.

The Yonge North Subway Extension uses innovative solutions to ensure the project can be built quickly and serve key growth areas while delivering the most possible benefits within the initial funding envelope of $5.6 billion. Our planners considered a range of factors to make the Yonge North Subway Extension as easy as possible to access, for a wide number of people.

Running the adjusted route along the existing CN railway corridor in the northern end of the route allows us to build a fourth station within the $5.6 billion funding envelope because it minimizes the amount of tunneling needed.

This approach will also help us bring better rapid transit service to the many people who will live in the Richmond Hill Centre and Langstaff Gateway areas in the coming years, since they are designated as urban growth centres and the existing CN rail line runs through the centre of them. This location also fills the gap in the regional transit network by connecting the subway with the GO and viva Bus Rapid Transit networks, unlocking more travel opportunities across the region.

Why did you change the name from Option 3 to Green Alignment? Please explain in detail.

In the YNSE Initial Business Case 3 Options were studied. For visual purposes each route was drawn on a map with a different colour (Blue, Magenta, light blue). The adjusted route announced in December was drawn with colour green.

Has it been considered for the extension to rise to the surface north-east of Steeles and follow the CN rail corridor east until it reaches the Richmond Hill GO corridor, following it up to High Tech station? This route would require 3.5 km less tunnelling, saving over $1 billion, and John-Bayview is more prone for densification compared to Centre.

The Yonge North Subway Extension has been designed to support vibrant urban development along the route that creates faster, easier connections to rapid transit so that people can get out from behind the wheel. The CN rail corridor is about 3km east of Yonge and Steeles intersection. Aside from the cost and complications of tunneling to reach the CN rail corridor in this area, this alignment would not offer the same transit benefits as the reference alignment does since the further east we divert, the travel time from Richmond Hill would increase. This alignment would also mainly pass though the low residential density where there are limited development opportunities and growth anticipated. Also, Clark Station would not be possible in this alignment and the potential Royal Orchard Station would not be located in the same location.

Why not under the Cemetery. I am re-visiting the alignment beneath the cemetery. Since the Building Transit Faster Act apparently allows the province to do what it wants, why does Option 3 not simply go beneath the cemetery to get to your precious Bridge station above grade? It's the most direct route with far less of a turn to the east and then back to the north?

Our goal when we plan and design large projects like this is to minimize impacts as much as possible, and there are unique challenges we face no matter where we build. Through our analysis, we found that running the subway tunnels below Holy Cross Cemetery would have made it necessary to relocate hundreds of burial sites since the tunnels would not be deep enough in this area. This could have affected thousands of people and added significantly to project timelines because we would need to identify, locate and get in touch with any next of kin to notify them of our plans before any burials are moved. With those issues in mind, planning and design teams advanced the analysis of the northern section of the route immediately after the Initial Business Case (IBC) was drafted and submitted for endorsement by the Metrolinx Board. The refined route proposal presented alongside the IBC is the recommended path forward, and will be analyzed further in the Preliminary Design Business Case, which will guide the next phase of the project.

We are confident that we can effectively manage any project impacts through robust planning, design work and community consultations. We expect to have more detailed information in the coming months as further design work is refined and we move forward with environmental assessments, but our goal will be to minimize impacts to communities as much as possible as we deliver major transit benefits to them.

We’re going to be using noise and vibration solutions that have been proven to work on modern subway lines all over the world, including the extension of the western leg of Toronto’s Line 1 subway. Our designs will be based on up-to-date industry standards, which have significantly improved since the first subway lines in the GTA were built many decades ago.

Our early studies show that by using available, proven technology, vibration levels are predicted to be below what humans can feel. We estimate that noise levels will be nearly imperceptible, about as quiet as the average whisper or rustling leaves in the distance.

We are determined to make the project the best possible fit for the communities it will serve. We’ll continue to work closely with our regional and municipal partners as we advance our plans and we’re committed to sharing the latest updates of our plans with the community.

Why are you running the subway under houses rather than Yong st? I’ve recently purchased a property at Bay Thorn Dr and there has been couple of options for subway line but neither was under Bay Thorn and all of a sudden you’ve decided to run the line under it. Please explain what makes you believe that this is a better option? Because you are dealing with less people/houses so they can’t do anything about it?

We have recently introduced updates to the project that will result in deeper tunnels and a route that travels under significantly fewer residential properties in the Royal Orchard community compared to our early plans. We made those refinements in response to the feedback we’ve heard through engaging with municipalities and consulting with communities across York Region and Toronto over the past eight months.

We have looked at all the options to avoid tunneling under Royal Orchard and none of those give better transit benefits. Given that we can reduce noise and vibration from subway service to a nearly imperceptible level, tunneling under Royal Orchard is the best transit solution.

In addition to the various route options we looked at in our initial business case analysis, we recently completed a further detailed review of a proposal from the community for an alternative route that would stay along Yonge Street before curving to travel along the northern boundary of Holy Cross Cemetery towards the railway corridor.

Given that we can reduce noise and vibration from subway service to a nearly imperceptible level, tunneling under Royal Orchard is the best transit solution.

Will you make the analysis of revised proposal #2 public? How can we trust the blanket statement that revised option #2 is inferior to the new Green Alignment without supporting details? How do we know that all relevant factors were taken into consideration?

Metrolinx conducted an extensive analysis of Option 2 in the IBC, available here. We have looked at all the options to avoid tunneling under Royal Orchard and none of those give better transit benefits. Given that we can reduce noise and vibration from subway service to a nearly imperceptible level, tunneling under Royal Orchard is the best transit solution.

In addition to the various route options we looked at in our initial business case analysis, we recently completed a further detailed review of a proposal from the community for an alternative route that would stay along Yonge Street before curving to travel along the northern boundary of Holy Cross Cemetery towards the railway corridor.

