> Ontario Line LIVE - March 1, 2022 | Metrolinx Engage

Ontario Line LIVE - March 1, 2022

On March 1, 2022, Metrolinx hosted a virtual presentation and live Q&A about the Ontario Line’s draft Environmental Impact Assessment Report, focusing on Gerrard to Exhibition Stations, with over 160 live attendees. 

During the virtual open house, we answered top-voted questions submitted by registrants, as well as live questions from participants using a call-in option. Participants asked a variety of questions related to the report, plans for stations, noise and vibration, property impacts, business supports and more. We’ll be posting responses to questions on this page as soon as possible.

For those who weren’t able to join us, you’ll find the video recording below. We’re looking forward to holding many more meetings in the future.

Call-In With Your Question

As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we are adding a call-in option for tonight’s event. To ask your question by voice, join the Zoom meeting here. We aim to keep each question and subsequent answer to 3 minutes allowing for as many call-in questions as possible.

NOTE: please ensure you have the latest version of Zoom installed.

Join Zoom

Agenda

6:30PM: Meeting Begins/Opening Remark

6:35PM: Presentation: EIAR (Gerrard to Exhibition Stations)

7:15PM : Questions and Answers (pre-submitted questions)

7:35PM: Questions and Answers (call-in questions via Zoom)

7:55PM: Wrap up and Closing Remarks

Meet the Speakers

Photo of Malcolm MacKay

Malcolm MacKay

Program Sponsor, Ontario Line

Photo of James Francis

James Francis

Senior Manager, Environmental Programs and Assessment

Jesse Pakkala

Jesse Pakkala

Project Manager, Environmental Programs and Assessment

Vicki Wong

Vicki Wong

Director, Property Acquisitions

Photo of Richard Tucker

Richard Tucker

Vice President, Subway Project Delivery, Ontario Line

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

Comment Sort

  • Sort questions:
  • Date
  • Popularity

Comments

Anonymous's avatar
Feb 27, 2022 - 11:58

The station location in the lawn of Osgoode Hall is egregious, and the notes in the report clearly identify these impacts. Why is the station not located in the boulevard on University Avenue? According to comments made at the Toronto Preservation Board meeting in January, the whole station could have been located in the redeveloped 250 University Avenue, but this option was rejected by Metrolinx. Why?

  • Vote for this question12
  • Downvote this question1
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:29

We appreciate your feedback regarding the station location at Osgoode Hall. While our preferred approach is always to avoid impacts where possible, we acknowledge that there will be impacts to heritage resources as a result of the Ontario Line project.

We understand the Osgoode Hall location has local, provincial and national heritage significance However, construction requirements associated with the future Osgoode Station and required connection with the existing Line 1 infrastructure requires use of this property.  

Building a subway through such a densely populated urban area is a challenge. The TTC’s entrances for the existing Line 1 Osgoode Station do not provide sufficient capacity for the ridership expected when the Ontario Line is in operation. 

We also looked at various other location options for the Ontario Line Osgoode Station entrance buildings in this area, including 250 University Avenue. Please note that the existing foundation at 250 University does not allow for the station entrance structure to be constructed at this site. The proposed locations are the only ones where we can construct the station entrances and meet the necessary safety requirements.  

We are working closely with the City of Toronto, Osgoode Hall tenants, and other key stakeholders to reduce impacts and mitigate those that are unavoidable through sensitive design and minimization of the staging area and construction footprint.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Feb 24, 2022 - 20:38

I would like a definitive answer (YES of NO), will there be any transit oriented development on top of the operation, maintenance, and storage facility? Who is responsible for this? When can I see open houses or presentation on it?

  • Vote for this question8
  • Downvote this question1
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:10

Please note that a transit-oriented community (TOC) development has not been announced for the Thorncliffe Park area to date. 

Infrastructure Ontario leads the TOC program. You can find out more about previously announced TOCs for the Ontario Line and get in touch with Infrastructure Ontario at engageio.ca.  

