> Ontario Line LIVE - February 22, 2022 | Metrolinx Engage

Ontario Line LIVE - February 22, 2022

On February 22, 2022, Metrolinx hosted a virtual presentation and live Q&A about the Ontario Line’s draft Environmental Impact Assessment Report, focusing on Science Centre to Gerrard Stations, with over 180 live attendees.

During the virtual open house, we answered top-voted questions submitted by registrants, as well as live questions from participants using a call-in option. Participants asked a variety of questions related to the report, noise and vibration, property impacts, project plans, environmental conservation and more. We’ll be posting responses to questions on this page as soon as possible.

For those who weren’t able to join us, you’ll find the video recording below. We’re looking forward to holding many more meetings in the future.

 

Call-In With Your Question

As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we are adding a call-in option for tonight’s event. To ask your question by voice, join the Zoom meeting here. We aim to keep each question and subsequent answer to 3 minutes allowing for as many call-in questions as possible.

NOTE: please ensure you have the latest version of Zoom installed.

Join Zoom

Agenda

6:30PM: Meeting Begins/Opening Remark

6:35PM: Presentation: EIAR (Science Centre to Gerrard Stations)

7:15PM : Questions and Answers (pre-submitted questions)

7:35PM: Questions and Answers (call-in questions via Zoom)

7:55PM: Wrap up and Closing Remarks

Meet the Speakers

Photo of Malcolm MacKay

Malcolm MacKay

Program Sponsor, Ontario Line

Photo of James Francis

James Francis

Senior Manager, Environmental Programs and Assessment

Jesse Pakkala

Jesse Pakkala

Project Manager, Environmental Programs and Assessment

Vicki Wong

Vicki Wong

Director, Property Acquisitions

Photo of Richard Tucker

Richard Tucker

Vice President, Subway Project Delivery, Ontario Line

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar

I am interested in how vibration and noise will effect homes in this area on either side of the tunnel.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 11, 2022 - 11:13

The first steps in reducing impacts from noise and vibration starts at the source – with the train and track. 

When the Ontario Line trains are running, they will be electrified, which means they will be quiet, in addition to clean and fast.  

We will be installing noise walls on both sides of the joint corridor through Leslieville and Riverside that will result in noise levels that are no higher or even lower than they are today at the majority of locations. The noise walls will be at least five metres high and extend from approximately Eastern Avenue to east of Pape Avenue. 

We will also introduce proven solutions to address any increases in vibration. These could include rubber mats placed under the track structures for GO trains and specialized fasteners for the rails. We’ll confirm the exact solutions we’ll put in place once we have a project partner on board for the Northern Civil, Stations and Tunnel project and we complete detailed designs for this work. 

During construction, we’ll have options including construction equipment silencers and muffling devices and other methods that minimize vibrations. We’ll also schedule construction so that noisy work happens when it makes the most sense. 

Regarding the Pape tunnel, tunnel depth is determined by current infrastructure. Being that Pape will be an interchange station with the TTC, the top of the tunnel will be 30 meters underground. 

If you would like to learn more about noise and vibration, please view the draft Environmental Impact Assessment Report here

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Anonymous's avatar

The health impacts associated with environmental noise are both acute and chronic in nature. In addition to noise-induced hearing loss, there is growing body of evidence that shows an association between environmental noise and health impacts including cardiovascular disease cognitive impairment in adults and children, sleep disturbance and mental health impacts. Emerging evidence suggests that exposure to environmental noise could lead to adverse pulmonary effects increased mortality from diabetes, and negative impact on behaviour in children. (Reference: Toronto Public Health. How Loud is Too Loud? Health Impacts of Environmental Noise in Toronto. Technical Report. April 2017) Additionally, the World Health Organization and the Ministry of the Environment
Given the impact on auditory and non-auditory health, what will Metrolinx do to ensure that those decibel levels do not exceed either of the daytime and night-time noise thresholds of 55 dBA and 50 dBA respectively?
Additional Background Info: Recommended safe noise exposure levels depend on which adverse noise effect is being considered. To prevent hearing loss, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) adjusted the U.S. occupational recommended exposure level of 85 A-weighted decibels for additional exposure time to calculate a 70 decibel time weighted average (TWA) exposure level. EPA did not adjust for lifespan years so the correct safe exposure level is likely lower. The World Health Organization (WHO) also recommends 70 decibels to prevent hearing loss. EPA and WHO determined that non-auditory health impacts of noise occur at 55 decibels TWA, with annoyance starting at 45 decibels. These are the safe noise exposure levels for the public.