We studied this proposal from every angle but in the end, we were faced with three major obstacles that led us to conclude the proposal is not an improvement over our current plans:

Significant cost increases: If we adopt the proposal from the community, significant cost increases would be required and will also reduce the local development opportunities.

Complex construction: The proposal from the community keeps Bridge Station in the same vital location but places it partially underground, which would make the station more complex and more costly. It would require reinforcing the foundation of the Highway 407 and Highway 7 bridges, and tunneling under the existing culvert that supports Pomona Creek.

Technical constraints from tighter turns, steeper inclines and slower train speeds:In order to reach the existing railway corridor, the subway tracks would need to be curved much tighter than the current TTC standards, which would mean trains will have to travel along those parts at slower speeds, with longer travel times for riders. This proposal from the community would also hinder the ability of the Langstaff Gateway urban growth centre to realize longstanding regional and municipal growth objectives because the proposal essentially splits the development into two parts and would place development restrictions on the envisioned growth.

Please explain why Option 3 is the best transit plan. Option 3 does not provide the best transportation solution for the existing residents of York Region in general. The needs of the current population are being compromised to provide the maximum benefit to the developers and future residents of a community that won’t be built out for 20 to 30 years.

Our plans focus on both future development and also on the people who live in these communities today. York Region has been planning for this growth for many years in response to the demand for more housing and employment opportunities in these communities. We are supporting those plans.

The Yonge North Subway Extension will enable 26,000 more residents and 22,900 more jobs to be within a 10-minute walk of a new station within the next two decades. This ensures that any growth is sustainable, because reliable rapid transit with convenient connections to the regional transportation network is the foundation for growth. It gives new and current residents the means to move and give them more options to move around with more choices and more opportunities.

When is Metrolinx going to be honest with people? A decision has been made regarding thee routing of the subway. When will Metrolinx be honest and simply tell people that we have no say in the matter and if we do not agree to Metrolinx terms the land required will be expropriated?

We recognize how important your property is to you and we are committed to providing clear, accurate information as soon as possible. If Metrolinx confirms that your property is needed, you will receive written notification directly from us. Our commitment is to ensure that owners and tenants do not experience a financial loss.

Metrolinx may need to acquire some property underground to build the tunnels and support future subway service. Sometimes an entire property is needed, and sometimes just part of it is needed; some property needs are temporary to support construction, and others are permanent to support new infrastructure. Subsurface easements allow for the use of space under the ground, below homes.

In any case, we will compensate owners with fair market value for any property that is needed. It’s important to note that Metrolinx compensates property owners even when the infrastructure we are building is deep underground and no space is occupied at surface level.

Why isn't the option of using cut and cover or building elevated not being considered? The alignment passes over a wide stretch of yonge street which can easily accommodate an elevated or cut and cover section. Speeding up construction, lowering costs, and allowing addition stations to be built which currently don't fit the budget.

Modern tunneling technology has been proven around the world to be an efficient way to build underground subways. The subway extension to Vaughan was recently completed using tunnel boring machines for most of the route. Tunneling allows the subway to be built deeper below the surface, which is not practical with cut-and-cover methods. Being able to build the subway deeper underground means there will be no direct impacts to the homes, buildings and roads at the surface. Subway stations are typically built using cut-and-cover methods because they are significantly larger and have entrances that need to be built at surface level.

What exactly would be required (i.e. in terms of financial resources and additional time) to restore plans for the previous routing which was identified by the original EA? And since Metrolinx has the best interests of the Royal Orchard neighbourhood in mind, why are we not hearing about your efforts in advocating for such a change in plans?

We have recently introduced updates to the project that will result in deeper tunnels and a route that travels under significantly fewer residential properties in the Royal Orchard community compared to our early plans. We made those refinements in response to the feedback we’ve heard through engaging with municipalities and consulting with communities across York Region and Toronto over the past eight months.

This approach will maximize the subway connectivity to other modes of transit such as buses and GO transit, while also optimizing the urban and city building developments at and around Richmond Hill.

Which level of government, provincial, federal, regional (York), local (markham) have approved this option and who were the people who have signed off on this option for each level who have reviewed it. Can these project approval documents be reviewed for each government authority.

Final decisions on project scope, including the route of the subway extension and station locations, will be made by the Province of Ontario, in consultation with government partners. These decisions will be informed by updated environmental studies, feedback from communities, and detailed technical work done by Metrolinx.

Who has the final approval on this project? Is it the City of Markham or the Provincial Government? If the Provincial Govt. approves the project and City of Markham rejects the current plan who has the final say?

Final decisions on project scope, including the route of the subway extension and station locations, will be made by the Province of Ontario, in consultation with government partners. These decisions will be informed by updated environmental studies, feedback from communities, and detailed technical work done by Metrolinx.

What is the probability of adding one more station? We know that Cummer and Royal Orchard Stations may or may not be built depending on funding. It was stated that Metrolinx is working to find funding options. My question is, what do those discussions involve? Are there any specific details that can be provided? What is the probability that we will see one of them get built, and which one if so?

We are working with the Province and York Region to determine the feasibility of a station in the Royal Orchard community.

The scope of the Gateway development is enormous. It should be obvious to a world class designer, that a proper underground Bridge station is necessary for rider experience and weather. This would give you a real Bridge station, and us the Yonge route. With developer funds available, why are you continuing with option 3, and adding other stations.

Metrolinx refined the project plans to deliver more transit benefits for the people of York Region and Toronto, while staying within budget. This change to the project is what is outlined in the Initial Business Case (IBC) and addendum that were published in March 2021. One of the most significant refinements is the updated route, which places the northern section of the extension at surface level along the existing CN railway corridor, instead of tunneling all the way to Richmond Hill. The updated route curves away from Yonge Street and runs underground to the proposed subway tunnel portal south of Langstaff Road.