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

The draft Heritage study identifies several properties to be demolished, and many that are anticipated to have vibration impacts. As Queen Street is the first street laid out in Toronto its heritage significance exceeds the buildings along it. It's unique character and building stock supports many wonderful small businesses, restaurants and tourism, particularly the section between University Avenue and Bathurst Street. If the premise is that the Ontario Line will be financed by redevelopment along its corridor, how much redevelopment and in what locations is anticipated?

  • Vote for this question5
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:20

We always strive to reduce or avoid impacts to these kinds of properties because we know how important they are to the fabric of the city, and we know we need to do everything we can to preserve the historic character of our neighbourhoods. Making room for new transit infrastructure in a dense, urban environment does mean that some existing buildings will be impacted, but it’s our job to keep those impacts to a minimum.

If we can’t avoid certain impacts, we work with heritage specialists to see how we can reuse or incorporate heritage features, including exterior facades of buildings, and how we can commemorate their significance with permanent plaques or signs.

Infrastructure Ontario (IO) is currently in the process of developing transit-oriented communities (TOC) proposals across the Ontario Line, including around Queen-Spadina Station. These communities provide significant benefits to their respective regions, including increased retail space, additional residential units, and faster connections to transit. For more information on the TOC, please visit IO’s website at engageio.ca.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Feb 27, 2022 - 12:01

It is not clear what is planned for the area north of Fort York where the current Garrison Crossing Bridges are located. Land is being acquired here? For what purpose?

  • Vote for this question4
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:15

Plans are to preserve Garrison Crossing, the pedestrian bridge that spans the rail corridors in the area and connects with the future Ordnance Park site. While there may be times when it will be closed due to construction work, Metrolinx is studying ways to minimize impacts and maintain pedestrian and cycling access across the rail corridors for the duration of the project. 

In the short term, a portion of the Ordnance Park site will be needed to support the construction of an emergency exit building. After construction is finished and the equipment is gone, an opportunity to create a new park on the land above the tunnel will be available for City of Toronto programming, in keeping with their existing plans for the site.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

As a member if the local supplier community we are interested in learning a bit more about project timelines as it relates to design, procurement and construction.

  • Vote for this question7
  • Downvote this question4
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:05

Project timelines in relation to procurement can be found here.   

There will be three separate Public-Private partnership (P3) contracts procured for the Ontario Line to maximize participation and competition from the market and ensure the success of the project. Creating three separate contracts makes the size and risk of the packages more manageable and removes the need for one consortium to consist of multiple, specialized skillsets (e.g., vehicle provider and tunnel contractor) that would make forming integrated project companies more difficult.  

The Rolling Stock, Systems, Operations and Maintenance (RSSOM) package is a 30-year-term contract to design-build-finance-operate-maintain the entire Ontario Line.  

The Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnels package is a design-build-finance contract for the southern segment of the Ontario Line, from Exhibition/Ontario Place to the Don Yard portal (west of the Don River).  

The Northern Civil, Stations and Tunnels package is a design-build-finance contract for the northern segment of the Ontario Line, from Gerrard Station to the Ontario Science Centre.  

In advance of these contracts, Metrolinx will also break ground on a package of early works that will be traditionally procured. These will include upgrading existing bridges, building new bridges, expanding the rail corridor, installing some station infrastructure, and relocating utilities for parts of the line that are shared by the GO rail corridor. 

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Feb 27, 2022 - 11:59

Richmond Street already has very high densities along its length and offers an easier place to develop the line than Queen Street. Why was Richmond not chosen as a route for the Ontario Line?

  • Vote for this question3
  • Downvote this question1
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 11, 2022 - 19:22

When developing the business case for the Ontario Line project, there were multiple evaluation criteria when selecting the preferred alignment. These criteria included building strong connections by improving access to transit and economic opportunities. Upon review, it was understood that the Queen Street option allowed for easier connections and transfers with Line 1 at Queen and Osgoode. This would in turn provide additional relief to Line 1 and therefore build strong connections at this location.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 1, 2022 - 18:06

Riverside-Leslieville is facing early works construction beginning as early as September. What will happen to our parks during construction on the corridor? Jimmie Simpson Park, McCleary Park, Bruce MacKay Park, Tiverton Parkette. Will they remain open and how will you ensure the safety of children in playgrounds and others using sports facilities?

