> Ontario Line - Ask a Question #3 | Metrolinx Engage

Ontario Line - Ask a Question #3

Submit your question below. We’ll post an answer to your question within three to five business days. Be sure to vote for your favourite questions.

NOTE: Conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in the removal of your submission.

Comment Sort

Comments

Add new comment

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Dec 4, 2020 - 13:45

What is the estimated travel time between Pape Station and Queen Station?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 8, 2020 - 15:04

Currently, the estimated travel time from Pape Station to Queen Station is 18 minutes. Once the Ontario Line is operational, you will get there five minutes faster.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Dec 9, 2020 - 21:16

So you are telling me the Ontario line takes 12 minutes from Pape station to Osgoode Station but it takes 13 minutes from Pape station to Queen station?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Dec 9, 2020 - 21:27

That dosen't make sense?
Doesn't Queen station come before Osgoode station on the Ontario Line?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 17, 2020 - 12:17

The travel time estimates are being refined as project planning progresses and we collect more data. The Preliminary Design Business Case projects 13 minute trip between Pape and Queen stations on the Ontario Line. With trains arriving every 90 seconds and automated doors on both the platforms and trains, the Ontario Line will get people where they need to be faster and easier than ever before.

Daniel's avatar
Dec 9, 2020 - 22:31

Hi!
I know that Metrolinx is saving on costs by building an elevated guideway along Don Mills all the way to the Science Centre station. There will be a lot of high-density development here (with a large population facing Don Mills) and this would be detrimental to my quality of life - since I already own a condo on Eglinton/Don Mills. I've spoken to some other residents of from my building, and we are very concerned that this will worsen the quality of life and property values. I also realized that this doesn't achieve the city planning policies of the Don Mills Crossing Secondary Plan, which calls for a very different vision for the corridor. This proposed alignment will worsen the pedestrian experience at street level and will make the area less attractive. Also, the proposed Science Centre station for the OL won't even connect with the existing station that was built to accommodate a seamless underground connection. I know an underground alignment for Don Mills would cost more money, but could you please forward this to the project team for their consideration? Could Metrolinx please consider our needs and build the OL underground on Don Mills? I know this will cost more, but this will be a very high-density area (unlike Leslieville) and the least you could do is lower the OL around the Don Mills/Eglinton intersection.

Thanks for considering my comments!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 17, 2020 - 11:51

Elevated guideways and stations will be designed with your community in mind, using modern design approaches that will be attractive additions to the neighbourhoods they serve. The stations in this area will also make it faster and easier to transfer between the Ontario Line to other connecting transit options.

Because of the Ontario Line’s mix of below ground, at-grade and elevated track, it is able to reach more communities sooner. At twice the length of the previously proposed Downtown Relief Line South, the Ontario Line will give residents of Thorncliffe Park, Flemingdon Park and Liberty Village access to higher order transit, and be built within a similar timeframe.

Using a mix of surface tracks, elevated structures and tunnels is a proven approach. The TTC has taken this approach with Line 1, Line 2 and Line 3, and many other transit systems have adopted it to deliver superior rapid transit within impressive timeframes. For example, the majority of stations and tracks for world-class transit services like Vancouver’s SkyTrain network and London, England’s Docklands Light Railway system are above ground. Since those systems began in the 80s, the SkyTrain has become the longest rapid transit system in Canada and the Docklands Light Railway system has grown to nearly 40 kilometres worth of track.

There are many benefits to building the alignment above ground, including fewer construction and property impacts, shorter construction timeframes, and a better customer experience. To clarify, the Eglinton Crosstown’s Science Centre station is not a true underground station; it is a “hybrid” located just below the surface of the street in order to avoid traffic impacts at the intersection of Don Mills & Eglinton. Based on our analysis of the geology of this area, the Ontario Line would be required to tunnel much deeper in order to build underground in this segment. Stations here would need to be the deepest in Toronto’s transit network, over nine storeys underground, making for much longer connection times to buses at street level.

In 2021, we will begin to share design renderings for community feedback, including images of the elevated guideway, which will make use of modern construction techniques that allow for quieter, thinner, more attractive designs and the latest technology to minimize noise and disruption.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Dec 15, 2020 - 22:21

Hi. When is the Preliminary Design Business Case coming out?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 17, 2020 - 12:22

The Preliminary Design Business case was released today. You can read more by clicking here.

Anonymous's avatar
Dec 16, 2020 - 01:30

The station at Queen and Spadina should be called “Chinatown” to reflect the cultural diversity of this part of Toronto. The community is also under increasing pressure from gentrification, and risks erasure. There is a station on the Vancouver SkyTrain called “Chinatown”, and Metrolinx should replicate this with a “Chinatown” station at Queen and Spadina to help cement this community on the map.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 17, 2020 - 11:57

We appreciate your feedback and will share it with our project team. The current names of stations are working names and there will be a community engagement process to select the final names for the Ontario Line stations. Given Toronto’s rich history and diversity, we are looking forward to lots of creative suggestions.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Dec 16, 2020 - 13:48

I heard you had a google meet for the Ontario Line? That's a good idea to meet with residents one-on-one to share your concerns. Any other ones? I'd like to attend.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 17, 2020 - 11:59

We’ve been engaging lots of different ways while public health measures have prevented us from meeting together in person. We’re happy to setup a voice or video call with you.  As the project goes forward, there will be more online engagement opportunities to talk about the Ontario Line. Please email [email protected] or call 416-202-5100 if you would like to schedule a time to chat with one of us. We also encourage folks to sign up for our e-newsletter to receive updates.

Daniel's avatar
Dec 17, 2020 - 13:59

Hi! I just read the Preliminary Design Business Case, and I'm concerned about the length and maximum speed of the train.

According to the document, platforms are planned to be 100m in length. In that case, why not invest a little more to have 100m (instead 80m) trains? This would result in more capacity and would definitely help relieve Bloor-Yonge station of its overcrowded state (one of the primary objectives of this project). If we're spending billions of dollars on the most important new subway line in our city, then use the investment to create the best possible value!

Also, the document says that the maximum speed of the train model is expected to be 80 km/h. Considering the many straight sections of the line, why can't the max speed be increased to 100 km/h? Many systems around the world (including Vancouver's Skytrain) operate at 100 km/h whenever possible. In order to get more people of their cars, the trains should go as fast as they possibly could (when the line's geometry allows it to do so). Could Metrolinx please require the rolling stock provider to deliver trains with a higher max speed?

Thank you! Let's make the most of this project!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 23, 2020 - 09:52

The Preliminary Design Business Case anticipates that 80-meter trains at 40 trains per hour can sustain ridership demands until approximately 2060. At its current design, the Ontario Line will have the capacity to run up to 40 trains per hour, every 90 seconds, which will provide much-needed transit relief and reduce station crowding. For instance, we estimate that Bloor-Yonge Station will see a 22% reduction, or 14,000 fewer people, during rush hour. Using shorter trains now will allow us to operate faster, with shorter wait times between trains, and will offer better service while meeting demand. In the future, as ridership demand increases, the longer station platforms (100m) will allow us to accommodate more passengers with the potential for longer trains.