The benefit of Bridge Station as it is proposed in Option 3 is that it brings together as many as six existing and future regional transit services in a location that is easier for the buses that run along those routes to access than where the transit hub is located in Option 1 and Option 2. Having stations above ground cuts down on travel time by avoiding lengthy descents into underground tunnels and will make transferring from the subway to a GO train, GO bus, or local bus faster and easier.

Has Metrolinx indeed dismissed options one and two in favour of option three? Is there no option to change your minds?

Options 1 and 2 have already been evaluated through our business case process. The adjusted route makes it possible to build a fourth station by running the subway along the existing CN railway corridor in the northern end of the route, which reduces the need for complex and costly construction of tunnels, and offers the most benefits possible within the available funding envelope. Building the subway at surface level along the existing railway also cuts down on travel time by avoiding lengthy descents into underground tunnels and will make transferring from the subway to transit connections faster and easier. We will also be able to complete the project sooner than if the subway was tunneled the entire length of the route and protect for a future potential northern extension of the subway by better utilizing the existing railway transportation corridor.

Why haven't you been able to show our MPP the numbers.

We use the data from our business case to ensure we make decisions that maximize benefits and control costs throughout the full course of a project. Yonge North Subway Extension Initial Business Case could be found here.

Where will the bus terminal at Steeles and Clerk stations be located? How large will they be? Will they be at grade or underground?

The design concept and requirements for the bus terminals are being refined based on the needs identified by the TTC, York Region Transit, and other local stakeholders. We are seeking input from our partners and will share more details about the footprint and design of bus terminals when the Preliminary Design Business Case is finalized.

Leitchcroft and Times Ave neighborhood of 10,000 people is a very short bike ride to the new subway stations but there are currently no safe AAA bike paths to get there. What are the plans?

The next stage in planning for the Yonge North Subway Extension includes the release of the Preliminary Design Business Case (PDBC), which will further refine the project's design, route, and benefits.

When can we expect to see the data and analysis and/or the updated environmental assessment that is necessary to address the concerns of the neighbourhood and commenting agencies. Without this, Option 3 or variations has no legal standing as it is not an approved route

Community input is vital to our work because it can help uncover insights we might not have anticipated. That feedback helps us refine our plans based on what we hear from communities, pending further analysis and review by our planning and design teams.

We’ve already started to collect your input through the virtual open house events we’ve been hosting. We’ll also be reaching out for feedback from the community as we prepare an updated environmental assessment for the project. All of the input we collect from the public and Indigenous communities, as well as any actions we take as a result of that feedback, will be documented in a draft report that is expected to be published later this month.

The data and analysis we’ve finalized so far is available through the Initial Business Case and supplementary analysis for the project. We are preparing an addendum to the existing environmental assessment (EA) that will cover off any changes to existing conditions since that EA was completed and evaluate the updated route. This will build off the work done on previous environmental studies and will involve studying things like noise and vibration, soil and groundwater quality, the natural environment, and land use. We expect to issue a draft environmental report in the months to come. We’ll also keep be reaching out to the community to gather input and insights that will support our work and help us deliver the best project possible

What are the durations of the RFQ, RFP and Construction periods?

We expect to issue a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for teams interested in building the subway tunnels in the coming months, which will be followed by a Request for Proposals (RFP). The Yonge North Subway Extension is expected to be operational by 2029/30.

When is the RFQ to be advertised?

We expect to issue a Request for Qualifications (RFQ) for teams interested in building the subway tunnels in the coming months, which will be followed by a Request for Proposals (RFP). The Yonge North Subway Extension is expected to be operational by 2029/30.

Based on our previous experiences, does anyone REALLY believe the timeline and cost estimates? We know better about what will really happen, right? Thank you

Metrolinx is committed to guiding this project efficiently and cost-effectively so that it can be completed on time and on budget. Lessons learned from past projects will be used to guide the decisions we make, and we will take steps along the way to reduce the risk of delays or cost overruns.

The planned date to begin the main construction on the project is 2023. We will have more information about construction timelines as we progress through the next phase of planning and design, but we remain committed to an in-service date of 2029-2030, after the Ontario Line is in service.

When is construction starting? I support the underground subway. When will it start?

The planned date to begin the main construction on the project is 2023. We will have more information about construction timelines as we progress through the next phase of planning and design, but we remain committed to an in-service date of 2029-2030, after the Ontario Line is in service.

What is the expected timeline of the project? What is the planned completion date for the last subway station (at Yonge and 7)?

The planned date to begin the main construction on the project is 2023. We will have more information about construction timelines as we progress through the next phase of planning and design, but we remain committed to an in-service date of 2029-2030, after the Ontario Line is in service.

Please provided a break down of where the money is coming from to fund this project. Federal, Provincial, Regional etc. Most importantly, please also share how much money are the developers of the new builds at high tech and bridge contributing to the subway development.

Please provided a break down of where the money is coming from to fund this project. Federal, Provincial, Regional etc. Most importantly, please also share how much money are the developers of the new builds at high tech and bridge contributing to the subway development.

Metrolinx and Infrastructure Ontario are moving the project forward under the Subway Program, which includes three other rapid transit expansions that will get the region moving — the Ontario Line, the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension, and the Scarborough Subway Extension.

The provincial government has committed almost $17 billion toward the Subways Program, as a whole.

York Region has pledged to contribute proportional funding to the capital construction costs of the project through a preliminary agreement with the provincial government. The final contribution from the region will be subject to further refinements to the project’s budget and scope.

The federal government has committed $10.4 billion to Ontario’s four priority subway projects, including the Yonge North Subway Extension.