  • Vote for this question2
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:36

Providing ongoing access to beloved community park space is a top priority for us as we deliver this important project.

We know that spaces where we can relax and unwind and children can play are vital in communities, and we are committed to working with our community partners to ensure there is continued access to park and playground space as we deliver better, faster and easier transit.

If we do need to temporarily occupy some park space to support construction and avoid impacts to nearby homes and businesses, we will work with the city to ensure that it is thoughtfully restored once the project is finished. In fact, McCleary playground, Bruce Mackey Park, Jimmie Simpson Park and Gerrard-Carlaw Parkette and dog park will be larger following Ontario Line construction.

During construction, the safety of park spaces will be a top priority and regular communication and safety measures will be in place to keep the community and park visitors safe.   

We will also work with contractors to preserve surrounding vegetation in areas where we are working. Metrolinx’s Vegetation Guideline protocol reflects a landscape science-based approach to restoring greenspace that meets or exceeds bylaws and regulations. We will strive to keep tree removal to a bare minimum and will also take the opportunity to remove invasive foliage.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Feb 23, 2022 - 14:33

What are the plans and designs for sound barriers south of Corktown Common and the Canary District?

  • Vote for this question3
  • Downvote this question2
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 29, 2022 - 15:08

Sound barriers are proposed between the future development near 125R Mill Street and TDSB owned lands to the east (south of Mill Street, roughly between Tannery Road and Bayview Avenue). No sound barriers are proposed along the Toronto Region and Conservation Authority’s Flood Protection Landform, in order to ensure the integrity of this feature.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Feb 23, 2022 - 16:43

1. Regarding the tower at the southwest corner of King and Parliament— has the height been lowered?
2. When is it expected that further construction briefing will be shared with the Corktown community?
3. Still waiting to hear the results of the heritage poll taken?

  • Vote for this question2
  • Downvote this question1
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:08

The entrance building for Corktown Station will be built on the southeast corner of King Street East and Berkeley Street. We do not anticipate the station entrance building being exceptionally tall and look forward to sharing design concepts with the community once available. 

If you are referring to the proposed transit-oriented communities (TOC) development south of Front Street, we kindly encourage you to contact Infrastructure Ontario via engageio.ca. Infrastructure Ontario is leading the TOC program. 

We are always available to answer questions about construction plans and welcome questions at [email protected] or 416-202-5100. We are also working to establish Community Liaison Committees across the Ontario Line as we get closer to construction. To stay updated on project milestones and new engagement opportunities, you may wish to sign up for our weekly newsletter (you can unsubscribe at any time). 

We appreciate the feedback received during the First Parliament Heritage Interpretation and Commemoration consultation, which ended in December. We are currently working with a heritage commemoration expert and look forward to sharing the survey results with the community soon.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Feb 25, 2022 - 08:10

Why wouldn't you extend the line to Etobicoke within the rail corridor to serve Humber Bay Shores area instead of the unnecessary proposed Park Lawn Go Station. It makes much more sense to have a subway access in the area, with the increasing high rise condos, rather than Go with the nearby Exhibition and Mimico stations anyway. Right now, the only way to go to downtown is a very long slow ride on the 501 streetcar or a bus ride to old mills, line 2 ride followed by line 1 ride ,,, both options can add up to 1 hour to reach downtown.

  • Vote for this question2
  • Downvote this question1
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:15

While not part of the scope of the project, our plans protect for the possibility of expanding both ends of the line in the future to improve transit access and meet demand. 

Tail tracks, west of Exhibition Station and north of Science Centre Station, will provide space for the storage of vehicles and protect for future expansion. 

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:32

We will do everything we can to work with our contractors to ensure communities stay peaceful and quiet both during construction and operations.   