The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 141, 3731 (2017); https://doi.org/10.1121/1.4988188

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 11:54

Potential for exceedances will be addressed by implementing appropriate mitigation measures and through development and implementation of a plan to manage construction noise before construction begins. Metrolinx also intends to use localized noise barriers for specific equipment and operations. You can find more details about mitigations for noise in Appendix K of the Noise and Vibration section of the draft Environmental Impact Assessment Report here.

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Anonymous's avatar

When the easement is for under the home what does that mean in practice?
When compensation is negotiated how is it determined and what precisely is it compensating for?
Does it mean a limit on renovations or construction projects on the property itself?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 9, 2022 - 12:27

An easement is the right of use, not ownershipBelow grade easements are not excavated as part of tunnel construction. These may include, but are not limited to, easements around a tunnel or around an underground structure.

When property easement acquisitions are unavoidable, Metrolinx will work with property owners to negotiate mutually beneficial agreements to acquire the required property easement.  Whenever Metrolinx needs to acquire property easements, property owners can expect to be compensated at fair market value, as determined by a third-party appraiser.

Metrolinx will enlist the services of a third-party appraisal expert to estimate the unbiased value of the property easement. Market factors at the time of the easement acquisition will inform the valuation and will be based on comparable sales of similar easements in similar locations and situations.

Further details regarding subsurface easements can be discussed with our property team during negotiations. 

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Anonymous's avatar

The city of Toronto has VisionZero. Seeing that Hopedale Ave is a VERY popular biking and pedestrian route and there are lots of families that use it to walk and play, how can you have construction vehicles coming in and out multiple times during the day and ensure that cyclist and pedestrian injuries and deaths won't happen?
Same goes with the city (and the federal government's) and their ravine strategy. Putting a train bridge in and over a ravine and likely decimating the trees in Crowthers woods seems to go against the city's ravine strategy AND the federal funding conditions.
How would your plans work with these 2 strategies.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 12:19

The Ontario Line supports VisionZero by increasing critical transit connections which will decrease vehicular traffic and improve public transit access in core areas of the city. Metrolinx has committed to the development of a construction traffic management plan which will detail the approach to maintaining safe pedestrians and cyclists through the area.  

Regarding the Don Valley crossing, the bridge emerging from the southern bank of the Don Valley at Minton Place and connecting to Thorncliffe Park will be constructed using modern techniques and design principles to minimize the environmental impacts of the structure. Project plans necessitate a need to cross the valley via a bridge, as tunnelling underneath it is not a feasible option. 

Due to the geography in this area, we would need to tunnel so deeply that the long journeys between street and platform levels would result in fewer customers taking transit. To get under the Don Valley by the Leaside Bridge and an offshoot of the valley that wraps around Thorncliffe Park, we would have to tunnel as deep as 70 metres underground – deeper than any station in Toronto’s transit network, and deeper than a 20-storey building is tall. The very long descent customers would have to take to get to and from the street could add a significant amount of extra time to their commutes – more than eight minutes – and ultimately discourage them from using the Ontario Line. The Ontario Line also needs to connect with the above-ground maintenance and storage facility in Thorncliffe Park. 

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Nicholas Argyropoulos's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 09:38

What are the consequences to property owners on Pape Avenue of vibrational and other impacts from the work done as a result of the Environmental Impact and Assessment Report or from any other work done from this operation.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 14:00

Impacts along Pape Avenue may vary. Residents commonly have questions about noise and vibration during both construction and operation of the Ontario Line. You can find more information and a detailed understanding of the impacts and Metrolinx’ plans to mitigate these impacts in the Noise and Vibration section of the draft EIAR (Environmental Impact Assessment Report). We have also released a sound demonstration that models expected noise levels for the project in various locations in this area, which you can find here on our website.

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Anonymous's avatar

The speed factor is assumed to be 20 dB, from the reference speed of 80 km/h. • The Minton Place Portal is considered as a point source resulting in a sound pressure 4 dB higher than the related tracks, at a distance of 25 m from the portal (per Eglinton Crosstown LRT project (J.E. Coulter, 2010)). • For each track direction, 496 trains travel between 07:00 and 23:00 (daytime), and 81 trains travel between 23:00 and 07:00 (nighttime), based on service levels in Appendix M and OMSF operational data for the pre-service hour (05:00 to 06:00).