The provincial government will explore development opportunities that could support the project through the Transit-Oriented Communities program as part of the planning process. Any decisions we make on the route of the extension and station locations are in the interest of improving the customer experience, increasing access to transit, maximizing ridership, achieving travel time savings, and creating better access to jobs. These criteria are balanced by cost and other community considerations.

We want to know which homes are impacted including those that are affected on their easements (city property) what is the total amount of homes in the transit land corridor. If the subway tunnels under the front of my home but on city property it still affects my home value… will I get compensation?

We recognize how important your property is to you and we are committed to providing clear, accurate information as soon as possible. If Metrolinx confirms that your property is needed, you will receive written notification directly from us.

After that, Metrolinx will arrange to meet with the property owner to answer any questions they may have, including how much property is needed and why, how the acquisition process works, and expected timelines. Multiple meetings will take place throughout the property acquisition process to ensure the property owner has the information and support they need.

Our approach to compensation for subsurface rights under a property is treated the same way as if we were taking a portion of a front or back lawn. That property has value and will be compensated for that value. Our property team will work closely with residents on developing a valuation and compensating residents accordingly. Our preferred approach is through amicable negotiations and settlement and we would only start an expropriation process to protect project timelines. It is important to note, that although we know noise and vibration will be nearly imperceptible, we are compensating residents for the value of the land we are acquiring.

Our house is over 50 yrs old. We are seniors and this is our forever home. What effect will boring have on the stability of our home and what level of noise and vibration can we expected and for how long?

We will make sure that future subway service will be unobtrusive and difficult to notice, ensuring communities will be peaceful and quiet when the subway is in service. Our aim is to make sure there are no significant differences between levels of noise and vibration experienced in Royal Orchard today and what those levels will be when the extension is in service.

We now have access to a wide range of solutions to address noise and vibration that simply were not available decades ago, when most of the GTA’s existing subway lines were built. We will use modern solutions that are tested and proven across the globe and recently in Toronto to extend the western leg of Line 1 to Vaughan.

In fact, based on what we have observed inside buildings that sit above the tunnels and the conditions we’ve studied in Royal Orchard, we know the sounds and vibrations from subway trains traveling in the Yonge North Subway Extension’s tunnels will be very difficult to hear and feel. We will do everything practicable to make sure people who live along the subway extension barely notice it.

The tunnels will be surrounded by thick reinforced concrete and will be built to strict design and engineering standards. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

Now you have informed us of the project travelling under our homes, you can advise us on what we need to do to protect our homes/properties from potential noise/vibrations/damage. You said you have experts so you should be able to give us advise on what should/can we do to protect our buildings above the planned project part for preventative care.

We will make sure that future subway service will be unobtrusive and difficult to notice, ensuring communities will be peaceful and quiet when the subway is in service. Our aim is to make sure there are no significant differences between levels of noise and vibration experienced in Royal Orchard today and what those levels will be when the extension is in service.

We now have access to a wide range of solutions to address noise and vibration that simply were not available decades ago, when most of the GTA’s existing subway lines were built. We will use modern solutions that are tested and proven across the globe and recently in Toronto to extend the western leg of Line 1 to Vaughan.

The tunnels will be surrounded by thick reinforced concrete and will be built to strict design and engineering standards. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

To build the tunnels for the subway extension, Metrolinx will use state-of-the-art tunnel boring machines that carefully chew through and remove soil and rock. The Yonge North Subway Extension will use innovative technology that will help the machines adapt to different soil conditions when tunnelling. These specialized tunnel boring machines will minimize any surface settlement and protect properties along the tunnel alignment.

Metrolinx is committed to minimizing and managing construction impacts to you and your property. Before construction starts, we provide pre-construction surveys. A pre-condition survey is a non-invasive assessment of the exterior of your property completed prior to the start of our construction. This survey is an industry standard used to set baseline conditions of properties located in close vicinity to a construction site. Participation is completely voluntary and the service is paid for by Metrolinx.

Now that Metrolinx has informed residents of the project travelling under homes and properties, you can surely advise us on what we need to do to protect our properties from potential noise/vibrations/damage ( during construction and during the operations of the trains).

We will make sure that future subway service will be unobtrusive and difficult to notice, ensuring communities will be peaceful and quiet when the subway is in service. Our aim is to make sure there are no significant differences between levels of noise and vibration experienced in Royal Orchard today and what those levels will be when the extension is in service.

We now have access to a wide range of solutions to address noise and vibration that simply were not available decades ago, when most of the GTA’s existing subway lines were built. We will use modern solutions that are tested and proven across the globe and recently in Toronto to extend the western leg of Line 1 to Vaughan.

The tunnels will be surrounded by thick reinforced concrete and will be built to strict design and engineering standards. We’re confident that high-quality, modern tunnels built to the latest industry standards will ensure future subway services won’t be a disruption for the community.

To build the tunnels for the subway extension, Metrolinx will use state-of-the-art tunnel boring machines that carefully chew through and remove soil and rock. The Yonge North Subway Extension will use innovative technology that will help the machines adapt to different soil conditions when tunnelling. These specialized tunnel boring machines will minimize any surface settlement and protect properties along the tunnel alignment.

Metrolinx is committed to minimizing and managing construction impacts to you and your property. Before construction starts, we provide pre-construction surveys. A pre-condition survey is a non-invasive assessment of the exterior of your property completed prior to the start of our construction. This survey is an industry standard used to set baseline conditions of properties located in close vicinity to a construction site. Participation is completely voluntary and the service is paid for by Metrolinx.

Tunneling through bedrock now? Aren't there many, many possible unforeseen challenges of boring through bedrock under a condo building? Time, complexity, the unknown costs more. How have you budgeted for that?

One of the key decision driver to deepen the alignment into the bedrock in RO area is to minimize the impact to the community and maximize tunnel construction and operation safety of the subway without compromising ridership safety and comfort. While mining through bedrock does have its own set of challenges, our team has conducted thorough analysis and investigation coupled with reviews of past subway projects in the Toronto area and around the world to ensure equipment used and methodologies will meet the safety standards and constructability.