During construction, we’ll continuously monitor noise levels and use tools like equipment silencers and temporary noise barriers to keep things as quiet as possible.   

Once in operation, Ontario Line trains will be electric, meaning not only will they be clean and fast, but quiet too. We’ll also use other sound-reducing tools in certain areas to keep future operations quiet and unobtrusive and to ensure the Ontario Line doesn’t result in noise and vibration levels that are significantly different than they are today.

Metrolinx has also created immersive sound demonstrations for the Ontario Line to better inform residents what noise level to expect once the line is operational, which you can find at ontariolinesoundstudio.ca

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Based on the Oct. 21/2013 amendment, which"class area" is Metrolinx using for the above ground section?

If Metrolinx is aligning with the new "class 4 area" / 60 dba during the day and 55 dba during the night, as per the Environmental Assessment, then the NPC 300 allows a 10 dba reduction to the established limit for class 4.

"In a condition where there is a min. 40 trains passing the point of reception in day time from 7:00 to 23:00, and a min. of 20 trains passing during the night 23:00 to 7:00, then the daytime and nighttime average sound level from rail activity, LESS 10 dba can be added to the limit that otherwise apply.
So 60 dba less 10 dba = 50 dba during the day and 55 dba less 10 dba during the night = 45 dba

I demand that Metrolinx confirms that they will apply the noise reduction of 10 dba or provide substantial evidence that this reduction does not apply.

Reference: NPC 300 review by HGC Engineering "Ear to the Ground" article by Rob Stevens.

  • Vote for this question2
  • Downvote this question1
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 11, 2022 - 19:24

NPC-300 is a Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks noise guideline. It is applicable to stationary noise impacts (e.g. facilities) and land-use planning. NPC-300 is being applied to the Ontario Line maintenance and storage facility (OMSF) and stations, as they are stationary sources of noise.  However, NPC-300 is not applicable to rail transit projects – thus consideration for “class 4” is not an applicable application of the MECP guideline.

For application of NPC-300 to the applicable OMSF and stations, Metrolinx is using Class 1 exclusionary limits in their environmental noise assessment, as per Section 5.2.1 of the Draft Noise and Vibration Report. This is substantiated since baseline noise monitoring in the area showed higher background levels than the Class 1 limits.

Adoption of NPC-300 Class 4 is only applicable to existing facilities that have encroaching development that would put them out of compliance.  Since all development considered around the OMSF and Stations is existing, Class 4 limits had not been considered. Further assessment to the Class 1 limits would be considered more conservative, as they are lower than Class 4.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Mar 1, 2022 - 18:36

Given what we have all seen on Eglington to previously thriving businesses, what has been postulated to ensure this won't happen to the Queen Street West area.

  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question0
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:22

We’re committed to ensuring local businesses remain accessible and successful throughout this important project.

We’ll work with the business community to provide customized, tailored supports, from making sure store fronts are clear and easy to access, to working together on promotions and shop-local incentives, to helping them relocate to other nearby locations if their properties are needed to support construction.

We are also opening community offices along the route, with community engagement staff available during business hours to answer questions, provide updates and help support local businesses and organizations through construction.

During construction, we will have a 24-hour hotline that will give the community direct access to someone who will listen to their concerns and help address any issues.

This will be an ongoing process, and we are committed to keeping an open, two-way dialogue going so we can continuously strengthen and improve our supports for local businesses.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
  • Vote for this question2
  • Downvote this question2
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:06

We understand that residents and businesses want those details and we will reach out to impacted property owners at the earliest opportunity. If Metrolinx confirms that a property is needed to support construction or operation of the project, the property owner will receive written notification from us informing them that this is case. 

After that, Metrolinx will arrange to meet with the property owner to answer any questions they may have, including how much property is needed and why, how the acquisition process works, and expected timelines. Multiple meetings will take place throughout the property acquisition process to ensure property owners have the information and support they need. 

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question2
Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 20, 2022 - 14:06

Ontario Line tunnels in the King/Bathurst area will run about 30-36 metres below ground level. 

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0