> The Ontario Line LIVE - Osgoode, Queen, Moss Park, Corktown – June 17, 2021 | Metrolinx Engage

Osgoode, Queen, Moss Park, Corktown

The Ontario Line LIVE - Osgoode, Queen, Moss Park, Corktown – June 17, 2021

Archive - June 17, 2021

On June 17, 2021, Metrolinx hosted a presentation and live Q&A focused on Osgoode, Queen, Moss Park and Corktown stations with over 80 people in attendance. During the virtual open house, we answered top-voted questions submitted by registrants, as well as live questions from participants using a Zoom call-in option. Participants asked a variety of questions related to the station entrance locations, construction approach, heritage conservation, and more. We’ll be posting answers to questions from the event on this page soon.
 
For those who weren’t able to join us, you’ll find the video recording below. We’re looking forward to holding many more meetings in the future.

Agenda

6:30: Meeting Begins/ Opening Remarks

6:35: Ontario Line Project Update

7:00: Questions and Answers

8:00: Wrap up & Closing Remarks

Your Questions Answered:

Why can’t you turn the line down at Parliament instead of the side streets at Ontario street and Berkley street?

The Ontario Line project alignment was actively designed to minimize impact and to keep construction activities off the main roads. Where possible, the stations are mined to avoid road impacts, but where heavy construction activities are anticipated, construction and laydown areas are carefully chosen. The Corktown site was preferred for its suitability as a construction laydown area and for tunnelling activities that may occur concurrently heading towards the Downtown Core and Don Yard.

What about construction noise levels/ times if government has exempt projects like the Ontario Line?

During construction, we will continue to work with communities to ensure a comprehensive array of measures are in place to address any noise or vibration impacts. Construction noise mitigation measures may include but won’t be limited to performing construction during daytime hours where possible, using equipment compliant with noise level specifications from the Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks, and siting construction vehicles and construction laydown and staging areas away from sensitive locations where possible. Other practical steps we take to reduce noise and vibration in residential areas include fitting equipment with muffling devices and coordinating construction schedules so that noisy operations do not occur simultaneously. These mitigation measures will be refined and updated as project planning progresses.

As a part of the Environmental Impact Assessment Report (forthcoming early 2022), a detailed noise and vibration assessment will be completed for the Ontario Line to ensure that potential impacts are identified, and appropriate and site-specific mitigation measures are in place during both the construction and operations phase. These commitments will be carried forward into constructor contracts. In addition, prior to any construction commencing, the constructor must demonstrate to Metrolinx how they will comply with these limits, including details on mitigation measures to be employed. This will all be documented in the constructor’s Noise and Vibration Management Plans (NVMP) that will need to be reviewed and approved by Metrolinx. Noise and vibration will also be monitored during construction in areas identified in the Noise and Vibration Management Plans to ensure that the work is within applicable noise and vibration limits.

With the creation of Osgoode and Queen Stations will line 1 need to suspend some services for these stations to be created?

We’re working closely with the City and TTC to develop a plan to keep Toronto moving, even during construction. These plans will include making sure any impacts to Line 1 or streetcar service are avoided, and if required are temporary and communicated early.

With both tracks now on north side, please give details about the now wider Don Yard portal. Will Richmond Hill GO need to shift a bit north? Will bridge still have peds/bikes?

While the portal itself will need to be wider to accommodate two tracks side-by-side, it won’t take up any additional room in the corridor compared to the previous configuration. The Richmond Hill tracks will be realigned to facilitate the construction of the portal and then moved to a final configuration above the portal. While the design work is still underway, the current plan for this area is to provide pedestrian and cycling connections across the Don River to ensure communities continue to develop and thrive with improved transit.

How will the section between Corktown station and East Harbour be built?

This will be constructed as twin tunnels between Corktown station heading east towards the Don Yard area. Just west of Cherry Street, the tunnels will enter the GO corridor (beneath the GO track) and tunnel portals would be constructed for the trains to exit on the north side of the GO tracks in the Don Yard area. The tracks will then rise through the portal to cross the Don River towards East Harbour station on a bridge.