Modern tunneling technology has been proven around the world to be an efficient way to build underground subways. The subway extension to Vaughan was recently completed using tunnel boring machines for most of the route. Tunneling allows the subway to be built deeper below the surface, which is not practical with cut-and-cover methods. Being able to build the subway deeper underground means there will be no direct impacts to the homes, buildings and roads at the surface. Subway stations are typically built using cut-and-cover methods because they are significantly larger and have entrances that need to be built at surface level.

To build the tunnels for the subway extension, Metrolinx will use state-of-the-art tunnel boring machines that carefully chew through and remove soil and rock. The Yonge North Subway Extension will use innovative technology that will help the machines adapt to different soil conditions when tunnelling. These specialized tunnel boring machines will minimize any surface settlement and protect properties along the tunnel alignment.

The letter of Dec 8 states that the depth ranges anywhere between 21 meters and 50 meters. Inform the affected homes what is the expected depth under each home as per your current plan. Not only the depth of the track from the floor of our basement (foundation) but also the depth of the top of the tunnel under the floor of the basement (foundation)

We have recently introduced updates to the project that will result in deeper tunnels and a route that travels under significantly fewer residential properties in the Royal Orchard community compared to our early plans. We made those refinements in response to the feedback we’ve heard through engaging with municipalities and consulting with communities across York Region and Toronto over the past eight months.

We will implement a range of practical, modern railway technological solutions to address noise and vibration. These solutions were not available decades ago when most of the Greater Toronto Area’s existing subway lines were built. These new solutions have been tested around the world, and recently, in Toronto to extend the western leg of Line 1 to Vaughan.

Metrolinx will enter into direct, one-on-one discussions with each homeowner that will have the subway run under their property. Through those discussions, Metrolinx will work with owners to procure an independent valuation, at our cost, of the property interest and make an offer accordingly.

The Metrolinx letter of Dec8 sates that the depth ranges anywhere between 21 to 50 meters. Residents want to know what is the expected depth under each home as per your current plans? And not only the depth of the track from the floor of our basement (foundation) but also what is the depth of the top of the tunnel under the floor of the basement.

In the shallowest section of tunnels that will run below single-family homes and a local school, our current designs have the bottoms of the tunnels at a minimum depth of 21metres (19.5 metres to where the train wheels interact with the tracks).

What is the expected value of the DBF Tunnels project?

A public-private partnership (sometimes referred to as a P3) is an approach for financing and building large public infrastructure projects.

A group of companies – including contractors, equipment suppliers and investors come together under this model to deliver a project more efficiently than traditional procurement.

Partnering with the private sector keeps costs in check by transferring risk to the partner with the experience and expertise to best handle that risk.

Even low levels of noise and vibration can cause physical, emotional and especially, in children, neurological consequences. Your routing goes right under an elementary school at shallow levels. Have you factored in future treatment costs if your assumptions of mitigation were wrong. Winters Residence at York U tenants hear & feel every train.

We would never move ahead with a design that isn’t safe for our neighbours, our customers and our employees. The detailed studies and all the consultations we’re doing right now will help us make sure we put all the right noise and vibration solutions in place so there are no significant differences between what’s experienced in the Royal Orchard community today and what will be experienced when the extension is in service. We want to make sure the neighbourhoods we serve will stay peaceful and quiet, and remain sought-after places to live in.

We’re looking at a wide array of proven noise and vibration solutions for the project, including resilient fasteners, floating slab and ballast mats to help cushion the tracks and reduce noise and vibration. Rail dampers can also be used to help reduce the noise from passing trains. These types of solutions have been used around the world, including on the recently completed Toronto-York Spadina Subway Extension.

Metrolinx uses provincial guidelines to monitor and assess the noise and vibration associated with the operation of new transit lines, as well as facilities that support them like bus terminals, station entrance buildings, and train storage facilities.

Metrolinx has also adopted the vibration standards from the Federal Transit Administration in the United States. These standards are used extensively throughout the US and Canada for transit projects. If noise and vibration levels are predicted to exceed these guidelines while the extension is in service, a wide array of solutions are available for Metrolinx to include in the design of the project to limit those impacts.

You have stated that the tunneling will start at the north end. Why wouldn't you start at Finch and work north? Logically that makes more sense, so that it's easier to accommodate changes in assumptions based on how things actually develop. For example, there may be some major event such that it would make sense to stop at Steeles.

Metrolinx is working with our regional and municipal partners to understand the unique local considerations that could impact how the Yonge North Subway Extension is delivered. For example, any infrastructure that will be operated or maintained by our partners will be designed to comply with their regulations and standards. The strategic objectives within municipal and regional growth plans are also included in our business case analysis and will inform our decisions as the design and planning process makes its way to the next stage.

How will traffic be controlled on Hendon? We live at Kensington Ave., three streets west of finch and hendon. Traffic is fairly bad and loud on Hendon and there are many families who avail of the facilities at Hendon Park. What measures will you take to address traffic and pedestrian safety on Hendon? Will there be cross walks, widening of Hendon street?

The westbound lane of Hendon Avenue will need to be closed from the intersection of Yonge Street and Hendon for about six to eight months, starting in early 2023. We’re working closely with the City of Toronto to develop a plan to keep traffic moving safely and efficiently – whether you get around by car, on transit, on a bicycle or on foot. We’ll also put up temporary traffic signals, signage and wayfinding information to help people easily navigate any closures due to construction. Our plan will consider factors like; how people will access local businesses quickly and easily; and how to minimize impacts on TTC, York Region Transit and GO services.