While the top speed of the train is 80 km/hour, given stops at stations and turns in the track, we estimate the average speed will be 30 km/hour. The Ontario Line alignment includes several tight curves and steep slopes and relatively short distances between stations. In most cases, the train will not reach the top speed before it is necessary to start slowing down again. However, a high tractive capability that supports rapid acceleration on steep grades will mean that customers will still experience a smooth and quick journey.

On the Ontario Line, a trip from Exhibition Place to the Science Centre will save customers 40 minutes, and a trip from Thorncliffe Park to downtown (King and Bay) will be 15 minutes shorter.

Daniel's avatar
Dec 17, 2020 - 16:06

Hi again! I left a comment under the name "Northern Alignment" and received a reply from you. I understand that it's inconvenient that tunneling Science Centre station would require a depth of over 9 stories, and I fully understand the benefits of elevated transit. However, I was wondering if you could take a different approach. Could the engineers build an OL platform directly beneath the Eglinton Line's platform? Couldn't you emulate the Bloor-Yonge type of station or the ones that exist in New York (where platforms are directly underneath the road and interchange station platforms are stacked on top of each other)? The problem is that the current elevated plan that crosses the street is just terrible from an urban design perspective, especially for a high-density neighbourhood that should avoid excessive noise and is meant to have attractive streets. While the current plan's station connects better to the bus terminal, it makes for an inconvenient transfer to the Eglinton Line. A short, direct transfer to other rapid transit lines (as is usually provided in subway stations) is important reduce travel times and attract more users. A convenient transfer to rapid transit is more important than one for buses. Again, I was wondering if you could minimize costs by building a platform directly underneath the Eglinton Line platform (similar to old TTC stations and New York's subway). This would be much better for the community.

If the team still decides to build an elevated line here, it should be done thoughtfully in order to create a good community. The design should be of the highest quality with great emphasis on the experience of pedestrians. It should IMPROVE the area - not just mitigate negative effects. With thoughtful design, the elevated tracks can be a welcoming and attractive feature in the neighbourhood, with a focus on placemaking and walkability. I understand that modern techniques for building the structure will result in less bulkiness, but I think Metrolinx can do even better than that. Instead of just building bare concrete, the structure could use colour, plants, nicer materials, art, and other things that would make it integrate and be a positive contribution to the street. Again, when designing this, picture yourself walking along the street and think of ways to make the structure attractive and not ugly (not just concrete). Please create a design that would make people want to take the train and would enhance the community.

Thank you for considering my comments. I would really appreciate it if they were forwarded to the team.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 21, 2020 - 15:13

Thanks for sharing your further thoughts which have been passed along to our design and technical team. We look forward to continuing the conversation with the public as plans for the Ontario Line continue to advance. Community feedback is helping us improve the project and we agree that it’s important to get it right the first time, balancing a range of considerations and factors.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Dec 18, 2020 - 23:29

Quietly, the timelines for this project have changed as the Ontario Line is expected to be delivered in 2030. Can you go into detail as to why that is the case? I also noticed the contracts won't be awarded until 2022; is there not a way to expedite this stage of the process? I bring this up as I have always been so curious to know why it takes a decade to build one transit line in this city when other parts of the world can build underground subways projects in half the time. For example how does the 3 stop Scarborough Subway Extension have the same timeline as the Ontario Line? If anything, that should be an "easier" build as it is only 3 stops. Anyways, just something I have always thought about and hope you can answer.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 21, 2020 - 14:37

The Ontario Line is a combination of below ground, at-grade, and elevated track. One of the benefits of using different kinds of track is that the Ontario Line can be built quicker.

When the project was originally announced, the Province communicated that the Ontario Line could be open as early as 2027. The 2027 timeline was based on delivering the Ontario Line as a single, integrated P3 (public-private-partnership) project. In the latter part of 2019, as we worked to prepare the project for procurement, changing market conditions began to emerge prompting a shift in market interest away from an integrated approach. As COVID-19 took hold, the effects of the pandemic began to be felt on subway program activities underway, with requests for extensions on open procurements. This was on top of an observed shift in market capacity and the construction industry’s appetite for risk.

Our strategy to deliver the Ontario Line as three separate P3 contracts on a staggered schedule will help to mitigate market issues – including impacts from COVID 19. Ultimately, the final construction schedule will be developed by the consortiums who bid on the project.

 

Anonymous's avatar
Dec 24, 2020 - 22:57

The line should be extended to Sheppard as soon as possible.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 29, 2020 - 16:03

With its 15 stations and connections to many other transit services, the Ontario Line will put more fast, frequent and reliable rapid transit in easy reach -- more than 255,000 people will live within a 10-minute walk of an Ontario Line station. The proposed Ontario Line route was selected with a view to making the best use of available funding to increase access to transit, maximize ridership, achieve travel time savings, reduce overcrowding on existing transit services and create better access to jobs. While an extension to Shepperd isn’t part of the current plans for the Ontario Line, tail tracks north of Science Centre station will protect for future expansion.

Anonymous's avatar
Dec 28, 2020 - 11:25

Will the Eglinton, Flemingdon, and Thorncliffe stations be open air or fully enclosed? It can get quite windy here between tall buildings and being on top of the valley, so we'd want to stay toasty warm waiting for the train in the winter!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 29, 2020 - 16:02

There will be covered and enclosed areas within the station where customers can wait but with trains arriving approximately every 90 seconds you won’t wait long. We’ll be sharing more information about the station designs as procurement advances.

Anonymous's avatar

I was wondering if there will continue to be regular, frequent bus service along Overlea between the two stations because it is quite a distance to get to either one if you live half way between the two.

Thanks.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Dec 31, 2020 - 12:51

Metrolinx has been and remains committed to continue working with the TTC to ensure the Ontario Line provides excellent transit connectivity.  Determining bus routes (including stops and frequency) is done by the TTC.  They will communicate any changes to existing bus routes closer to the Ontario Line opening date.

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 5, 2021 - 23:06

Hi there,

The following is written on the project website "Construction for the project is anticipated in 2021, when teams break ground on early works for the project. This work will include existing bridge modifications and new Ontario Line bridges, rail corridor expansion, station work, and utility relocations for parts of the line that are shared by the GO rail corridor."

I just want to know if this construction is still slated to start this spring and if you can elaborate on the following points:
- Bridge Modifications: Which bridges will be worked on?
- New Ontario Line Bridges: Will this include the new bridges being built across the Don River near the Lakeshore and by the Leaside Bridge?
- Rail Corridor Expansion: Will this be happening at Exhibition Station and on the rail corridor in Leslieville?
- Station work: Which ones?

I ask as I really want this project to hit the ground running and want no more interference from our politicians. Starting this construction would be huge step in the right direction.

Thanks,

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 6, 2021 - 15:11

Early works construction will occur in areas where the Ontario Line runs with GO rail lines in the same rail corridor. By coordinating Ontario Line construction and previously planned GO Expansion work, we will reduce the overall property and construction impacts, while ensuring timely construction.

As you noted on our website, early works are anticipated in three areas: Exhibition Station, the Lower Don Bridges, and the Lakeshore East Joint Corridor. As initial designs are completed for each area, we will release an early works environmental report for public consultation. The draft report will provide further details about the work, anticipated impacts and proposed mitigations. Consultation on the draft Exhibition Station Early Works Report ended on January 5 but you can still review the report. We’ll release further information about other planned early works later this winter/spring.