What will happen with homeless people who regularly hang out in Moss Park during construction of that station?

Where we do need to temporarily occupy some park space to support construction and avoid impacts to nearby homes and businesses, we will work closely with the city and relevant community organizations to ensure that all work is thoughtfully and sensitively executed. We are always striving to minimize the footprint of our work wherever possible. Construction in this area is not anticipated to begin until 2023.

When will we have Early Works details for the portal and Lower Don Bridge? Is it true Mx intends to use the future school site for staging? For how many years?

Metrolinx is working closely with the Toronto District School Board (TDSB) on an approach to access the TDSB lands envisioned for the West Don lands school as part of the construction staging/laydown area and construction of the retaining wall required for the Ontario Line.

This temporary requirement will be returned to the TDSB once construction and the staging/laydown area is no longer required.

Collaborative conversations with the TDSB are ongoing, and every opportunity will be made to notify the community regarding the progress of these discussions as soon as possible.

I am wondering if Metrolinx will include community benefits targets on this project. Youth in this community would like opportunity for career in construction

The four pillar projects in the Subway Program portfolio will support the combined equivalent of more than 12,000 full-time jobs through each year of construction.

We want to make sure the Ontario Line becomes a valued part of the community. Transit projects like this deliver significant benefits to the community in the form of better access to transit, shorter journeys across the city, better access to jobs, and less traffic on our roadways

Metrolinx understands we have a responsibility to help connect communities, in more ways than one. We are committed to ensuring that our vital transit projects also provide benefits for the communities in which they’re being built. That includes searching out and recruiting the best local talent, providing training and apprenticeship opportunities for people living in those communities and looking for local suppliers and procurement opportunities where possible.

We’re working with the Province to implement community benefits for this project throughout its lifecycle.

How was potential ridership counted?

The ridership projection numbers for the Ontario Line are included in the Preliminary Design Business Case (PDBC) in Table 4-1 on page 65 or E-2 in the Executive Summary, and the modelling assumptions are provided on page 94. The projected daily ridership on the Ontario Line was determined through travel demand modelling, which considered changes in land use patterns and the transportation network, along with population and employment growth profiles to estimate demand and benefits across the lifecycle of the project.

How many tree injuries and tree removals will there be?

How many trees will be removed on the Osgoode Hall property?

How many mature trees will be injured or removed by building the Corktown station?

Metrolinx is committed to avoiding tree removal wherever possible. We do know that some trees will need to be removed to complete both the Early Works as well as the main works for the Ontario Line. We are working to advance the details to confirm which trees will have unavoidable impacts and need to be removed. Any tree removal on public/city land will require permits from the City of Toronto which necessitate a 3:1 replacement ratio. Metrolinx also follows our Vegetation Compensation Guideline that dictates how tree removal and compensation takes place on our own land. More details on tree removal and compensation will be provided in our Environmental Impact Assessment Report that will be made available to public review in early 2022.

Why is 15 years extensive work on the historically importance of the First Parliament site to The City, Province and Canada just being thrown out the window?

Metrolinx recognizes the extensive work the City and its partners have completed envisioning a new future for the First Parliament Site. A great deal of thought and planning has gone into existing plans for the site and we look forward to continuing to build on that good work.

In consultation with its partners at Infrastructure Ontario and the Ministry of Transportation, Metrolinx will be working with Indigenous Nations, the Ontario Heritage Trust, City of Toronto, community groups and the public to develop an Interpretation and Commemoration Plan for the First Parliament Site.

The Interpretation and Commemoration Plan will draw upon the First Parliament Heritage Interpretation Strategy (2020) and Master Plan (once finalized by the City).

Engagement and feedback opportunities are upcoming.

Please explain how mechanical diggers are more effective in uncovering additional artifacts on the First Parliament site then professional archaeologists?