Will there be a cross walk added at Hendon & Beecroft? Hendon street is already very crowded and the extension will likely result in increased traffic. The current 4 way stop sign at Beecroft and Hendon needs to be replaced by a traffic light ir crosswalk for pedestrian safety.

We will be working with the our municipal and regional partners to develop a plan that will keep pedestrian and vehicle traffic moving and make sure people can get where they need to go easily while construction is happening. Our plan considers factors like; how people will access local businesses quickly and easily; and how to minimize impacts on TTC, York Region Transit and GO services. Potential traffic impacts are being studied through an updated environmental assessment. We expect to release a draft report on the findings early next year.

The City council held an emergency virtual meeting in Dec. Why are you bypassing and throwing away all of the city plans for Markham? Why is a developer or infracstructure company the name and face of the Bridge and High Tech developments? Who elected them? How do they benefit from the designation of of TOC or an MZO?

Infrastructure Ontario is leading the Transit-Oriented Communities program, with the aim of creating vibrant, sustainable, mixed-use sites that will bring more housing, jobs, and community amenities within walking distance of reliable, fast and efficient transit. Infrastructure Ontario is best positioned to answer questions about that program, and they can be reached at [email protected]. We have reached out to them to ensure they are aware of these questions and prepared to respond.

Are MZO's coming? Since no one at the province answers the taxpayer (Premier or Minister of Transportation) maybe you can tell us - are your planned TOC going to be turned into MZO's?

Infrastructure Ontario is leading the Transit-Oriented Communities program, with the aim of creating vibrant, sustainable, mixed-use sites that will bring more housing, jobs, and community amenities within walking distance of reliable, fast and efficient transit. Infrastructure Ontario is best positioned to answer questions about that program, and they can be reached at [email protected]. We have reached out to them to ensure they are aware of these questions and prepared to respond.

How many tracks will there be north of high tech? for how long? and store how many trains?

We are in the early stages of planning and design for the surface-level train storage facility and working with our partners at the TTC to better understand what is needed to support operation of the subway extension. The train storage facility would include new tracks within the railway corridor that would store a total of 15 subway train cars.

Please provide us with the template letter that you will use when you inform the residents of perpetual or temporary sub surface acquisition with TERMS and CONDITIONS not the compensation. You have this already. Please send this immediately to affected people.

Our approach to compensation for subsurface rights under a property is treated the same way as if we were taking a portion of a front or back lawn. That property has value and will be compensated for that value. Our property team will work closely with residents on developing a valuation, at our cost, and compensating residents accordingly. Metrolinx will enter into direct, one-on-one discussions with each homeowner that will have the subway run under their property.

Please provide us with a complete list of questions and answers to date as a PDF. A web version is not enough as that is not AODA compliant under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005.

Metrolinx is committed to ensuring that its services and operations are accessible to all customers and to working with partners in the GTHA to plan, build and operate an integrated accessible transportation system. The organization will work diligently to remove existing, and avoid creating, barriers to universal access and will demonstrate leadership, consulting widely and incorporating best practices to enhance accessibility in its services.

Please reach out to our dedicated team for any specific requests. Our community relations team is available 24/7 through phone at 416-202-7000 or email at [email protected]linx.com.

Why continue calling it a “subway”? From the northern edge of Holy Cross Cemetery to High Tech, and future northern extensions, this is now planned as a surface commuter train. Please stop calling it a subway (which is what should be built).

Running subway lines above ground is a proven approach in Toronto and around the world. The TTC has taken this approach with Line 1, Line 2 and Line 3, and many other transit systems have adopted it to deliver superior rapid transit within impressive timeframes. For example, the majority of stations and tracks for world-class transit services like Vancouver’s SkyTrain network and London, England’s Docklands Light Railway system are above ground. Since those systems began in the 80s, the SkyTrain has become the longest rapid transit system in Canada and the Docklands Light Railway system has grown to nearly 40 kilometres’ worth of track.

No Questions. You never give a straight answer to a question anyway. And asking a question somehow seems to lend credibility to your ridiculous Option 3 - no matter what you call your revision(s). Keep it on Yonge Street where it belongs or put it under the cemetery if you have to divert to the equally ridiculous Bridge Station.

Community input is vital to our work because it can help uncover insights we might not have anticipated. That feedback helps us refine our plans based on what we hear from communities, pending further analysis and review by our planning and design teams.

Metrolinx is committed to working with impacted communities, businesses, organizations and residents to ensure that they can provide input during the project lifecycle.

What is Community Engagement? Please clarify and identify what the role of the Community Engagement personenl is? What do they do?

Community input is vital to our work because it can help uncover insights we might not have anticipated. That feedback helps us refine our plans based on what we hear from communities, pending further analysis and review by our planning and design teams.

Metrolinx is committed to working with impacted communities, businesses, organizations and residents to ensure that they can provide input during the project lifecycle.

Meet the Speakers

Photo of Raj Khetarpal

Raj Khetarpal

Acting VP for Community Engagement – 905 Region

Photo of Stephen Collins

Stephen Collins

Program Sponsor for YNSE

Mark Ciarvarro

Mark Ciavarro

Vice President of Subways Project Delivery

Maria Doyle

Maria Doyle

Manager, Property Acquisitions

Other Attendees:

  • Leona Hollingsworth, Director, Community Engagement – 905
  • Nick Faieta, Senior Manager, Community Engagement – York Region
  • Azim Ahmed, Manager, Community Engagement Yonge North Subway Extension 

  • Sam Kulendran, Engineer, Technical Advisor
  • Nasim Bozorgmehr, Senior Advisor, Rapid Transit Planning

Format &Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions. Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policieswill result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar

Why isn't the option of using cut and cover or building elevated not being considered? The alignment passes over a wide stretch of yonge street which can easily accommodate an elevated or cut and cover section. Speeding up construction, lowering costs, and allowing addition stations to be built which currently don't fit the budget.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 2, 2022 - 21:58

When will Metrolinx provide a DETAILED map of the project to see the homes effected, the city property effected and schools.