Anonymous's avatar

What is the estimated travel time between Pape Station and Queen Station with the Ontario line?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 8, 2021 - 15:14

We estimate that the travel time from Pape to Queen Station will be approximately 13 minutes. Travel times between stations will be refined as project planning advances. 

Anonymous's avatar

I'm concerned for vibrations and noise once built. How deep will it be and can you show rendering for Berkeley St. and how it will be affected?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 11, 2021 - 16:02

While we are currently studying geotechnical soil conditions and have not yet determined the specific final depth for the alignment, we anticipate that the depth of tunnel in this location will be at least 20 metres underground which will minimize noise and vibration impacts during operation. The current route puts the Ontario Line east of Berkeley Street, which reduces property impacts and speeds up construction. We will have more details to share over the next few months and in the forthcoming Environmental Impact Assessment Report.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 12, 2021 - 11:10

Will the trains be modern and connected like line 1 so we can walk from one end to the other, or old fashioned like line 2 where we are stuck in one car?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 14, 2021 - 12:03

While the Preliminary Business Design Case notes that the trains may have open pathways to allow passengers to travel between cars, exact train design details will be determined by the successful proponent of the Rolling Stock, Systems, Operations and Maintenance procurement contract.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 13, 2021 - 11:43

The recent updates provided no further details on the MSF location/layout. When will something be provided for the public to view. ?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 14, 2021 - 12:04

We anticipate that additional MSF information will be available in the first few months of 2021. When we have an update ready to share, notice will be provided through elected officials, community groups and our e-newsletter.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 17, 2021 - 15:30

Are we going with 80m trains now? Wouldnt that reduce capacity? We need all the capacity we got in order to relieve Line 1 and 2. The old Relief Line plan did that best.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 19, 2021 - 10:16

The plan outlined in the Preliminary Design Business Case is for the Ontario Line to have 80-metre trains, combined with frequent service to meet current and future demand. Using shorter, and lighter trains means more frequent service, less waiting for the train, and an overall better customer experience. With trains as frequent as every 90 seconds, up to 40 trains per hour, the Ontario Line will meet ridership volumes up until about 2060. As a result, the Ontario Line will reduce crowding, we estimate by 13% at Union Station, for example.

In addition, station platforms will be built to accommodate 100 metre trains, providing the possibility to scale up and meet even greater ridership demands in the future.

Anonymous's avatar

There were several issues shared last year by many regarding the North Segment of the Ontario Line, specifically the crossover after the Leaside Bridge into the "Thorncliffe" portion which is troublesome.

In fact, these concerns and offers of alternatives were shared with the Metrolinx team, city councillors and the MPP at a virtual meeting held on October 19, 2020. The Metrolinx team promised to follow up on the many issues and alternate suggestions proposed....was this done? Will there be any changes to the current alignment of the track in the Thorncliffe area to avoid Overlea Blvd. completely?

As one of 142 residents living on Overlea Blvd at 1 Leaside Park Drive. I am voicing the concerns that several thousands of my neighbours share (both in my building and in the numerous residential areas, and businesses that front Overlea Blvd.).

The current alignment brings this major railway even closer to a seven story residential condominium (just meters from 1 Leaside Park Drive) and has the crossover happen on the South East corner of Overlea Boulevard, and Millwood Road (see Marker#1 on your current visual).

This crossing is troublesome for many reasons including....

KEY ISSUES WITH CURRENT ALIGNMENT:

1. HEALTH + SAFETY: The crossover is currently on the corner and boulevard where there are several residential properties (especially 1 Leaside Park Drive). In fact, the current route continues to negatively impact a seven story condominium, a town house complex, other condominiums near Overlea and Thorncliffe Park, a senior's home, several businesses on both sides of Overlea Blvd. In addition, there are numerous community organizations and numerous service providers including (the Salvation Army, Thorncliffe Neighbourhood Office, The Islamic Center, the Midwives Clinic, Food Banks, The Employment Training Center, March of Dimes, The Language Instruction for Newcomers). All of who live and work along this segment of Overlea Blvd.

The Health concerns for all involved who live and work here include:
• noise and environmental pollution (impacting several residences - condos, townhomes; places of worship, seniors’ home, service providers) → especially with a frequency of trains (running every 90 seconds); vibration, privacy issues, physical and visual intrusion, lost air rights, safety, etc.
• Living in a state of construction and traffic gridlock outside our front door for several years;
• visual and physical intrusion - over the Don Valley, over a SMALL tree-lined residential boulevard

2. TRAFFIC GRIDLOCK: according to this updated route, the elevated rail would cross TWO streets (both Millwood Rd. and Overlea Blvd.). The traffic gridlock that this would bring is unbearable.

Given that most of the line after the new Thorncliffe Station has been moved to run into the industrial area, why isn't the crossover reallocated to do the same? This is an equity issue for everyone living AND working along Overlea Blvd.

• This construction chaos would also result in delays for Emergency response calls (of which we have many First Responders using Millwood and Overlea Blvd) to reach the Overlea and Thorncliffe areas.

3. ECONOMIC IMPACT – DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY VALUES: this current alignment will undoubtedly destroy property values in this segment and have a financial impact on businesses along route – (consider the impact of the Eglinton LRT that has resulted in over 100 small stores closing and is taking over 11 years to build)

4. EQUITY: To add, an elevated rail running along ANY part of Overlea Blvd segregates and alienates the Overlea and Thorncliffe Community. Doug Ford, as a Toronto city councillor in 2012 led a push with his brother, then Mayor Rob Ford, to cast plans for above - ground transit in Scarborough as "second rate and one that alienated suburban Scarborough". Doug Ford added in an interview that year… "The people have spoken loud and clear. Scarborough councillors, MPPs. Everyone in Scarborough wants underground (transit)… I listen to the taxpayers and I'm sure the premier (then Dalton McGuinty) will do the same.”

→ The people who live and work along this segment of Overlea Boulevard are speaking loud and clear in our community: Why is it acceptable then to impose such a "second rate" plan on any other communities (such as the Thorncliffe Park)? This is an equity issue.

5. ENVIRONMENT + HERITAGE SIGN: This route would impact the appearance of the entry into Thorncliffe Park (the Heritage sign has been on that corner since the 1970s and signals the entry to the Thorncliffe community); it would destroy the large cluster of beautiful trees that form a canopy and block the current roadway, and be even closer to the park space at Leaside Park (where hundreds of community members enjoy the green space daily).

PROPOSED ALTERNATIVES TO THIS ROUTE TO AVOID RESIDENTIAL IMPACT:

OPTION 1: Move the Ontario Line one block west to connect over Millwood to Banigan Drive which joins to Thorncliffe Park Drive (and the current new station location). → This change would avoid impacting any residential properties, or community service providers and would eliminate many of the issues noted above. (See Aerial Attachment)
• Option #1 would put the rail over ONE road (Millwood) rather than crossing two roads (both Millwood and Overlea),.
• This ensures greater safety, and less disruption from construction, for all who live (and work) in this segment.
• Still easy access: People would rather take a 3-5 minute walk to the train, than have all of these health impacts associated with a train in the middle of a residential community...let alone on a small boulevard.
• It is more fitting that a major railway with fast speed trains every 90 seconds, run through industrial areas rather than impact any residential areas.
• There would still be easy access to the station at Thorncliffe Park Drive (west)

OPTION 2: MOST BENEFICIAL OPTION FOR THE OVERLEA –THORNLIFFE COMMUNITY IF THE LINE MUST RUN AT GRADE/OVER GRADE:
(See Aerial Attachment)

→ Move the alignment closer to the existing railway, running it along Village Station Road → Connect to Pat Moore Drive → Connect to Thorncliffe Park and relocate the Thorncliffe Station EAST, closer to where you originally had it, on the corner of Thorncliffe Park Drive and Pat Moore Drive. (Please see attached aerial.)