QUESTION: This sounds like there will be a constant sound/noise of 80 dBA. Given that noise carries over valleys, and that Toronto residents encountered this problem when the subway was created over the Bloor Via Duct, why has there not been consideration of covering the train as done for the residents of Rosedale? This should be included to mitigate sound and noise, and to ensure quality of life for residents around portals and along the Don Valley. Will this be done?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 11:56

Metrolinx explored the best possible mitigation measures for noise levels at the Don Valley. Based on our research and the source sound of the vehicles (trains), an enclosure was not pursued. The Ontario Line trains are quieter than existing road traffic and automated and Metrolinx is working closely with regulators to ensure the noise from trains integrate with existing noise levels. 

You can also find a sound demonstration here on our website for Minton Place.

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Anonymous's avatar

The EA asserts that emissions from the Ontarioline will be offset by reduction of air pollution created by private vehicles. What comparables from other projects have been used that show a marked decline in vehicle emissions due to an increase in transit ridership? In addition to construction air pollution, there will be added emissions from transit vehicles serving the new Cosburn station. How will all this air pollution - which dangerously affects the health of "Receptors" ( as the EA terms the residences ) be mitigated and monitored ?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 12:03

By allowing people to leave their cars at home and take transit instead, the Ontario line will be an environmentally–friendly travel option that helps protect air quality. In above-ground sections of the line, the electric-powered Ontario Line trains will also ensure no additional emissions are introduced to the local community. Please note that the Ontario Line's Cosburn Station will be underground.

We anticipate that the Ontario Line will result in 28,000 fewer vehicles on the road daily when fully operational. You can find more details in the project's Preliminary Design Business Case (see page 85 for the Benefit Analysis).

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Anonymous's avatar

I live on Pape Ave , east side two and half blocks south of Danforth. This house sits on Sand and the water table is about ten to 20 inches below
the basement floor. I know because i have dug beneath the basement floor.
If i were to get an engineers assessment on the present condition of the house foundation and basement walls would metrolinx pay for it. A
baseline that establishes the condition of these house parts before subway construction.
Thank You from Mike Jackson
email--> [email protected],com

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 11, 2022 - 18:51

If given access to a property where a property interest is required, such as a subsurface easement, Metrolinx will carry out a pre-condition survey. Please contact us directly at [email protected] or 416-202-5100 for further details.

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Anonymous's avatar

We live in the zone OHN-021, for which the border traces a line around our property at 83 Gough Ave. We see that the parking lot immediately behind our home (lot address is 716 Pape Ave) will be used as a construction staging area, which compels us to ask three questions:

1) Do you anticipate that the laneway running N-S behind 81 & 83 Gough Ave will be blocked at any point and what are the plans to accommodate right of access for the residents who use the laneway to access our parking garages and property? This is our only access to our parking.

2) What will the approximate timing be of the move-in/move-out for the construction staging area in this lot at 716 Pape?

3) The parking lot has been encircled in a purple line in the report, which indicates "Built Heritage Resource / Cultural Heritage Landscape." Does this mean that a park will be built in this area upon completion of the transit line?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 11, 2022 - 18:58
  1. Access to lane will be maintained throughout construction.
  2. Construction will occur between 2024 and 2027.
  3. Regarding the Built Heritage Resource (BHR)/ Cultural Heritage Landscape (CHL) indication in the report, this does not indicate future park space. This area will be used as a temporary staging location during construction, and we do not currently have plans to permanently change this feature. Built heritage resources (BHRs) and cultural heritage landscapes (CHLs) are aspects of the environment that provide insight or information on past human use of the landscape that are visible to the human eye, and include buildings, landscapes, and vegetation. The purple encircling the lot means there is potential for BHR/CHL.
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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 07:35

the EA outlined project footprints within the OL Map on the initial Metrolinx Engagement page. Why is there such an irregular area within the valley (west of DVP/East of River) that is coloured as "project footprint"? there is also a much larger area on the West side of River, again, why is the project footprint so large, is the area on the west side an equipment staging area? How is MX getting equipment into the valley?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 12:26

Regarding the project footprint in the draft EIAR, we have determined that this is the maximum amount of space needed to safely accommodate construction work, which also includes staging and laydown areas where equipment and materials are stored and prepared during construction of nearby structures. 

We try to minimize our construction footprints as much as possible, taking safety and spacing considerations into account for each site. How we use these areas will vary and may change over the duration of the project, and contracts will include incentives for future project partners to reduce construction footprints as much as possible. We will be sure to provide clear communications about any property needs and traffic impacts as the project evolves. 

Please note that the precise construction means and methods will be developed with the Project Constructor who is delivering the project once they are onboard. We anticipate selecting a Project Constructor for this area in 2024. 