Detailed archaeological workplans have been developed for the First Parliament site in consultation with City of Toronto, Infrastructure Ontario, Mississaugas of the Credit First Nation, and the Ministry of Heritage Sport Tourism and Culture Industries (MHSTCI). The workplans are now under review for final approval from MHSTCI. Stages 2-4 Archeological Assessment work is slated to begin this fall 2021. This program has been carefully designed to uncover and conserve artifacts and potentials features that may be on the First Parliament site. In areas anticipated to have highest archaeological potential, hand digging will take place to ensure we are taking the utmost care. It’s important to clarify that no Ontario Line construction work will take place at this location until the archaeological work has been completed and cleared by MHSTCI.

Contract language for the Heritage Interpretation, noise, and vibration matters was promised. When will we receive that language?

We are working with elected officials to set up a Construction Liaison Committee (CLC) which will consist of community representatives and meet regularly as we advance towards construction in order to address and resolve community and resident concerns and complaints.

We are eager to engage with the community on the Heritage Interpretation and Commemoration Plan for the First Parliament site. Engagement and feedback opportunities are upcoming.

Will the historic fence and grounds of Osgoode Hall be affected in any way by the construction of the Queen and University station?

There are five corners we investigated before we determined the two station entrance locations. There will be an impact on the historic fence, but we will protect, conserve, and reinstate it after the station and entrance is constructed.

Avoidance is always our preference. We are trying to minimize the footprint of the station to the greatest extent possible. We will have to remove a section of the fence while construction is underway, and this will give us an opportunity to do restoration on the fence. We will work with the Law Society of Ontario, City Heritage Planning and the Ministry of Heritage Sport Tourism and Culture Industries (MHSTCI) to make sure we are not impacting more than we need to. We will provide more information as it’s available.

What safeguards are being taken to make sure that the heritage cottage rowhouses on the east side of Berkeley (between Adelaide and King St) are not damaged?

Metrolinx has a built in a number of safety measures into the Ontario Line program to ensure heritage homes and attributes are handled with the utmost care. All known or potential heritage properties were evaluated and catalogued in our Cultural Heritage Report that was released in 2020. As a part of the Environmental Impact Assessment Report (forthcoming early 2022), a detailed noise and vibration assessment will be completed for the Ontario Line to ensure that potential impacts are identified and appropriate, site specific, solutions are in place. These commitments will be carried forward into constructor contracts. These commitments include very stringent vibration criteria for heritage homes. In addition, prior to any construction starting, the constructor must demonstrate to Metrolinx how they will comply with these limits, including details solutions that will be used. This will all be documented in the constructor’s noise/vibration management plans that will need to be review and approved by Metrolinx. Lastly, Metrolinx requires constructors to undertake ongoing, real-time noise and vibration monitoring for the duration of the construction activities to ensure that all work is well within acceptable limits

When you say you are working with top Heritage experts do you mean third party review? Are these consultants identified anywhere?

Metrolinx has several Heritage consultants included in our technical advisory team. In addition, Metrolinx is working with the City of Toronto Heritage Planning, MCFN, IO and the Ministry of Heritage Sport Tourism and Culture Industries (MHSTCI), and will be working in collaboration with Ontario Heritage Trust as we continue to advance an Interpretation and Commemoration Plan for the First Parliament site.

What is the mechanism for complaints about noise and vibration?

The Ontario Line Community Relations Team can be reached at [email protected] or 416-202-5100 and will continue to be available throughout construction to address such concerns. The team will work closely with the project delivery team and the constructor once procurement wraps up, to address community concerns.

What is the communication protocol which includes the timely resolution of complaints for noise, vibration, air quality, traffic, etc.?

The Ontario Line Community Relations Team is available to the community and public and will continue to be throughout construction. The team can be reached at [email protected] or 416-202-5100.

Metrolinx will also work to set up a Construction Liaison Committee (CLC) which will consist of community representatives and meet regularly as we advance towards construction to resolve complaints and concerns. The team will work closely with the project delivery team and the constructor once procurement wraps up, to address community concerns such as noise and vibration.