ADDED BENEFITS TO THIS OPTION #2:

• This option would avoid ALL negative community impacts and ALL of the issues outlined…including to all residential properties, to all businesses, to all places of worship and to all community service providers…it is a win-win for all.

• It would be more cost effective as Metrolinx could run much of the line at grade level, AND have the space to do so.

• It would put the rail crossing over only ONE road (Millwood) rather than two…This saves Overlea Blvd from the destructive impact of construction and traffic gridlock for several years.

• It is still easily accessible for the Thorncliffe community (the walk is a short 3 minute walk – one block west)…This re-location of the station would arguably gain better ridership as there are more apartment bldgs. on the east side of Thorncliffe Park Drive and hence more commuters. To be clear, residents along the south side of Thorncliffe Pk. (eg. 65 Thorncliffe, 47 Thorncliffe Pk. Etc.) will opt to take a bus to Pape Station and pick up the Ontario Line there rather than walk 15 minutes to anywhere along Overlea Blvd. If you are truly serving the ridership, it will be the residents living and working along Overlea Blvd. who would want the line moved 1 block west (3 min walk) and avoid the chaos of construction and a railway.

• It is more fitting that this major railway with fast speed trains, run through the northern industrial lands rather than in dense communities….and it would connect more easily to the rest of the Ontario line as it leads to the Flemington stop.

This area of Overlea Blvd. is home to thousands of residents and workers. Please ensure that transit growth is responsible, equitable and as Metrolinx says: “completed in a way that not only serves local transit riders, but also fits into the communities they call home".

The harm caused by an above-ground rail on any part of Overlea Blvd. will be permanent, life altering, and felt for generations.
You will have much more buy in from the entire community that this rail is to serve. Please be responsible and think about the long term impact of this transit line, make the necessary changes to the current alignment. To some this is a project that you want to complete...to us, this is our HOME, WORK and LIVING space!

This information was shared at the October 19 meeting with Metrolinx....We were told that the team would give this serious consideration and the MPP and city councillor agreed that a alternative solution was very feasible....Has there been any follow up to address this in the planning for this segment?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 29, 2021 - 17:15

Thank you we value your thoughts and appreciate your concerns, options and feedback. Suggestions raised at the October 19, 2020 meeting were taken back to our project team for their consideration. We were grateful for the opportunity to meet and we are looking forward to returning to continue our discussion with the community at 1 Leaside Park Drive.

We understand and share the importance of health and safety. Safety is central to everything we do at Metrolinx and we would not build or operate transit services that were not safe for neighbours, customers or employees. Noise, vibration and visual impacts from elevated transit lines have been successfully mitigated in Singapore, Paris, and Vancouver. By using the latest technology and techniques our construction partners will use their experience to create a quieter, thinner, and more attractive design. Over the next few years we look forward to the public’s feedback as we present future environmental studies and reports. These reports will provide further information on our plans to mitigate noise and vibration, like using continuous welded rail and rail dampeners to minimize vibration. In addition, we look forward to share renderings and images of potential designs with the public.

We recognize and appreciate the businesses and residents that make the Thorncliffe neighbourhood a vibrant community. Although we are still in the process of finalizing property requirements, we will strive to reduce the impact to homeowners, traffic, and important community services. 

The Ontario Line will be electrified which will mean that no additional emissions will be added into your community. The Ontario Line will provide much needed access to higher order transit, providing a fast and convenient alternative to driving. We estimate that the Ontario Line will mean 28,000 fewer cars on the road per day and reduce annual fuel consumption by 7.2 million litres. Throughout the project, we will strive to reduce the impact to trees. Where the impact to trees is unavoidable, Metrolinx will compensate lost trees at according to the Metrolinx Vegetation Guideline. As the project progresses, we look forward to continue the conversation with the community.

Anonymous's avatar

"At its current design, the Ontario Line will have the capacity to run up to 40 trains per hour, every 90 seconds" - Clearly Metrolinx could not care less about the impact on the Leslieville-Riverdale area through which the above-ground portion will run. This of course is in addition to the GO trains that already run through the corridor. So, how many trains per hour in total will actually be passing through, including GO & Ontario Line, in both directions? Have you done any studies on the impact that will have on the surrounding environment, including the impact of the near constant noise on the mental health of those who live in the area?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 27, 2021 - 16:56

While the Ontario Line will have the capacity to run trains every 90 seconds, service levels and schedules will be communicated closer to the Ontario Line opening date. We understand the need to preserve the character of the Riverside-Leslieville neighbourhood. That’s why we will be installing noise and vibration mitigation measures that we anticipate will effectively eliminate noise and vibration from the Ontario Line and reduce the noise from GO and VIA train operations.

Effective, well designed landscaping, new trees, and noise barriers will significantly reduce sound from the rail corridor. Because the Ontario Line trains will be automated, sounds from vehicle brakes will be minimal. Trains will run on continuous tracks with no joints, supported by rubber bases, which will further reduce the noise at its source. Installation of the noise barriers in this area is a priority and will be included in the early works package for this portion of the corridor. 

Details on these and other mitigations will be included as part of environmental reports to be released later this year for public consultation. These reports will include in-depth studies on the anticipated impacts of construction and operation of the Ontario Line, with a specific focus on noise and vibration.

We are committed to fitting the Ontario Line into the communities it will serve and look forward to working with the community as the environmental assessment process progresses.

 

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jan 22, 2021 - 18:30

Any possibility that Cosburn can be called East York Station instead?

Also, Corktown seems like it might be in St. Lawrence, sort of?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 26, 2021 - 16:58

Thank you for your feedback about station names for Cosburn and Corktown Stations. The current station names are working names only and we are looking forward to a community engagement process to select final station names for the Ontario Line. Stay tuned!

Anonymous's avatar
Jan 27, 2021 - 15:56

I am wondering how deep the rail tracks will be on the northern section, especially under Minton Ave and Hopedale Ave. {where I live}. This is just before the train pops out of the tunnel onto the bridge over the DVP. And how does this compare to the depth of the rail tracks on the Danforth line, say around the Pape station?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jan 29, 2021 - 17:12

The depth of the Ontario Line in the north segment will vary depending on the location. The Ontario Line will pass under Line 2 at Pape Station at a depth of approximately 25 to 30 metres below ground. At Minton Place, the Ontario Line will raise to approximately 10 metres below ground before crossing the Don River. Our team is currently working to fine tune alignment specifics and depth details are subject to change. 