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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 12:40

Is there a possibility that a future Phase 2 will begin construction before 2029 (when the Ontario line is supposed to open). Is Metrolinx working on a phase 2 behind the scenes? Thanks

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 13:09

Our plans protect for the possibility of expanding the line in the future to improve transit access and meet demand, but this is not part of the current project’s scope. 

Tail tracks at each terminus station, Exhibition and Science Centre Stations, will provide space for the storage of vehicles and protect for future expansion. 

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Anonymous's avatar

As stated in the EIAR: Vegetation removal will be reduced to the extent possible and limited to the Metrolinx right-of-way. • An IVM Plan will be developed and implemented that is in adherence with the Metrolinx Vegetation Guideline (2020) and the IVM Program.
When Metrolinx refers to compensation for the number of trees and vegetation that will be destroyed at the portal on Minton, ET Seaton park and Crothers Woods (an environmentally sensitive area). How will the compensation be determined? Given the environmental sensitivity of the Don Valley, how will you protect and preserve trees that do not need to be removed?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 12:08

Metrolinx will establish Tree Protection Zone (TPZ) fencing to protect and prevent tree injuries. TPZs will be clearly staked prior to construction using barriers in accordance with local bylaw. Vegetation compensation will be determined in accordance with Metrolinx’s Vegetation Guideline (2020), which provides a landscape science-based approach that exceeds the requirements of applicable bylaws and regulations.

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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 15:20

Current ambient sound levels for Minton Place/Hopedale Ave are shown as 55 dBA for daytime and 46 dBA for nighttime. The noise levels of the two Tunnel Boring Machines, which will be in operation 24 hours per day, are shown to be as much as 74 dBA which exceed the US FTA nighttime limits of 70dBA.

Questions:
How many weeks or months will the noise levels from the Tunnel Boring Machines affect the residents of the Pape/Minton/Hopedale areas?
What further noise and vibration mitigation is Metrolinx going to introduce to reduce the noise levels of the TBM’s so that the sleep of residents of the Pape/Minton/Hopedale areas is not disturbed?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 11, 2022 - 18:53

Tunneling will occur for approximately a 10-month period. Noise will be limited to launch area at Pape Station during tunneling operations.

Metrolinx will actively monitor noise and vibration levels to ensure the expected levels outlined in the Noise and Vibration Report are maintained throughout construction (i.e. Tunnel Boring Machine (TBM) operations) at the identified receptors. The monitoring program will include warning levels prior to triggering an exceedance, to ensure that Metrolinx can adaptively manage and prevent potential noise and vibration impacts from occurring during construction. Thresholds for noise and vibration levels are more stringent at night and will be adhered to during construction to prevent disturbance to the sleep of residents. Metrolinx will provide updates on construction activities, including TBM operations, at regularly scheduled Construction Liaison Committee meetings with the community to ensure the details of TBM operations are provided in advance.

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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 15:24

It is mentioned in several locations of the EAI that "The noise emitted from trains entering and exiting the Minton Place Portal is included in this assessment”. However there is no specific study to address the operational noise levels of trains exiting and entering the Minton Pl portal and traversing the bridge over the Don Valley and the effect on the residents of Minton Place and Hopedale Ave area. Only a predictive noise and vibration software analysis using a commercially available software package is mentioned in the EIA and which conveniently predicts acceptable sound levels.
Questions:
Will Metrolinx initiate a specific study to address the noise and vibration levels at the Minton Place Portal and when will this occur?
If these noise levels are found to be excessive will Metrolinx consider further mitigation to reduce them such as a covered bridge over the Don Valley or rerouting the Ontario Line away from Minton Place?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 13:37

We will do everything we can to work with our contractors to ensure communities stay peaceful and quiet both during construction and operations.  

During construction, we’ll continuously monitor noise levels and use tools like equipment silencers and temporary noise barriers to keep things as quiet as possible.  We will ensure noisy activities occur during daytime whenever possible and plan truck routes that will minimize on-site movement and avoid travel on residential streets. Communities will be notified well in advance of any upcoming construction work, with particular attention on activities that might need to happen outside of regular hours.  