What is going to be the level of vibration and noise from the rock boring? Why isn't there an Environmental Assessment of the proposed Ontario Line?

Metrolinx is doing several environmental assessments for the Ontario Line as per Ontario Regulation 341/20. The environmental assessment process for the Ontario Line is designed to ensure we can build this priority transit project faster while upholding strict environmental commitments. The new process largely follows the existing Environmental Assessment Transit Project Assessment Process, except that it has added flexibility. This allows for more certainty in project planning, reduces the risk of delays, and still provides for environmental oversight and consultation with the public and Indigenous Nations.

As a part of the Environmental Impact Assessment Report (forthcoming early 2022), a detailed noise and vibration assessment will be completed for the Ontario Line to ensure that potential impacts are identified, and appropriate site-specific mitigation measures are in place. These commitments will be carried forward into constructor contracts. Construction noise mitigation measures may include but won’t be limited to performing construction during daytime hours where possible, using equipment compliant with noise level specifications from the Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks, and siting construction vehicles and construction laydown and staging areas away from sensitive locations where possible. Other practical steps we take to reduce noise and vibration in residential areas include fitting equipment with muffling devices and coordinating construction schedules so that noisy operations do not occur simultaneously. These mitigation measures will be refined and updated as project planning progresses.

To learn more about noise and vibration, please see the Ontario Line Noise and Vibration Info Sheet as well as the Ontario Line Final Noise and Vibration Environmental Conditions Report (Section 2 and 3 of the report describe how the baseline noise and vibration conditions were determined).

Corktown: Why isn't the huge entire block of Staples & Porsche enough space for the tunnel work staging?

Unconvinced the First Parliament site needs to be included

Considering the lack of available space in the downtown core, the Staples site north of Front Street will be the launch site of the tunnel boring machines that will be used to dig out and construct the tunnels across the downtown segment, in addition to being the home of the station itself.

Considering the scope of the tunneling work required across the downtown segment and to limit impacts to transit and traffic in the area, additional space is required in close proximity to support this work.

How will businesses on the south side of Queen St opposite the station be protected?

We’re committed to ensuring local businesses stay open and accessible throughout this important project.

We’ll develop a suite of initiatives for the business community that will focus on collaboration, flexibility and transparency including making sure store fronts are clear and easy to access, working together on promotions and incentives, and being clear about know who to call with questions or concerns.

Once property impacts are identified, Metrolinx will work closely with the affected owners and businesses to identify what the impacts will be and how we can mitigate.

What is the meaning of permanent property requirements?

Permanent property requirements are continuous rights over a portion, or all the land needed at surface or below surface to allow for Ontario Line construction and/or operations. We only acquire properties that are absolutely necessary for projects; we certainly don’t want to take more than is needed, because we know that doesn’t make our neighbourhoods better. We take every effort to minimize the footprint of land required through careful planning and design work. As we refine our plans for the project, we’re getting a clearer picture of the properties we’ll need to make this project a reality. Outreach to property owners in some areas has already begun.

Is the transit corridor buffer a permanent encumbrance on private property or will it only last for the duration of construction?

The transit corridor land designation applies to the planning, design and construction phases of a priority transit project and will be removed from the property title once those phases are complete and the line is in operation (i.e. after construction).

What compensation for owners of property on which there is a transit corridor buffer?

Similar to other types of notices that appear on title, the notice of transit corridor land designation is strictly meant to be informational. The notice doesn’t prevent you from selling or leasing your property and it’s similar to other notices that commonly appear on property titles, like for properties within an airport zone.

Compensation would apply in cases where a property would need to be acquired for transit construction. Whether we have to acquire a portion of your property or your entire property, you will be compensated at fair market value.

Would like to have exact dates as to when Metrolinx plans to have talks with Corktown, King East, businesses, and property owners regarding street closures.

Building a subway through such a densely populated urban area is a challenge, but we’re committed to keeping people moving during construction. Our top priority is maintaining safe access for all.