Khalil Heron's avatar
Jan 30, 2021 - 23:23

The original proposal had the line running along the road median on Overlea Blvd. The more recent rendition of the alignment has altered this so it runs on the north-western side of the road instead. Is there a specific reason for this? In my opinion, at least having the tracks run along the middle of the road would be a lot nicer looker given the symmetry. Overlea already has a wide median along much of its course so I don't see why the alignment there was changed. Having the tracks run above the median may also give future developers some more room to have their structures built closer to the street.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Feb 3, 2021 - 09:44

By shifting the elevated guideway to the north side of Overlea, we are able to reduce impacts to traffic during construction and provide a safer customer journey. This also preserves the unique character of the boulevard. Sensitive design using modern materials will help ensure that any new infrastructure fits with the community it will serve and we look forward to sharing initial designs and more information as the project advances.

Anonymous's avatar
Feb 8, 2021 - 17:25

Will the Ontario Line have Platform Screen Doors? Will the other subway projects like the Scarborough Subway and Eglinton West LRT have them as well?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Feb 19, 2021 - 14:29

The Ontario Line train doors will automatically open and close in sync with platform edge doors that will be installed at all stations, keeping both passengers and objects safely separated from moving vehicles. The Scarborough Subway Extension will also protect for this feature in the design and construction of the extension, however, it would only be implemented once the rest of Line 2 is retrofitted to accommodate platform edge doors. Seeing as the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension project is in the early design stage for the stations, rail and systems work, station amenities including platform edge doors are being evaluated as part of the design process. If you have any further questions about the Scarborough Subway Extension, please contact [email protected]. For questions about the Eglinton Crosstown West Extension, please contact [email protected].

Khalil Heron's avatar

Khalil Heron
Feb 9, 2021 - 10:37

You've said that the community will have some involvement in the naming of stations, but will the public be able to influence the design of stations? Many have felt the stations on the Line 1 Extension to Vaughan or the Crosstown have been pretty bland and boring looking so community input on the design of Ontario line stations could be useful and add character. For example, a station at queen and Spadina could be designed to reflect its location in the middle of Chinatown, but without community input that seems unlikely to happen.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Feb 10, 2021 - 12:38

Our goal for the Ontario Line is that each of the stations integrate well with the neighborhoods they will serve, and reflect their unique character and feel. Community feedback will be an important part of seeing this through and we look forward to sharing more information as the design and procurement phases advance.

Anonymous's avatar
Feb 10, 2021 - 14:38

I am trying to see where the west line will exactly go. The map you are showing is very vague. Please show me a more detailed map for the area from King & Bathurst running south.
Also how deep are you going? How do you avoid the Garrison creek and condo's in the area?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Feb 17, 2021 - 13:30

Our most recent maps for the west segment of the Ontario Line can be found on Metrolinx Engage here and the segment overview map shows the route from the station at King Bathurst to Exhibition. While the planning and design is still underway, the Ontario Line will be quite deep in order to avoid many condos, underground parking garages, basements and existing utilities.  Investigative drilling and surveying is being used to confirm the locations of utilities underground and ground conditions to avoid any impact. More details regarding the route and depth of the tracks will be shared as the project advances.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Feb 12, 2021 - 12:40

Would the GO Expansion corridor between Gerrard and Queen, and then out to the east bank of the Don River still require expansion to 4 tracks if VIA Rail moved its service to the Richmond Hill GO corridor?

Could Ontario Line + GO Expansion be only 5 tracks, or possibly even only 4 tracks, if VIA Rail services into Union Station were relocated?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Feb 24, 2021 - 10:48

There are currently no plans to relocate VIA service. Even without VIA service in this corridor, the 4th GO track is required to accommodate the planned two-way all-day electrified GO service and thanks to careful planning and design work we do not anticipate any significant expansions of the current Lakeshore East GO corridor footprint when the one GO track and two Ontario Line tracks are added.

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 3, 2021 - 09:52

La Ligne Ontario est un projet Metrolinx. Comment les mises à jour, l'affichage et les annonces respecteront-ils la Loi sur les services en français?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 10, 2021 - 10:42

Nous nous engageons à nous assurer que des renseignements sont disponibles en français. Toute nouvelle information publiée sur notre site Web est disponible en anglais et en français, notamment les avis à la communauté, les articles d’Info Metrolinx et les mises à jour concernant Metrolinx Participez. Dans ce forum public, nos réponses seront rédigées dans la langue du billet initial. Certains rapports techniques ne sont traduits que sur demande. Cependant, nous collaborerons toujours avec quelqu’un afin de fournir des informations sur la Ligne Ontario en français.

En ce qui concerne l’exploitation du transport en commun, notre engagement public envers la prestation des services en français se trouve ici.

Anonymous's avatar

Hi there, as resident in the lakeshore community, we believe the Ontario Line will add great convenience to our lives and would love to contribute any way that we could!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 16, 2021 - 09:16

Thank you for reaching out. We also believe we that the Ontario Line will make it easier and faster for more people to get to where they live, work and play. We would ask that you continue to stay engaged as the project advances, including by providing your feedback and asking any questions you may have. If you have not yet, signing up to our newsletter on our website is a great way to stay informed as we share more information: https://bit.ly/30O9BQd

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 19, 2021 - 14:36

My friend recently passed away being hit by a train here in Toronto. What safety measures are being put in place or considered while noise reduction is being touted

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 23, 2021 - 10:20

We are so sorry to hear of the passing of your friend, please accept our condolences.

Safety is crucial at Metrolinx, including for the Ontario Line. We would not design or operate a service that was not safe for our customers, our communities, or our employees. The Ontario Line will feature remotely operated trains that run on an automatic signalling system and have been adopted by subway systems around the world, including those in Vancouver, London, Paris and Singapore. We will use the latest signalling and monitoring technology. This system will ensure trains are in constant communication with one another so their precise location is known at all times, meaning vehicles always stay a safe distance from one another. With sensors that can detect objects on the tracks, trains will also automatically stop if there is something blocking the way. Moreover, train doors will automatically open and close in sync with platform edge doors that will be installed at all stations, keeping both passengers and objects safely separated from moving vehicles.

Anonymous's avatar

If not, then exactly how many GO Conections are there for the Ontario Line?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 29, 2021 - 17:09

Thanks for your question.

Although the Gerrard station will not provide any GO connections, there will be local connections to the 506 Carlton TTC streetcar and 72 Pape TTC bus.

Enabling transit connections is important  the Ontario Line will have connections to three different GO train services – Lakeshore West, Lakeshore East and Stouffville. These connections will be possible at the Ontario Line stations serving Exhibition and East Harbour.

Learn more about the 40+ proposed transit connections to other transit options the Ontario Line will enable on our website.

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 25, 2021 - 23:49

Can't you have at least one underground station with side platforms? And I suggest that Moss Park, should have side platfroms

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 29, 2021 - 17:07

Thank you for the suggestion.

Design for the Ontario Line stations are still ongoing, and we look forward to sharing initial station design concepts for the downtown stations soon, including Moss Park. We’d like to better understand your question. Please email us at [email protected].