Once in operation, Ontario Line trains will be electric, meaning not only will they be clean and fast, but quiet too. We’ll also use other sound-reducing tools in certain areas to keep future operations quiet and unobtrusive and to ensure the Ontario Line doesn’t result in noise and vibration levels that are significantly different than they are today. Metrolinx has also created immersive sound demonstrations for the Ontario Line to better inform residents what noise level to expect once the line is operational, which you can find at ontariolinesoundstudio.ca

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Anonymous's avatar

The bridges at Gerrard and Carlaw already give dark, narrow pedestrian experiences, making people feel vulnerable and without even a comfortable way for someone to pass a stroller or person with a dog going the other way. How can we augment the experience for users to ensure they are safe from cars, feel comfortable with personal sidewalk space, and good lighting? This intersection also sees increasing numbers of bike riders who could be accommodated both as they ride to and through, and via safe secure bike parking perhaps similar to Pape Station.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 11, 2022 - 11:04

Plans for this area, where the Ontario Line station serving Gerrard will be located, are still being developed to ensure that impacts are minimal.  Pedestrian access will be maintained on the sidewalks and access to the new station will be simpler under revised plans, with only one entrance and one platform with trains going in both directions. This approach further minimizes impacts to the community. 

 Safety is central to everything we do, and new stations and bridges in this area are no exception. 

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Anonymous's avatar

when Mx changed the Alignment of the Yonge extension they created a very tight corner turn that diverts the train from its intended path to hook up to the existing GO rail corridor. the newly aligned tight turn is reminiscent of the original Downtown Relief Line that would have had the train cross the existing Millwood bridge. Pape residents were told that the turn the train would need to make coming down Pape, to cross the Millwood bridge would be too tight. however it appears that this is not the case for the Yonge extension? Why is a tight turn allowed for the Yonge extension and yet is not recommended for the OL?? in fact there are now 2 tight corners intended on the Yonge extension, the diversion at Royal Orchard and then the realignment to Langstaff GO.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 11, 2022 - 18:55

The Toronto Rocket vehicles currently used on the Yonge-University Line, which will also be used on the Yonge North Subway Extension (YNSE), are more articulated vehicles than what is planned for use on the Ontario Line, and as a result, they are capable of tighter track turns, as seen between Royal Orchard and Langstaff Stations.

Furthermore, the turn to align with the Millwood bridge would need to have a tighter radius than what is required for the YNSE – below the minimum standard for the proposed vehicles. This has several impacts on operations:

  1. The run time is increased due the need for the trains to slow down when navigating the corner. This makes it difficult to maintain headways and may require additional vehicles.
  2. Potential for additional noise impacts.
  3. More wear and tear on the vehicles and track.

The Millwood Bridge is not structurally sufficient to accommodate a modern subway line.

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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 15:19

We live just South and East of Pape & Danforth, and received a notice of potential expropriation a few months ago. When will we have any details concerning this and the timing of any movement by Metrolinx in this area?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 9, 2022 - 12:32

Thank you for your question. With regard to your specific property, we kindly encourage you to contact our team directly at [email protected].

You can also find more information about the project in this area on the Pape Station page on our website, and you can look up the route on our online interactive map.

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Anonymous's avatar

Has the current plan been given the official go ahead? If so, when is ground breaking for the pape to leslieville portion? How long will it take for completion? And while the line is under construction, what will be the work hours for the crews and their machinery?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 9, 2022 - 12:39

The Ontario Line project is going ahead, and preparatory work for the project is already underway at Exhibition Station and the site of the future Corktown Station.  

The delivery timelines for the Ontario Line will be confirmed through the procurement process, which you can learn more about here on our website. We currently expect that we will select a project company for this area through the procurement process in 2024. 

Work hours, and construction means and methods will be determined with the project company delivering the work, so we do not have these details at this time. 

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Anonymous's avatar

Regarding the houses above the proposed tunnel for the Ontario Line between Gerrard Square and Pape Station. How will this project affect the possible future sale by owners of those houses.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 9, 2022 - 12:36

Please note that Metrolinx cannot comment on property values, as these are influenced by a complex variety of factors beyond the control of the transit authority. 

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Anonymous's avatar

797 Don Mills Road is located at the south east corner of Don Mills and Eglinton next to the new Science Centre stop. According to your plans, the above ground tracks will be on the side walk next to the condo at 797 Don Mills Road. Only a few meters away next to the building.
I anticipate there will major noise pollution from the constant trains running from morning to night. This noise pollution will have a negative effect on the quality of life for the residents of 797 Don Mills Road. Your website mentions noise barriers to help block the sound of the trains. However noise barriers will not help as tracks are next to the condo. The noise pollution will bounce off our building and travel upwards for all the residents to hear. Can you not build the build the Science Centre stop underground? Also having the tracks above ground crossing the intersection at Don Mills and Eglinton will be major eye sore. Especially with the new community of over 10 new condo towers coming to Don Mills and Eglinton. The above ground tracks will destroy this new vibrant community. I believe this is a terrible idea and needs to be reconsidered.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 11, 2022 - 11:07

Decisions around the route and the elevation of the Ontario Line have been made with the whole network in mind, but they’re also tailored to the specific communities the line will serve. That’s why it will run in tunnels, along existing railways, and on elevated structures where it makes sense to do. 