As we advance towards early works beginning at Corktown in fall 2021 and construction beginning in the downtown and west segments of the Ontario Line in 2023, we’ll be working with communities, local BIAs, elected officials and the TTC on plans to maintain safe access to local stores and businesses with robust safety measures and frequent communication.

These plans will involve avoiding or minimizing impacts to existing transit services as much as possible, communicating early and often about any temporary impacts to roadways and transit lines, looking at other projects that may be taking place to see how they might affect our plans, and ensuring communications about any changes are clear and highly visible across many different channels.

What will be the process for community consultation with respect to the station design Terms of Reference?

Stations will be designed with the community in mind, using a set of guidelines that will make sure they are attractive and fit into the areas they will serve.

We’ll be looking for opportunities throughout the planning and design process to get public feedback on design elements. We look forward to working with community members and the City of Toronto on how to design Ontario Line stations that communities will be proud of.

Why it is limited to 160 characters again after last week 300 characters limit?

As a result of feedback we received, we updated our method of question submission for virtual open houses in time for the East Segment Virtual Open House on June 24th 2021. Participants are now able to submit longer questions.

What is the service level agreement Mx makes for responding to email and or phone messages?

The Ontario Line Community Relations team is dedicated to getting back to residents and stakeholders on their inquiries and concerns as soon as possible. Sometimes this can take longer in order to check in with the project and technical teams and provide the most accurate and up-to-date information to the person inquiring or resolving any issues that are raised.

Why Moss Park and Corktown station only have 1 entrance building? TTC has been adding 2nd entrance to a lot of its old stations for safety and access reasons.

We have modelled the stations to make sure there are adequate life safety entrances. Where we only have one entrance, we also have emergency exits being built in. We have accessibility and redundancy with escalators and two elevators, and we’ve done the work to make sure the stations are safe in the event of emergency.

One of the advantages of building new stations is that we can design them to optimize the pedestrian flow and ridership. We can also try to minimize the footprint of the station buildings. Moss Park, being in a park, is one example where we want to minimize the permanent footprint, like Osgoode. Where we are not interacting with an existing station, we can design the station in such a way that the single headhouse/entrance has everything you need.

Will there be any crossover, storage track in Downtown between King/Bathurst and Corktown? If there is, where? What extra impact will we see at those locations?

The crossover is required for service resiliency and is currently planned for just east of Queen Station. Every attempt and consideration has been taken to minimize the impact to surrounding area.

How is the work from home trend in the downtown financial district expected to impact the ridership/usership at Osgoode?

According to our most recent modelling, we have projected the following ridership numbers for Osgoode Station by the year 2041:

  • 16,500 people within walking distance to station
  • 12,100 customers will use the station during the busiest travel hour
  • 5,700 Line 1 transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 1,000 surface transfers during the busiest travel hour
  • 110,500 jobs in the area

You can also find these projections here on our website

Can Osgoode Station be connected to the PATH network as part of this project?

We appreciate the suggestion and will pass it on to our project teams to determine if there’s an opportunity to protect for a possible future connection between Osgoode Station and the PATH network.

Isn’t there a station partially dug at Yonge from an earlier subway project?

Yes, the current plan takes advantage of space that was dug for an east-west line when TTC’s Queen Station was built for Toronto in the early 1950s. You can learn more about this here.

Why isn't Osgoode station nestled into the Four Seasons concert space instead of open, public, green space?

Why would you need to destroy part of the beautiful Osgoode Hall lawn and trees? This is a terrible idea. Why do you need to have more than the existing station at Osgoode?

How was the decision made to build a station on the Osgoode Hall heritage property? What other options were explored?

The TTC’s entrances for the existing Line 1 Osgoode Station do not provide sufficient capacity for the ridership expected when the Ontario Line is in operation.

We also looked at various other location options for the Ontario Line Osgoode Station entrance buildings in this area. The proposed locations are the only ones where we can construct the station entrances and meet the necessary safety and code requirements.