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Mar 25, 2021 - 23:51

will the trains be similar to the Toronto Rocket

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 29, 2021 - 17:08

Hi there,

The Ontario Line train technology will be different from the trains used by the TTC in a few ways:

  • Ontario Line trains will be smaller, electrified and use the latest technology so they will result in less noise than what we are used to from the TTC trains.
  • They will be fully automated with modern signalling like proven systems in Vancouver, London, Paris, Shanghai and Singapore.
  • Ontario Line trains will be able to run as frequently as every 90 seconds, allowing customers to avoid long wait times so they can get moving right away.
  • The trains will use regenerative braking to stop quietly and precisely, with platform screen doors that open and close in sync.

All this means that the Ontario Line will deliver faster, more reliable and more frequent service using technology that has been adopted by higher order transit systems around the world.

Read more about the Ontario Line on our website.

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 26, 2021 - 09:43

Will the Ontario Line ever be extended to Don Mills station at Line 4 once phase one of this line is complete

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 29, 2021 - 17:11

With currently available funding, the route Metrolinx is advancing includes 15 stations between Exhibition and Ontario Science Centre, with no plans to extend further north to Don Mills Station.  That being said, tail tracks will be laid north of the Ontario Science Centre station to protect for future expansion north, should additional funding be made available.

The proposed Ontario Line route was selected with a view to making the best use of available funding to increase access to transit, maximize ridership, achieve travel time savings, reduce overcrowding on existing transit services and create better access to jobs. You can read more about the planning rationale for the current Ontario Line route in our Preliminary Design Business Case.

If you have not yet, consider signing up for our e-newsletter so you receive all the latest updates on the Ontario Line project.

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 27, 2021 - 16:34

What environmental assessments have been completed now that there is a new alignment that goes right through a neighbourhood?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 30, 2021 - 11:29

We are still in the process of conducting a robust environmental assessment process for the Ontario Line. Last year, we shared the Final Environmental Conditions Report which established a baseline which will be used to measure impacts. We are currently in the midst of conducting studies to develop Early Works Reports, for specific areas where advance construction will start, and the Environmental Impact Assessment Report, which will look at all the impacts of the project from construction through operation as well as the measures that will be put in place to address those impacts. We look forward to sharing more information that will help communities understand the look and feel of the Ontario Line in their neighbourhoods. Before any construction begins, there will be opportunities for communities to provide feedback as draft reports are released.

To learn more, consider reading our article on environmental assessments and the Ontario Line here: bit.ly/3u8J6l5.

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 28, 2021 - 19:48

We hope the protests in Leslieville will not put pressure on you to cut back or cheapen Flemingdon and Thorncliffe to spend more to please one loud neighbourhood. The idea isn't perfect here either but we need both Flemingdon and Thorncliffe stops. We really depend on transit up here and need Ontario Line for new job options to lift up our community and quality of life.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 30, 2021 - 11:28

We want to work with every neighbourhood along the Ontario Line route to weave the project into the fabric of their neighbourhood.

We are advancing the plan with stations in Thorncliffe Park and Flemingdon Park because it provides much-needed relief to the existing transit system and help people across the city get where they need to be faster and easier. As you may know, the Ontario Line is projecting a daily ridership of 388,000. Many of those trips will be taken from communities like Thorncliffe Park and Flemingdon Park, where so many people are in need of rapid transit options. A trip from Thorncliffe Park to downtown will go from 40 minutes today to 25 minutes with the Ontario Line.

We look forward to hearing feedback from your neighbours and you as we move forward with the Ontario Line. There will be a presentation and live Q&A coming up for each of the segments of the Ontario Line, including the Thorncliffe Park, Flemingdon Park, and Science Centre stations so consider signing up for our e-newsletter to receive all the latest updates.

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 29, 2021 - 14:38

Will Colgate Avenue full of it's historic homes some close to a 100 years old since to exist? If not, you will
have a fight on your hands so this is very old part of Toronto they are planning on bulldozing over and this will completely change the city of Toronto and it's heritage.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Mar 30, 2021 - 11:27

Firstly we do not anticipate any impacts to properties on Colgate Avenue. We recognize that people’s neighbourhoods and parks are very important to them and try to avoid impacting private property as much as possible. In Leslieville and Riverside, running the Ontario Line on a Metrolinx-owned railway corridor that already exists means we can avoid major excavations and dozens of utility disruptions elsewhere in the community, which would have had major impacts on homes and businesses.

We will be coordinating previously announced GO expansion work with Ontario Line construction to avoid multiple disruptions in your community while still containing our work to the existing rail corridor – staying almost entirely within its current footprint. We will be sharing more information about the project in the coming weeks and releasing the Joint Corridor Early Works Report and Environmental Impact Assessment Report is prepared in Fall 2021 and early 2022 respectively. The studies that are included in this report will give the community a better understanding of the full range of anticipated impacts and associated mitigation options. We look forward to sharing more information, including these reports, with the community. You can read more here.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Mar 30, 2021 - 15:48

Since Leslieville station will not connect to GO, will the Ontario Line tracks ever be separated with the GO tracks in the middle while servicing side platforms

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 5, 2021 - 11:20

In the shared rail corridor and the station serving Leslieville, there will be a dividing wall and the tracks will be separated.

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 30, 2021 - 17:05

will the trains be light metro?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 12, 2021 - 08:34

The Ontario Line will not use light metro or LRT vehicles – it will use subway vehicles that are more in line with those used in Vancouver, Copenhagen and Paris. They will be driverless and have a higher compacity compared to LRT vehicles. The Ontario Line will use an Overhead Contact System (OCS) or Overhead Conductor Rail (OCR) to support the electrification of the project, and the type of technology or system used will be identified by the successful bidder. If you have not already, consider signing up for our e-newsletter to receive all the latest updates more here.

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 30, 2021 - 17:08

Will this line have overhead catenary wires and platforms screen doors like the future Montreal REM

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 12, 2021 - 08:35

We are learning from Canadian transit projects such as Canada Line in Vancouver, or the REM in Montreal, and we are also looking at other countries to learn from best practices.

One of the RFPs currently in-market for the Ontario Line is the Rolling Stock, Systems, Operations and Maintenance (RSSOM). Part of this package requires bidders to design, supply, operate and maintain the Ontario Line trains according to key output requirements set by Metrolinx. The Ontario Line will use an Overhead Contact System (OCS) or Overhead Conductor Rail (OCR) to support the electrification of the project, and the type of technology or system used will be identified by the successful bidder.

That being said, there are requirements for the trains to be fully electric and use a dedicated signalling system, equipped with the latest monitoring technology. This system will also ensure train doors automatically open and close in sync with platform edge doors that will be installed at all stations, keeping both passengers and objects safely separated from moving vehicles.

Anonymous's avatar
Mar 30, 2021 - 17:16

will the stations at Osgoode, Queen, Pape and Science Centre on this line have the same tile and font and signage just like the TTC stations i mentioned?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 5, 2021 - 11:19

Detailed design and planning work is still underway to determine station aesthetics and wayfinding. Throughout this process, we are working closely with our partners at the TTC to ensure our services complement one another and provide the best customer experience.

Each station will be carefully integrated within the neighbourhood where it is located. Input from residents, area businesses and BIAs will be sought out as design continues. We look forward to sharing initial station design concepts for public feedback later this year.

Anonymous's avatar
Apr 6, 2021 - 19:41

Do you think Queen-Spadina Station might be named Alexandra Park Station?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 12, 2021 - 08:36

It is too early to commit to any final names of the stations at this moment. A process to determine all of the Ontario Line station names is still being determined with our partners at the TTC. Once that process is determined, we will share it with the community.