When determining the Ontario Line’s route and elevation, planners balanced considerations like: 

  • how many people could be served, 
  • how much travel time could be saved 
  • how many connections could be made to other major rapid transit lines 
  • how quickly and effectively the line could be built 
  • how effectively any local impacts could be managed, and 
  • how to ensure the best possible use of taxpayer dollars. 

In the newer, northern part of the city where there are wide roadways and streets, the Ontario Line will run on modern, elevated structures because there’s room for them, and construction will be faster and less impactful.  

In places where there are existing rail corridors, like Leslieville, Riverside and near Exhibition place, the line will fit into an existing rail corridor, giving surrounding communities the benefits of faster and less impactful construction by avoiding complex and time-consuming tunneling and building in land we already own.  

These above-ground sections have the added benefit providing faster and easier connections to and from surface transit, because the stations aren’t deep underground. 

If there are further, unaddressed concerns from the residents of 797 Don Mills Road, we kindly encourage residents to contact us directly at [email protected]

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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 19:13

You mention that traffic will be diverted around main arteries to avoid rush hour congestion. For the Pape Station in particular - which streets do you see the traffic and construction vehicles/storage being diverted on to?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 13:45

Construction is not scheduled to begin in the area around Pape Station until approximately 2024, so we do not know the exact road closures and traffic diversions to be expected in this area during the construction period at this time.

Once we have a Project Constructor on board for this area, we will work with them to complete a Traffic Management Plan for the area. We look forward to sharing more details with the community as they are available.

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Anonymous's avatar

After the station is complete. Its a large area. Will it be sold to a developer?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 9, 2022 - 12:34

Property needs and future uses vary across the project. We are still in the early planning stages in this area, and our teams are currently focused on planning work for building the subway infrastructure. 

Whenever Metrolinx needs to acquire property to support a new transit project, our commitment is to ensure that owners and tenants do not experience a financial loss. 

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Anonymous's avatar

A presenter today mentioned that part of the goal of the line alleviate use from the TTC line one (yonge-university). Will fares be comparable to a TTC ticket? How will you ensure the line is serving all torontonians and financially accessible. How will transfers to/from the TTC line 2 (bloor-danforth) be operationalized?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 13:53

Day-to-day operations of the Ontario Line will be handled by the TTC and the fare system will be the same as TTC. As of the end of 2016, PRESTO was available on all TTC subway stations, buses and streetcars. 

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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 13, 2022 - 18:16

Is it possible to add a station at cherry street as part of the project or to design the project so that a station could be added in the future?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 11, 2022 - 11:11

When looking at the possibility of a station on Cherry Street, one of the important factors we considered was the distance between stations. If we located a station in this area, it would be very close to both Corktown and East Harbour Stations. As a result, the trains may not have enough time or distance to fully accelerate, impacting the overall time savings for travellers.  

To provide some more details on the planning process, we studied station locations with a focus on increasing access to transit, maximizing ridership, achieving travel time savings, reducing overcrowding on existing transit services and creating better access to jobs. If you want to learn more, you can read the Preliminary Design Business Case (pages 40-42 provide the overview and rationale for west stations and pages 43-45 provide an overview and rationale for downtown stations). 

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Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Feb 19, 2022 - 12:28

What will be the design speed of the trains travelling on the Ontario line? There are a lot of areas with wide station spacing so higher top speeds would speed up travel times

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 11, 2022 - 11:16

The top speed of the OL train will be 80km/hour and the average speed of 30km/hour.  

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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 18:41

You still have not provided information or diagrams on where it is going to cross over Millwood and Overlea.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 11, 2022 - 18:56

The Ontario Line crosses Millwood Road north of the intersection with Overlea Boulevard. The line does not cross Overlea Boulvard; it runs along the north side.

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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 19:22

What third party is completing these appraisals? When will they be shared with impacted property owners?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 9, 2022 - 12:35

A third-party appraisal will be completed to estimate the fair market value of a property on a case-by-case basis. A property owner may also complete their own appraisal to determine or confirm the fair market value. In some cases, other kinds of third-party experts may be asked to help determine fair market value for a property, such as environmental consultants. 

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Anonymous's avatar

How long will I be able to hear construction under my house?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 13:40

The Ontario Line tunnels are constructed as two separate “tubes” approximately 20-30 metres below ground, depending on the area, which is far deeper than the average underground TTC Station.  

