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Downtown Segment

The Ontario Line - Neighbourhood Updates - Downtown

The following plans describe the alignment (route) of the line, and the proposed location of station structures and entrance locations.

map of the downtown segment of the Ontario line

We are making important progress on bringing more rapid transit to downtown Toronto with the Ontario Line. The stations at Osgoode, Queen, Moss Park and Corktown will give people fast and easy connections between the Ontario Line and other major transit routes. The stations have been designed to put customers close to popular streetcar and subway routes and to develop a truly integrated transit network, making it as simple as possible to experience the city and the whole Greater Golden Horseshoe all with the simple tap of a PRESTO card. This will help spread demand across the existing network and make it easier for people to choose transit first.

Two-dimensional map of two future station entrance buildings at Osgoode station and the surrounding area. One building is located on the northeast corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue, and the second building is located on the southwest corner of Queen Street West and Simcoe Street. The map depicts a rough outline of the projected station buildings’ footprints, anticipated station entrance points, permanent property requirements, and streetcar routes and stops.
Three-dimensional map of permanent property impacts at Osgoode station. A burnt-orange colour denotes properties that will be permanently impacted by Ontario Line construction, including the following: 205 Queen Street West on the southwest corner of Queen Street West and Simcoe Street; and a portion of the property at 130 Queen Street West on the northeast corner of Queen Street West and University Avenue.

Property impacts

Three-dimensional map of future Ontario Line Osgoode station at surface level. A purple colour denotes the locations of the station and its entrances.

Future state concept

The Ontario Line will link directly to Line 1 at Osgoode Station, giving customers an important connection to and from the existing subway network.

New station entrances on the northeast and southwest corners of the University Avenue and Queen Street intersection will create needed capacity for an increasing number of subway customers. They’ll also make it easy for customers coming from underground to get to directly to eastbound or westbound streetcar stops without having to cross the wide and busy intersection.

During the busiest travel hour, we expect 12,000 customers will use the new Ontario Line station with an estimated 5,700 people transferring between Line 1 and the Ontario Line during the busiest travel hour.

There will also be another 1,000 transfers to and from the 501 Queen streetcar, giving people even more ways to navigate and explore the city.

The Ontario Line station at Osgoode will be within a short 10-minute walk of more than 16,500 residents, bringing another rapid transit option to a community where 8,700 households don’t currently own a car. It will also connect to more than 110,500 jobs in the area.

Stats and Facts*

  • 16,500 people within walking distance to station
  • 12,000 customers will use the station during the busiest travel hour (3,000 getting on and 9,000 getting off the Ontario Line)
  • 5,700 Line 1 transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 1,000 surface transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 110,500 jobs in the area

*Forecast for the year 2041.

Two-dimensional map of future station entrance points at Queen station and the surrounding area at each corner of the Queen Street and Yonge Street intersection in Toronto. The map depicts a rough outline of the projected station buildings footprints, anticipated station entrance points, permanent property requirements, and streetcar routes and stops.
Three-dimensional map of future Ontario Line Queen station at surface level. A purple colour denotes the locations of the station and its entrances, which will be shared with Line 1.

Future state concept

The Ontario Line will provide a vital transfer point with Line 1 at Queen Station, allowing customers to seamlessly transfer between the two lines to get to the heart of the city and beyond.

With seven entry points to this important transfer hub in the city’s downtown core, about 16,600 people are expected to use Queen Station during the busiest travel hour.

Located in one of the city’s top spots for work, shopping and entertainment, an estimated 6,700 people are expected to transfer between the Ontario Line and Line 1 and surface routes each day during the busiest travel hour.

The station will be within a short 10-minute walk for more than 18,400 residents and connect people to 150,000 jobs in an area of the city where 5,100 households don’t currently own a car.

Stats and Facts*

  • 18,400 people within walking distance to station
  • 16,600 customers will use the station during the busiest travel hour (4,500 getting on and 12,100 getting off the Ontario Line)
  • 6,100 Line 1 transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 600 surface transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 150,000 jobs in the area

*Forecast for the year 2041

Two-dimensional map of the future station entrance building at Moss Park station and the surrounding area. The entrance building is located at the northwest corner of Queen Street East and Sherbourne Street. The map depicts a rough outline of the projected station buildings’ footprints, anticipated station entrance points, permanent property requirements, and streetcar routes and stops.
Three-dimensional map of permanent property impact at Moss Park station. A burnt-orange colour denotes the portion of land on the northwest corner of northwest corner of Queen Street East and Sherbourne Street that will be permanently impacted by Ontario Line construction.