Anonymous's avatar
Apr 8, 2021 - 09:28

I am generally pleased with the alignment through Thorncliffe area. If you want to offer the community an alternative, the only one I could consider would be to construct using cut-and-cover about 200m south-east of Overlea Blvd. This included a park, a laneway, and possible a parking garage on the east side which may or may not make this proposal infeasible. It would then come out elevated above Seton Park and continue elevated above Don Mills.
Anyway, the additional cost of cut-and-cover over elevated may not be exorbitant, so perhaps the cost savings to pay for this can be found elsewhere.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 12, 2021 - 08:36

Thanks for the suggestion. Due to the geography in this area of the city, we would need to tunnel very deeply to get in and out of these areas. As you identified, there would also be an increased property impact and longer construction timelines. Metrolinx will continue to work with communities to ensure designs are sensitive and respectful of the neighbourhoods the Ontario Line runs through and that measures are in place to address noise or vibration impacts, where necessary.

We are holding a virtual town hall on Thursday, April 15 to cover topics and questions related to area surrounding the maintenance and storage facility and the areas of Thorncliffe Park and Flemingdon Park. To learn more, read our recent blog.

Anonymous's avatar
Apr 8, 2021 - 09:52

Now that the cross-platform transfer has been abandoned, will Metrolinx consider alternatives that may make both sides happy.
Riverside/Leslieville want the subway underground. Metrolinx wants to control costs.
There is another way.
Follow roughly the RL alignment out of downtown, tunnel under the Don River and have the Broadview station a bit south of where the RL plan had it. This station, or immediately east of it, would become the TBM launch site. Then continue east along Eastern Ave. (actually about 50m south of Eastern) using cut-and-cover. This allows the line to go over the Carlaw sanitary sewer. Starting near Carlaw, make the curve to the north and continue with cut-and-cover through Queen station to Pape and up to Don Valley, where is would bridge across the valley.

Benefits to Metrolinx: 1) cut-and-cover saves more than enough money to pay for TBM to Broadview. 2)
get fully grade-separated line south of Pape. 3) maintains flexibility for expansion of the GO corridor if needed. 4) much shallower Gerrard Station (and and no OL tracks in GO corridor) make this another possible OL/GO interchange. 5) many stations are shallower, making it more convenient for riders to get from street to platform, increasing it's use. 6) provides community a means of achieving their goals.

Benefits to Community: 1) achieves goal of having transit line underground. 2) shallower stations at Pape, Cosburn mean shorter construction disruption. 3) get a station farther into Leslieville. 4) All stations 15m depth maximum, making it convenient to access platforms from street level. 5) additional benefits if Gerrard GO platform added.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 12, 2021 - 08:38

Re-positioning of the Ontario Line tracks in the rail corridor means customers using Ontario Line or GO services will be able to easily transfer from one line to the other by using the proposed shared concourse at East Harbour without having to leave the station. In addition, all Lakeshore East and Stouffville GO train services can stop at East Harbour– something that wasn’t possible with the previous design.

In reviewing design and alignment options for the Ontario Line, we have found that using the existing rail corridor in Riverside and Leslieville will help us minimize impacts to the local community and connect more neighbourhoods with higher order transit sooner. Tunneling the Ontario Line through this area would delay completion between 15 and 24 months – also adding to the length of time the neighbourhood would be disrupted by construction – and it would result in significantly more impacts to local businesses, homes and park space. With the options we are advancing, we can coordinate Ontario Line construction with previously planned GO expansion work while still protecting parks and minimizing the amount of private property required.

Tunneling under the Don River has a serious environmental impact due to the proximity of sensitive wetlands and the depth of tunneling required. If the Ontario Line were tunneled east of the Don River, all three stations south of the Danforth would need to be nearly 40 metres deep to avoid large sewer mains. That will add four to five minutes to customers’ journeys – discouraging people from using the Ontario Line. We will continue to refine our designs in the area to address the feedback we are hearing from the community.

Anonymous's avatar

As noted by many others on this forum and at community meetings --> Please avoid the crossover after the Leaside Bridge onto any part of Overlea Blvd. where there are several residents, community group services and businesses.

This is easily rectified by the many alternative options that have been already presented to Metrolinx including:

OPTION 1: Move the Ontario Line one block west to connect over Millwood to Banigan Drive which joins to Thorncliffe Park Drive (and the current new station location). → This change would avoid impacting any residential properties, or community service providers and would eliminate many of the issues noted above.

Given that you are planning to build the maintenance storage a little further east of Banigan...it would be a natural alignment to run the track over Millwood directly onto Banigan Drive, avoiding Overlea Blvd. completely. This small change would make a HUGE positive impact on the numerous residential, community services, and businesses that exist on Overlea Blvd.

• Option #1 would put the rail over ONE road (Millwood) rather than crossing two roads (both Millwood and Overlea),.
• This ensures greater safety, and less disruption from construction, for all who live, access services (and work) in this segment.
• Still easy access: People would rather take a 3-5 minute walk to the train, than have all of these health impacts associated with a train in the middle of a residential community...let alone on a small boulevard.
• It is more fitting that a major railway with fast speed trains every 90 seconds, run through industrial areas rather than impact any residential areas.
• There would still be easy access to the station at Thorncliffe Park Drive (west)

OPTION 2: MOST BENEFICIAL OPTION FOR THE OVERLEA –THORNLIFFE COMMUNITY IF THE LINE MUST RUN AT GRADE/OVER GRADE:

→ Move the alignment closer to the existing railway, running it along Village Station Road → Connect to Pat Moore Drive → Connect to Thorncliffe Park and relocate the Thorncliffe Station EAST, closer to where you originally had it, on the corner of Thorncliffe Park Drive and Pat Moore Drive. (Please see attached aerial.)

ADDED BENEFITS TO THIS OPTION #2:

• This option would avoid ALL negative community impacts and ALL of the issues outlined…including to all residential properties, to all businesses, to all places of worship and to all community service providers…it is a win-win for all.

• It would be more cost effective as Metrolinx could run much of the line at grade level, AND have the space to do so.

• It would put the rail crossing over only ONE road (Millwood) rather than two…This saves Overlea Blvd from the destructive impact of construction and traffic gridlock for several years.

• It is still easily accessible for the Thorncliffe community (the walk is a short 3 minute walk – one block west)…This re-location of the station would arguably gain better ridership as there are more apartment bldgs. on the east side of Thorncliffe Park Drive and hence more commuters. To be clear, residents along the south side of Thorncliffe Pk. (eg. 65 Thorncliffe, 47 Thorncliffe Pk. Etc.) will opt to take a bus to Pape Station and pick up the Ontario Line there rather than walk 15 minutes to anywhere along Overlea Blvd. If you are truly serving the ridership, it will be the residents living and working along Overlea Blvd. who would want the line moved 1 block west (3 min walk) and avoid the chaos of construction and a railway.

• It is more fitting that this major railway with fast speed trains, run through the northern industrial lands rather than in dense communities….and it would connect more easily to the rest of the Ontario line as it leads to the Flemington stop.