Each tube is individually lined with noise dampening concrete liners, and because there is earth surrounding each tunnel, the vibrations are dampened as well. The Ontario Line is being designed and built to meet international standards for vibration control, which consider a range of sensitivities, including residences, office and commercial buildings, as well as special-purpose buildings such as concert halls, hospitals, and research and manufacturing facilities. Testing will be done before the line is operational to ensure the vehicles and tunnels are within the allowable limits for vibrations set by the City and Province of Ontario. 

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Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Feb 22, 2022 - 20:13

How soon will easements be lifted on properties that will not be affected by the construction. Will they remain in place once construction is finished and operation begins.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 9, 2022 - 12:20

Some properties and easements will only be needed temporarily, while others will be needed permanently. In some areas, we will only need slivers of properties, while in others we will need full properties.  

We have reached out to owners for every property to gauge their needs and determine next steps on a case-by-case basis. 

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Anonymous's avatar

As a member if the local supplier community we are interested in learning a bit more about project timelines as it relates to design, procurement and construction.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 11, 2022 - 11:15

Project timelines in relation to procurement can be found here.  

There will be three separate Public-Private partnership (P3) contracts procured for the Ontario Line to maximize participation and competition from the market and ensure the success of the project. Creating three separate contracts makes the size and risk of the packages more manageable and removes the need for one consortium to consist of multiple, specialized skillsets (e.g., vehicle provider and tunnel contractor) that would make forming integrated project companies more difficult. 

The Rolling Stock, Systems, Operations and Maintenance (RSSOM) package is a 30-year-term contract to design-build-finance-operate-maintain the entire Ontario Line. 

The Southern Civil, Stations and Tunnels package is a design-build-finance contract for the southern segment of the Ontario Line, from Exhibition/Ontario Place to the Don Yard portal (west of the Don River). 

The Northern Civil, Stations and Tunnels package is a design-build-finance contract for the northern segment of the Ontario Line, from Gerrard Station to the Ontario Science Centre. 

In advance of these contracts, Metrolinx will also break ground on a package of early works that will be traditionally procured. These will include upgrading existing bridges, building new bridges, expanding the rail corridor, installing some station infrastructure, and relocating utilities for parts of the line that are shared by the GO rail corridor.  

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Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Feb 22, 2022 - 13:09

The LPassby Level of 64 exceeds what is acceptable by the World Health organization and the Ministry of Environment and Climate Change. How does Metrolinx justify this sound level given that there will be 496 trains travelling on the tracks, each way? Does this number also represent the decibal level when two trains are actually passing by each other, as well as the 4 dBAs for track noise as stated in your EIAR?
Existing Day /
Night Baseline
Sound Level
(dBA)1
Day / Night
Limit (dBA)2
Train Lpassby
Level (dBA)
Lpassby
Limit (dBA)
Compliance
with Limit
(Y/N)
170 Hopedale Ave RR_RESD_001 Train (Day/Night) Sound Level (dBA) - 56 / 51 Current Day/Night 55 / 50 Day/Night Limit 60 / 55
LPassby Level 64

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 11, 2022 - 18:57

The criteria that Metrolinx adheres to is provided by the Ministry of Environment, Conservation and Parks for stationary noise sources such as the Maintenance and Storage Facility, as well as rail industry noise guidelines for noise associated with train movements (i.e. FTA guidelines, see Section 5.4 of Noise and Vibration Report). These criteria target impacts to existing noise levels, which in the study area for Ontario Line have been measured to be typically higher than the 55 and 50 dBA levels cited by the World Health Organization. The Environmental Impact Assessment Report outlines the existing noise levels we identified during monitoring activities throughout the Ontario Line study area, which were presented in the Environmental Conditions Report (2020).

The 4 dBA for track noise is associated with trains at the portal, which generates a noise increase above the train passby noise level as trains enter and leave the portal. This is based on a 4 dBA correction, as has been used in other Metrolinx projects (Eglinton Crosstown) and we anticipate this will be similar for Ontario Line.

Though our assessment was for a single train passby, a second train would not significantly increase the noise level as they pass each other. Though both trains individually contribute the same passby (64 dBA), each would also shield the other, acting like a barrier between the receptor and noise source.

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Anonymous's avatar
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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 9, 2022 - 12:58

A frac-out is the unintentional loss of drilling fluids during a drilling operation. Frac-out can happen during horizontal drilling and mitigation measures include using tunneling equipment designed to reduce the potential for frac-out, and developing a frac-out contingency plan, if required. In addition, a Spill Prevention and Contingency Plan will be developed by the contractor to prevent and respond to any spills that may occur during construction.