Anonymous's avatar

We want to know which homes are impacted including those that are affected on their easements (city property) what is the total amount of homes in the transit land corridor. If the subway tunnels under the front of my home but on city property it still affects my home value… will I get compensation?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 3, 2022 - 16:01

Please provided a break down of where the money is coming from to fund this project. Federal, Provincial, Regional etc. Most importantly, please also share how much money are the developers of the new builds at high tech and bridge contributing to the subway development.

Anonymous's avatar

Which level of government, provincial, federal, regional (York), local (markham) have approved this option and who were the people who have signed off on this option for each level who have reviewed it. Can these project approval documents be reviewed for each government authority.

Anonymous's avatar

What exactly would be required (i.e. in terms of financial resources and additional time) to restore plans for the previous routing which was identified by the original EA?
And since Metrolinx has the best interests of the Royal Orchard neighbourhood in mind, why are we not hearing about your efforts in advocating for such a change in plans?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 4, 2022 - 09:34

Even low levels of noise and vibration can cause physical, emotional and especially, in children, neurological consequences. Your routing goes right under an elementary school at shallow levels. Have you factored in future treatment costs if your assumptions of mitigation were wrong. Winters Residence at York U tenants hear & feel every train.

Anonymous's avatar

Do the right thing and put it back on Yonge Street as originally planned. And no I do not want to listen to Mr. Collins drone on with his business plan explanation. This is about developers wishes and to ---- with us commoners !

Anonymous's avatar

We know that Cummer and Royal Orchard Stations may or may not be built depending on funding. It was stated that Metrolinx is working to find funding options. My question is, what do those discussions involve? Are there any specific details that can be provided? What is the probability that we will see one of them get built, and which one if so?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 4, 2022 - 10:26

Why Metrolinx cannot stop option 3 and keep the subway on Yonge. Don't them listen to voices from residents in the Royal Orchard neighbourhood whose homes would be directly impacted.
Having no more question, simply stop option 3 and keep the subway on Yonge!!!

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 4, 2022 - 12:26

As it was mentioned in the previous meetings, the option for tunneling under the cemetery instead of residential properties will be considered. Can you update us regarding this, and progress for this consideration? Can you clearly mention why tunneling under the cemetery was not considered as one of the options in the first proposals?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 5, 2022 - 17:53

Why did you change the name from Option 3 to Green Alignment? Please explain in detail.

Anonymous's avatar

Please provide details on noise, vibrations, duration and road closures during construction in the neighbourhood.

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 4, 2022 - 17:55

The scope of the Gateway development is enormous. It should be obvious to a world class designer, that a proper underground Bridge station is necessary for rider experience and weather. This would give you a real Bridge station, and us the Yonge route. With developer funds available, why are you continuing with option 3, and adding other stations.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 5, 2022 - 18:36

You never give a straight answer to a question anyway. And asking a question somehow seems to lend credibility to your ridiculous Option 3 - no matter what you call your revision(s). Keep it on Yonge Street where it belongs or put it under the cemetery if you have to divert to the equally ridiculous Bridge Station.

Anonymous's avatar

Hi there, I know that there will be a couple of stations, I was wondering Will the Yonge-Steel station be the first one that can be operated? or do we need to wait until the whole project is completed?

Anonymous's avatar

Our house is over 50 yrs old. We are seniors and this is our forever home. What effect will boring have on the stability of our home and what level of noise and vibration can we expected and for how long?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 3, 2022 - 17:05

Aren't there many, many possible unforeseen challenges of boring through bedrock under a condo building? Time, complexity, the unknown costs more. How have you budgeted for that?

Anonymous's avatar

I’ve recently purchased a property at Bay Thorn Dr and there has been couple of options for subway line but neither was under Bay Thorn and all of a sudden you’ve decided to run the line under it. Please explain what makes you believe that this is a better option? Because you are dealing with less people/houses so they can’t do anything about it?

Anonymous's avatar

You’ve modified the relatively smooth route of option1 into a northern version of your own adjusted route with its awkward tight curves. Both of these options would lead to slower speeds and squealy-wheelies. What’s really wrong with tunnelling under the Langstaff lands, or better yet, starting to curve off Yonge at the southern edge of Holy Cross?

Deborah Martin-Downs's avatar
Jan 3, 2022 - 16:20

When can we expect to see the data and analysis and/or the updated environmental assessment that is necessary to address the concerns of the neighbourhood and commenting agencies. Without this, Option 3 or variations has no legal standing as it is not an approved route

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 5, 2022 - 18:05

Please provide us with the template letter that you will use when you inform the residents of perpetual or temporary sub surface acquisition with TERMS and CONDITIONS not the compensation. You have this already. Please send this immediately to affected people.

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 19:47

From the northern edge of Holy Cross Cemetery to High Tech, and future northern extensions, this is now planned as a surface commuter train. Please stop calling it a subway (which is what should be built).

Anonymous's avatar
Dec 28, 2021 - 12:26

How many tracks will there be north of high tech? for how long? and store how many trains?

Anonymous's avatar

The City council held an emergency virtual meeting in Dec. Why are you bypassing and throwing away all of the city plans for Markham? Why is a developer or infracstructure company the name and face of the Bridge and High Tech developments? Who elected them? How do they benefit from the designation of of TOC or an MZO?

Anonymous's avatar

Does the recent revised route mean the train emerges above ground at a different spot or same?

Anonymous's avatar

A decision has been made regarding thee routing of the subway. When will Metrolinx be honest and simply tell people that we have no say in the matter and if we do not agree to Metrolinx terms the land required will be expropriated?

