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Downtown Segment

The Ontario Line - Neighbourhood Updates - Downtown

The following maps show refinements to the alignment, or route of the line, and the proposed location of station platforms. Station entrance buildings and initial designs will be shared as new information is available. Teams have been studying how to speed up delivery, reduce building costs, minimize community impacts and improve connections for customers.

map of the downtown segment of the Ontario line

The new plan takes advantage of space that was dug for an east-west line when TTC’s Queen Station was built in the early 1950s.

map of the downtown segment of the Osgoode station

1. Reaching University Avenue, the Ontario Line connects customers to an array of shopping, dining and entertainment options, not to mention major employment centres in this area of downtown.

2. The station has been positioned to the west to improve customer transfers between Line 1 and the Ontario Line, making getting from point A to point B quick and convenient. Going to the Art Gallery of Ontario? Just take Line 1 one stop north and you’ll be there in no time. Heading to the Royal Ontario Museum? It’s just two stops further.

Work is anticipated to begin after financial close is reached for the Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnel procurement package.

map of the downtown segment of the Queen station

1. The station at Queen Street and Yonge Street will make use of an underground cavern below Queen Street, built during construction of the first section of the Yonge Street subway. Due to the complexity of building directly under the existing Queen Station, Metrolinx is working closely with the City of Toronto and businesses to develop strategies to mitigate impacts during construction.

2. Shifting the stations at both Osgoode and Queen to be directly below and perpendicular to (or straddling) Line 1 will save customers time when transferring between the two lines. Another benefit of this positioning is to lessen the impact on existing utilities and any potentially disruptive, expensive and time-consuming relocations.

Work is anticipated to begin after financial close is reached for the Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnel procurement package.

map of King and Bathurst station and line segment

1. A station in the Moss Park area will be located on the edge of the park which reduces construction impacts on traffic and transit flow along Queen Street. After construction, the park area will be restored and returned to the city for programming or redevelopment.

2. Subway service in this area will help relieve congestion on the popular 501 Queen streetcar route. It will also provide better rapid transit access to people who depend on social service organizations in the area.

3. Students attending the George Brown College St. James Campus will have two choices for boarding the Ontario Line – a station in the area of Moss Park or a station in the neighbouring area of Corktown.

Work is anticipated to begin after financial close is reached for the Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnel procurement package.

map of the line segment containing the corktown station

1. The station serving Corktown will be located to the east side of Berkeley Street at King Street East, with connections to several streetcar and bus routes nearby. Positioning the station to the east reduces costs and will speed up construction of the station and tunnels. Importantly, it also reduces community impacts by moving construction off the street. This station will provide customers with easy access to the historic Distillery District.

2. This area – currently home to large retail operations and a significant number of surface parking spots – is where the first two Parliament Buildings for Upper Canada were located, from 1797 to 1813 and 1820 to 1824. Archaeological assessments are currently being planned in advance of any potential use for the project. Metrolinx will work with the Ontario Heritage Trust, the City of Toronto, property owners, and community members to ensure any archaeological findings or historical features are properly documented or conserved and, where possible, made accessible for the public to learn more about. The important history of the land goes back much further than the first parliament buildings and Metrolinx is committed to working with Indigenous communities to better understand the important histories and rights of the peoples that have and continue to live in this area.

Work is anticipated to begin after archaeological assessments are completed and once financial close is reached for the Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnel procurement package.

map of the line segment containing the Don Yard

1. Just west of Cherry Street, the tunnels enter the GO corridor and begin to rise, exiting tunnel portals on the north and south sides of the GO tracks in the Don Yard.

2. Making use of the existing GO corridor means we can shrink our footprint and make efficient use of existing transit space, therefore minimizing impacts to surrounding communities and keeping costs down. The tunnel boring machines will end their digging through downtown here.

Canada Line with a tunnel portal shown in the background - Translink photo
Canada Line with a tunnel portal shown in the background - Translink photo

Work is anticipated to begin after financial close is reached for the Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnel procurement package.

For more detail, visit Metrolinx News.
 

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