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Anonymous's avatar

The proposed route and supporting infrastructure impacts environmentally sensitive areas in the Don Valley, close to the Science Centre. Additionally, well established, high value residential and retail neighbourhoods, particularly in Leslieville, will be subject to expropriation and possible negative impacts of having a major transportation route alter the character of the area.
Here are my questions:
1. Why would the Don Valley parkland be preferred over other potential sites further down the route, including the hydro corridor in Thorncliffe? Park?
2. How will Metrolinx address the concerns local residences and businesses have about the project's impact in both Thorncliffe Park and Leslieville?
3. To what extent are the decisions surrounding the route influenced by factors that are not addressed in the study, in a transparent way? Meaning, Metrolinks has a history of pursuing other agendas during the progress of a major project (Crosstown LRT) that have included development deals that are revealed long after the project has begun. This has not cast the agency is the best light as a transparent player working in the best interests of its major stakeholders, Ontario citizens.
4. What is the compensation model for properties that will b expropriated? Full market value, with bidding, as is the case in private sales? Surrender value as determined by the Ontario government? Assessment role value?
5. The Crosstown is years late and billions over budget. What is the plan to ensure this does not happen with the Ontario Line?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 9, 2022 - 12:38

Regarding your first question, if in reference to the Don Valley Layover Facility, you can find more information here on the GO Expansion website. 

With respect to supporting businesses, we are committed to going above and beyond to protect local businesses, organizations and jobs. We are working closely with impacted owners and tenants to find ways to help them relocate within the community or nearby.  

We’ve made connections with the City of Toronto’s Economic Development Department to ensure we’re looking at this from every possible angle.  

We have to keep the details of our negotiations confidential because of the unique business requirements we discuss with each operation, but we will exhaust every available avenue as we support them through the relocation process. 

To provide some more details on the planning process for the Ontario Line route, we studied station locations with a focus on increasing access to transit, maximizing ridership, achieving travel time savings, reducing overcrowding on existing transit services and creating better access to jobs. If you want to learn more, you can read the Preliminary Design Business Case (pages 40-51 provide the overview and rationale for west stations). 

Regarding compensation, whenever Metrolinx needs to acquire property easements, property owners can expect to be compensated at fair market value, as determined by a third-party appraiser. Metrolinx will enlist the services of a third-party appraisal expert to estimate the unbiased value of the property easement. Market factors at the time of the easement acquisition will inform the valuation and will be based on comparable sales of similar easements in similar locations and situations. 

Concerning project delivery, Metrolinx and Infrastructure Ontario (IO) will use a public-private partnership (P3) procurement model to ensure the Ontario Line is delivered efficiently and cost effectively. The P3 approach will leverage private sector innovation in design and construction and increase budget and schedule certainty. To date, IO’s P3 projects have a 95 per cent on-budget track record and a 69 per cent on-time delivery record, which far outpaces traditional project delivery and is significantly above industry standard. 

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Anonymous's avatar

On what side will the tracks be onspecifically at Aldwych and pape? Will they be directly below the street, or be closer to the west side of pape or the east sode of pape? Specifically as it passes Aldwych ave.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 13:52

The Ontario Line tracks will run underground primarily below Pape Avenue between Pape and Cosburn stations, with some deviations in the route. You can see the underground tunnel location on our online interactive map, and you can also look up specific addresses and see the Ontario Line in relation to properties of interest. 

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Anonymous's avatar
Feb 22, 2022 - 07:40

how high will be the OL bridge crossing the Valley from Pape to Thorncliffe, be above the DVP? How far down the existing East valley wall will the tunnel portal emerge, and on the western valley wall where will the Thorncliffe tunnel portal be placed?

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 15, 2022 - 12:28

The approximate height of the bridge arch from top of the bridge deck is 25 metres and from top of the Don Valley Parkway is 32 metres. The Ontario Line will emerge from the southern bank of the Don Valley at Minton Place, and the bridge connecting to Thorncliffe Park will be slim and well-designed to minimize visual and environmental impacts.  

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Anonymous's avatar

Obviously the station cannot remain named Science Centre when there’s a much closer station to the Science Centre under development. Make the change now before it’s too late.

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 11, 2022 - 11:02

We’ll be looking for opportunities throughout the planning and design process to get public feedback on design elements. We look forward to working with community members and the City of Toronto on how to design Ontario Line stations that communities will be proud of. 

We will work with the communities along the line to determine station names that are clear and representative of the neighbourhoods they will serve. We’ll share more details on those opportunities in the future. 

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