Anonymous's avatar
Dec 17, 2021 - 21:42

We live at Kensington Ave., three streets west of finch and hendon. Traffic is fairly bad and loud on Hendon and there are many families who avail of the facilities at Hendon Park. What measures will you take to address traffic and pedestrian safety on Hendon? Will there be cross walks, widening of Hendon street?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 5, 2022 - 17:47

Please provide us with a complete list of questions and answers to date as a PDF. A web version is not enough as that is not AODA compliant under the Accessibility for Ontarians with Disabilities Act, 2005.

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 18:22

I am re-visiting the alignment beneath the cemetery. Since the Building Transit Faster Act apparently allows the province to do what it wants, why does Option 3 not simply go beneath the cemetery to get to your precious Bridge station above grade? It's the most direct route with far less of a turn to the east and then back to the north?

Anonymous's avatar

Leitchcroft and Times Ave neighborhood of 10,000 people is a very short bike ride to the new subway stations but there are currently no safe AAA bike paths to get there. What are the plans?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 3, 2022 - 17:06

Since no one at the province answers the taxpayer (Premier or Minister of Transportation) maybe you can tell us - are your planned TOC going to be turned into MZO's?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 12:20

Where will the bus terminal at Steeles and Clerk stations be located? How large will they be? Will they be at grade or underground?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 15:41

You have stated that the tunneling will start at the north end. Why wouldn't you start at Finch and work north? Logically that makes more sense, so that it's easier to accommodate changes in assumptions based on how things actually develop. For example, there may be some major event such that it would make sense to stop at Steeles.

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 18:50

Based on our previous experiences, does anyone REALLY believe the timeline and cost estimates? We know better about what will really happen, right? Thank you

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 19:05

Now that Metrolinx has informed residents of the project travelling under homes and properties, you can surely advise us on what we need to do to protect our properties from potential noise/vibrations/damage ( during construction and during the operations of the trains).

Anonymous's avatar

Option 3 does not provide the best transportation solution for the existing residents of York Region in general. The needs of the current population are being compromised to provide the maximum benefit to the developers and future residents of a community that won’t be built out for 20 to 30 years.

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 20:48

My neighbour (19 Thorny Brae Dr) told me today that his decision to abandon his plan to rebuild his home was in part or whole caused by pressure from Metrolinx. In order to receive the required variance from Markham he was told he had to agree to a lifetime lien on his property from Metrolinx. Is there any truth to this… if so please explain why!

Anonymous's avatar
Dec 24, 2021 - 04:40

I support the underground subway. When will it start?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 08:31

In defence of having 2 stations at the north end Stephen Collins stated that they serve 2 separate functions: High Tech as a terminal station and Bridge as a transit hub. But today we have Kipling Station on Line 2 which is both. It still doesn’t make sense to have 2 stations 300m apart.

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 17:59

Now you have informed us of the project travelling under our homes, you can advise us on what we need to do to protect our homes/properties from potential noise/vibrations/damage. You said you have experts so you should be able to give us advise on what should/can we do to protect our buildings above the planned project part for preventative care.

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 18:26

A previous proposal required the demolition of the Bantry Bridge and rebuilding it over a 6 month period to have adequate storage of trains north of the last subway stop. Is this still required with the updated alignment that introduced High Tech / Bridge Stations instead of one station at the Richmond Hill Centre?

Anonymous's avatar

Naming the the revised route the Green Alignment implies that it’s now environmentally friendly. This suggests that MX knew that the original route wasn’t. Why not? The revised Green Alignment still isn’t green.

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 16:16

You have stated that the tunneling will start at the north end. Why wouldn't you start at Finch and work north? Logically that makes more sense, so that it's easier to accommodate changes in assumptions based on how things actually develop. For example, there may be some major event such that it would make sense to stop at Steeles.

Anonymous's avatar

Is it the City of Markham or the Provincial Government? If the Provincial Govt. approves the project and City of Markham rejects the current plan who has the final say?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 5, 2022 - 18:27

Has Metrolinx indeed dismissed options one and two in favour of option three? Is there no option to change your minds?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 11:45

We have a park that begins at Kirk and travels north or south to Royal Orchard. What are the plans for this park if option 3 is inevitable?
How will Metrolinx accommodate the community in the future. Is there a plan for tree's, plants and wildlife?
It is said that a project through our community will take more than 10 years? True/False

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 18:12

The letter of Dec 8 states that the depth ranges anywhere between 21 meters and 50 meters. Inform the affected homes what is the expected depth under each home as per your current plan. Not only the depth of the track from the floor of our basement (foundation) but also the depth of the top of the tunnel under the floor of the basement (foundation)

Anonymous's avatar

How can we trust the blanket statement that revised option #2 is inferior to the new Green Alignment without supporting details? How do we know that all relevant factors were taken into consideration?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 4, 2022 - 16:56

Please clarify and identify what the role of the Community Engagement personenl is? What do they do?

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2022 - 19:08

The Metrolinx letter of Dec8 sates that the depth ranges anywhere between 21 to 50 meters. Residents want to know what is the expected depth under each home as per your current plans? And not only the depth of the track from the floor of our basement (foundation) but also what is the depth of the top of the tunnel under the floor of the basement.

Anonymous's avatar

Has it been considered for the extension to rise to the surface north-east of Steeles and follow the CN rail corridor east until it reaches the Richmond Hill GO corridor, following it up to High Tech station? This route would require 3.5 km less tunnelling, saving over $1 billion, and John-Bayview is more prone for densification compared to Centre.

Anonymous's avatar

Hendon street is already very crowded and the extension will likely result in increased traffic. The current 4 way stop sign at Beecroft and Hendon needs to be replaced by a traffic light ir crosswalk for pedestrian safety.

Anonymous's avatar

What is the planned completion date for the last subway station (at Yonge and 7)?