> The Ontario Line - Neighbourhood Updates - East - Lakeshore East Joint Corridor | Metrolinx Engage

Lakeshore East Joint Corridor

The Ontario Line - Neighbourhood Updates - East - Lakeshore East Joint Corridor

Significant design and engineering work is being done to avoid impacts to bordering properties, such as the Jimmie Simpson Recreation Centre, Bonjour Brioche bakery and café, and Fontbonne Ministries, to name a few. Streamlining Ontario Line construction work with planned GO Expansion work within the existing Metrolinx-owned rail corridor means we can keep mostly within our existing property boundaries and significantly reduce impacts to surrounding neighbourhoods, including park spaces.

cross-section of joint corridor showing Ontario Line trains and GO trains image 1

Cross section north of Queen Street at the north end of Jimmie Simpson Recreation Centre

By keeping our work mostly within the existing rail corridor, we’re also able to provide additional green space to the community following construction.

Once the Ontario Line is complete, each of the four park spaces in the area – Jimmie Simpson Park, Bruce Mackey Park, McCleary Playground and the Gerrard-Carlaw Parkette – will be larger. In total, there will be nearly 2,600 square metres of added green space lining these parks.

graphic showing permanent park take and new park space at McCleary playground and Jimmie Simpson

Graphic showing permanent park take and new park space at McCleary playground and Jimmie Simpson

McCleary Playground will be approximately 300 square metres bigger because we are able to build our retaining walls within Metrolinx land, closer to the tracks than the current fence is. The same is true for Jimmie Simpson Park, where approximately 700 square metres of new green space will be accessible to the public thanks to a slimmer rail corridor footprint.

graphic showing amount of permanent park take and new park space at Jimmie Simpson and Bruce Mackey parks.

Graphic showing amount of permanent park take and new park space at Jimmie Simpson and Bruce Mackey parks

In Bruce Mackey Park, a small sliver of land extending about two metres beyond the rail corridor at the south end of the park is needed for the new station. This will be more than made up for by the release of additional green space in the northern section of the park, resulting in approximately 1,100 square metres of net new green space.

graphic showing amount of park impacts and new park space at Gerrard Parkette

Graphic showing amount of park impacts and new park space at Gerrard-Carlaw Parkette

A property next to the Gerrard-Carlaw Parkette and dog park is needed to support the construction of a new station at the intersection, but once complete, it will be added to the parkette. Though some space from the existing parkette will be needed to accommodate the new station, there will be approximately 500 square metres of extra space in the reconfigured park when the neighbouring land is factored in.

The new green space is possible because new noise and retaining walls will fit almost entirely within the existing GO rail corridor and will be even closer to the tracks than the fence that borders them today. Once the walls are in place, the existing fences will be removed to create more green space the community can access.

Protecting tree cover is also a priority in our planning. While some trees will need to be removed to make room for construction and new infrastructure, we will be doing all we can to maintain or enhance tree cover in the community. For any one tree we need to remove from a park here in the city, our goal is to work with city partners to ensure that three new ones are planted nearby.

We are working with the city to see how we can help improve all park spaces in the area when we’re done with Ontario Line construction. That will include consulting with the community on noise wall materials and surrounding landscaping treatments so we can ensure park spaces stay beautiful and green as we lower noise levels in the area.

New Rail Bridges

New rail bridges at Eastern Avenue, Queen Street, Dundas Street and Logan Avenue will be built to revitalize the neighbourhoods and improve traffic flow.

The bridges, which currently accommodate both GO and VIA Rail services, are located within the shared rail corridor where Ontario Line tracks will also be located.

We are replacing the bridges because they need to line up with the new tracks we are adding to support expanded GO services as well as the existing tracks that will be repositioned to make room for the Ontario Line. Ontario Line-only bridges will be built next to the new GO rail bridges.

Bridges will be replaced in consultation with the city and we will be building them to their current standards, with five metres between the bottom of the bridge and the roadway. By comparison, the Queen Street bridge has a clearance of only 3.9 metres. This means the connecting rail tracks must also be higher. They will be raised by 1.1 metres at Queen, 0.9 metres at Dundas, and 0.6 metres at Logan. Requirements for the bridge at Eastern Avenue are being finalized as part of the SmartTrack program.

While bridge construction will result in temporary traffic and transit impacts, Metrolinx will communicate these impacts early and often through many different communications channels to help people plan their trips in advance.

Replacing these bridges now means they will last for at least another 100 years and will avoid the need for frequent and disruptive repair work on aging infrastructure.

How will Metrolinx address noise and vibration impacts of the Ontario Line in Riverside and Leslieville?

Noise walls will be installed along the existing GO rail corridor through the Riverside and Leslieville area, and Metrolinx will also pursue an array of other solutions to keep noise and vibration to a minimum.

noise wall concept

Early study results show our planned mitigation measures will make the sound of every passing train lower than today, with average noise levels lower than they currently are at the majority of locations along the joint corridor.

We’ll achieve these long-awaited improvements by ensuring the rail is continuously welded with no joints, procuring quiet Ontario Line trains, electrifying GO trains that run in the joint rail corridor, installing effective and well-designed noise barriers and implementing other proven solutions that will significantly reduce noise and vibration impacts not only from the Ontario Line but from the existing GO and VIA trains that currently use the corridor.

More details on these studies will be released for public review and comment when the draft early works environmental assessment for the joint corridor is released in fall 2021.

In addition to the consultation that will take place as part of the early works environmental assessment for the joint corridor, Metrolinx will work with the City of Toronto and local community on landscaping options, streetscaping and street furniture opportunities to animate spaces and minimize the visual impact of any sound barriers.

Rearranging tracks, installing new tracks, and building new noise and retaining walls will be part of the Lakeshore East Joint Corridor Early Works construction project that will begin in 2022.

Technical drawings

Joint Corridor Rollplot

The rollplot is a common engineering document that shows a detailed overhead view of planned infrastructure (tracks, stations, bridges, retaining walls, etc.) and side (“profile”) views that show the height of that infrastructure compared to existing ground levels and structures.

Click on the image for a detailed view of Ontario Line plans in the joint corridor, and please reach out to [email protected] if you have any questions about what you see.

Rollplot overhead view of the Ontario Line through the Lakeshore East Joint Corridor. Click to expand.

Rollplot overhead view of the Ontario Line through the Lakeshore East Joint Corridor. Click to expand.