We always strive to reduce or avoid impacts to these kinds of properties wherever possible. They’re so important to the fabric of the city, and we know we need to do everything we can to preserve our stock of older buildings. Heritage properties are unique – depending on the recognition status, there are different requirements we must meet if we need to change these kinds of properties to accommodate new transit projects. We will continue to work with cultural heritage specialists and the City of Toronto’s heritage preservation services to minimize impacts to heritage buildings.

Will there be an underground connection into 180 Queen Street West? (NW corner of Queen and University). Large number of commercial office workers.

Currently there is no planned tunnel connection to 180 Queen Street West, but we thank you for sharing this suggestion.

What is the timeline for the contracts for demolition, staging, etc. for the Phase 1 and Phase 2 Corktown sites?

The contract for early works for the Corktown station area are to be awarded in fall 2021 and will include preparatory works such as demolition to allow for archaeological investigations to proceed.

For major construction, the contract for the South Civils, Station and Tunnel package is currently in market and anticipated to close in mid-2022.

You can learn more about the procurement process for the Ontario Line here.

What is estimated completion of project at Corktown?

The construction schedule for the Ontario Line, including for stations such as Corktown, will be determined in conjunction with the successful bidder for the South Civils contract of the Ontario Line. You can learn more about the procurement process for the Ontario Line here.

Will Parliament Square Park be preserved? I heard Gov ON wants to build 5 condo buildings above Corktown station that it spans over Parliament Square park.

Our priority is always to avoid impacts to park and green spaces that we know communities rely on.

We’re happy to say that Parliament Square Park will be protected during construction and will be around for years to come following the opening of the Ontario Line.

Will the developments/stations at Queen and Spadina respect the existing build height restrictions?

How will the design of the new buildings at Queen & Spadina adhere to the Heritage Conservation District Plan for Queen West (Part V, Ontario Heritage Act)?

Please note that the transit-oriented communities (TOC) program is led by the Province of Ontario and does not fall under Metrolinx’s purview.

Work towards a proposed transit-oriented community at Queen-Spadina is ongoing with the City of Toronto. Following City review, the province will initiate a community engagement process giving people an opportunity to help shape these vibrant communities. This process is anticipated to begin in Winter 2021.

You can find more information about the Ontario Line Queen-Spadina Station on our website under the West Segment Neighbourhood Update section.

Will Metrolinx, Infrastructure Ontario, & the Province commit here, yes or no, to not using MZOs at all TOC sites? Work w/ Toronto instead of overpowering them.

The transit-oriented communities (TOC) program is led by the Province of Ontario and does not fall under Metrolinx’s purview.

How many residential units are currently being proposed to be built as part of the Corktown Ontario Line station? Are any non-market housing?

There are plans for 5 towers on the First Parliament site. Build the Corktown station (as per your mandate) and return the remainder to the city. Land Grab?

Please note that the transit-oriented communities (TOC) program is led by the Province of Ontario and does not fall under Metrolinx’s purview.

The Province is working with the City of Toronto to develop a public engagement process with the intention of beginning this important dialogue with the community in Fall 2021.

You can learn more about the proposal here.

The section west of Corktown is tunnelled by TBM. So how will the tunnel between Corktown and Don Yard be constructed? Cut and Cover? Another TBM? Other method?

Tunnelling will head from the Corktown station site towards the Don Yard to construct the tunnel in this area. Just west of Cherry Street, the tunnels would enter the GO corridor (beneath the GO track) through tunnel portals that would be constructed for the trains to exit on the north side of the GO tracks in the Don Yard area.

Meet the Speakers

Photo of Richard Tucker

Richard Tucker

Ontario Line Project Director

Photo of Malcolm MacKay

Malcolm MacKay

Ontario Line Project Sponsor

Photo of Carrie Sheaffer

Carrie Sheaffer

Senior Manager, Environmental Programs and Assessment

Photo of Quang Pham

Quang Pham

Manager, Property Team

Photo of Renee Afoom-Boateng

Renee Afoom-Boateng

Senior Manager, Third Party Adjacent Works

Format &Accessibility

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