Permanent property impacts

Three-dimensional map of future Ontario Line Moss Park station at surface level. A purple colour denotes the locations of the station and its entrance.

Future state concept

The Ontario Line station at Moss Park will connect a dense and fast-growing area of the city to the subway network. An estimated 7,300 people are expected to use Moss Park station during the busiest travel hour.

A new Ontario Line connection here will help relieve congestion on popular surface routes, like the 75 Sherbourne bus and 501 Queen streetcar, with almost 1,500 customers transferring to and from the Ontario Line every day during the busiest travel hour.

The station will be within a short 10-minute walk for more than 23,600 residents, in an area of the city where 4,100 households don’t currently own a car.

Students attending the George Brown College St. James Campus will have two choices for boarding the Ontario Line – a station in the area of Moss Park or a station in the neighbouring area of Corktown.

After construction, the park area will be restored and returned to the city for programming or redevelopment.

Stats and Facts*

  • 23,600 people within walking distance to station
  • 7,300 customers will use the station during the busiest travel hour (2,500 getting on and 4,800 getting off the Ontario Line)
  • 1,500 surface transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 23,200 jobs in the area

*Forecast for the year 2041

Two-dimensional map of the future station entrance building at Corktown station and the surrounding area. The station serving Corktown will be located to the east side of Berkeley Street at King Street East. The map depicts a rough outline of the projected station buildings’ footprints, anticipated station entrance points, permanent property requirements, and streetcar routes and stops.
Three-dimensional map of permanent property impacts at Corktown station. A burnt-orange colour denotes properties that will be permanently impacted by Ontario Line construction, including the following: 25 Berkeley Street, 250 Front Street East, 265 Front Street East, 271 Front Street East, 44 Parliament Street, 68 Parliament Street, and70 Parliament Street.

Permanent property impacts

Three-dimensional map of future Ontario Line Corktown station at surface level. A purple colour denotes the locations of the station and its entrance

Future state concept

The Ontario Line station serving Corktown will make it easier for people to visit this new and growing neighborhood and the nearby Distillery District.

A new Ontario Line connection here will connect to popular surface routes such as the 504 King Streetcar, 65 Parliament bus and 172 Cherry Street bus.

The station will be within a short 10-minute walk for more than 26,400 residents, in an area of the city where 3,300 households don’t currently own a car. An estimated 4,100 people are expected to use Corktown station during the busiest travel hour.

The site south of Front Street which includes the First Parliament site is required to support construction in order to minimize impacts to the street.

Metrolinx recognizes the extensive work the City and its partners have done to create a vision for the First Parliament site. Metrolinx will be working closely with Indigenous communities, the Ontario Heritage Trust, the City of Toronto and the public to advance those plans as part of a Heritage Interpretation and Commemoration Plan.

The important history of the land goes back much further than the first parliament buildings and Metrolinx is committed to working with Indigenous communities to better understand the important histories and rights of the peoples that have and continue to live in this area.

Early works and environmental due diligence activities such as archaeological assessments will begin on these sites as early as September 2021.

Final designs for these sites will be determined through the Transit-Oriented Communities Program.

Stats and Facts*

  • 26,400 people within walking distance to station
  • 4,100 customers will use the station during the busiest travel hour (2,800 getting on and 1,300 getting off the Ontario Line)
  • 1,900 surface transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 15,700 jobs in the area

*Forecast for the year 2041

photo of existing Lower Don Bridge with Don Yard

Photo by Brian Main/Metrolinx

Just west of Cherry Street, the tunnels enter the GO corridor and begin to rise, exiting tunnel portals on the north side of the GO tracks in the Don Yard.

Making use of the existing GO corridor means we can shrink our footprint and make efficient use of existing transit space, therefore minimizing impacts to surrounding communities and keeping costs down. The tunnel boring machines will end their digging through downtown here.

Canada Line with a tunnel portal shown in the background - Translink photo
Canada Line with a tunnel portal shown in the background - Translink photo

Work is anticipated to begin after financial close is reached for the Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnel procurement package.

For more detail, visit Metrolinx News.
 

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