OPTION 3: Move the segment that crosses over the bridge underground until it reaches the Thorncliffe Stop (it is a short distance after the Leaside Bridge). This will be a life-saving measure for everyone who lives and works along Overlea Blvd. The elevated segment would run in the industrial land avoiding any negative impact to the community.

Toronto City Council recently voted in great support of putting this segment of the Ontario Line underground to avoid further disenfranchising an already at-risk community. This is an EQUITY issue....please support our community by opting for one of the aforementioned alternatives and avoid running an elevated track along any part of OVERLEA BLVD.

This area of Overlea Blvd. is home to thousands of residents and workers. Please ensure that transit growth is responsible, equitable and as Metrolinx says: “completed in a way that not only serves local transit riders, but also fits into the communities they call home". The current update with the Maintenance Storage Yard still DOES NOT SERVE THE COMMUNITY ....The alignment, as it still exists, is very detrimental, especially given that there are viable alternative options.

The harm caused by an above-ground rail on any part of Overlea Blvd. will be permanent, life altering, and felt for generations. Please listen and act on the community's feedback and alternative options...the new transit system is meant to improve the quality of life of those it serves not destroy it. We look forward to seeing some real change to the current alignment (avoid Overlea Blvd.).

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 23, 2021 - 12:28

The reason the elevated guideway is located along Overlea Blvd is so that the station can be situated at Overlea Blvd & Thorncliffe Park Dr. Analysis showed that moving the guideway and station further away, e.g. to Banigan Dr, would put hundreds of Thorncliffe Park residents out of walking distance to the station. The width of Overlea also allows us to make use of the deep front lawns on the north side of Overlea to place the guideway piers and avoid impacting the median that we know the community wants to protect.

The exact location of the curve at Millwood & Overlea was chosen to ensure that the passing trains are as quiet as possible; moving away from the corner would have required a tighter curve, which would increase noise and vibration. We know that the residents of 1 Leaside Park Terrace have concerns about the Millwood crossing. We have met with the board and we look forward to continuing to work with them and the greater community on potential options to address those concerns.

Anonymous's avatar
Apr 12, 2021 - 00:32

For both the Ontario Line and the Yonge North extension, Metrolinx aims to do as little tunneling as possible, and opts for elevated or at-grade routing as much as possible. That causes grievances in some of the affected communities, but reduces the construction costs.

If so, then why doesn't Metrolinx consider a fully elevated Eglinton West route? Eglinton West is a wide, nearly straight arterial, where a light rail guideway can fit easily. There would be no need to expropriate any properties, relocate anything (in contract to the elevated sections of Ontario Line), or tunnel under the houses (case of Yonge North / Royal Orchard community).

Maybe, a short tunnel is needed between Martin Grove and just west of Hwy 427, in order to clear the Hydro transmission lines and the 427. But what is the justification for tunneling between Royal York and Martin Grove?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 13, 2021 - 08:20

Every infrastructure project is different and therefore requires a different approach. Costs are one factor in a matrix of considerations when deciding which route and range of construction approaches is best for each individual project. Any decisions we make are in the interest of improving the customer experience, increasing access to transit, maximizing ridership, minimizing community impacts, achieving travel time savings, and creating better access to jobs.

At Metrolinx, we complete business cases to set out the rationale for why an investment should be made to solve a problem. They provide evidence to decision-makers, stakeholders, and community members so we can make transparent, evidence-based decisions about a project. So far, we have released an Initial Business Case for the Ontario Line as well as a Preliminary Design Business Case. A Full Business Case will follow.

To access the business cases for the Ontario Line, Eglinton West Extension and the Yonge North Subway Extension, click here.

Anonymous's avatar

Just curious, does Metrolinx plan to engage in public "consultations" about this Corktown Stop / East Harbour Transit Hub before or after it signs contracts with developers? Will there be any real engagement with the surrounding communities over these plans or will Metrolinx follow its past practice of presenting plans as a fait accompli and refusing to consider any alternatives?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 16, 2021 - 17:08

Infrastructure Ontario is exploring opportunities to create transit-oriented communities at future station locations throughout our subway program. The only proposed Ontario Line stations that are excluded from consideration as transit-oriented communities sites at this time are Osgoode, Queen, Moss Park and Leslieville.

As part of Ontario Line plans, Metrolinx is making progress on stations to serve Corktown and East Harbour. The Government of Ontario through Infrastructure Ontario will be leading the Transit Oriented Communities for these areas and will host public consultations with local communities, Indigenous partners and stakeholders starting in the Summer and Fall of 2021.

Transit Oriented Communities will involve collaboration between communities, municipalities and developers in order to deliver benefits for all individual, families and businesses in the GTA. To learn more, please read the Province of Ontario’s news release here.

 

Anonymous's avatar
Apr 18, 2021 - 18:31

The drawing for the proposed MSF and yard shows both the mainline tracks and the access links to the MSF as crossing Beth Nealson Drive. I assume that all of this structure will be elevated. How much of the trackage at the MSF and yard will be elevated, how much at grade, and where is the transition?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 23, 2021 - 12:29

The mainline tracks between Thorncliffe Park and Flemingdon Park stations will be elevated, while the MSF yard tracks will be at grade. The access links to the MSF that cross Beth Nealson will be grade-separated from the road. We are exploring options for what that grade separation will look like and we will report back to the community as soon as we have more information to share.

Anonymous's avatar
Apr 20, 2021 - 21:45

Are the station names firmly decided now? On the map, the station called Science Centre is now actually a long way by foot, across two extremely busy, wide and dangerous streets, from the centre. The closest station is actually Flemingdon. I can foresee many, many people unwittingly getting off at Eglinton (north east) and having to walk all the way back, with kids and strollers. Should the stations not be renamed?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 23, 2021 - 12:28

Most of the Ontario Line station names are placeholders and will be open to community input for final naming, but the Eglinton Crosstown’s Science Centre station was named after extensive community consultation and will not change. The Ontario Line station at Don Mills & Eglinton will therefore also be called Science Centre. Science Centre station will have two entrances connected by an underground passage, similar to many Line 1 stations: one entrance will be on the northeast corner of Don Mills & Eglinton, and one will be on the southwest corner. We will have more detailed maps showing entrance locations on Neighbourhood Updates - North very soon.

The Ontario Science Centre’s main entrance will be about a 5 minute walk from both Science Centre station’s southwest entrance and Flemingdon Park station’s entrance, and there are many options we are considering to make the public realm underneath the elevated guideway into a pleasant, inviting space for pedestrians coming from either direction. We will present these public realm options for community input when we have more details.

For pedestrians who do end up crossing Don Mills & Eglinton aboveground, it’s worth noting that the intersection is being redesigned by the City of Toronto as part of their Don Mills Crossing Secondary Plan.

Anonymous's avatar
Apr 27, 2021 - 14:29

How can an elevated station connect to an underground station ?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Apr 30, 2021 - 09:36

The elevated Science Centre Ontario Line station will be connected to the underground Eglinton Crosstown station via stairs, escalators, and elevators, and the stations will share their street-level entrances and exits. We will share more information about what the full interchange station will look like as designs progress.

Anonymous's avatar
Apr 30, 2021 - 18:36

Shouldn’t the ambient noise study consider hours after 6pm? After all, it’s in the generally much quieter evening hours that incremental noise from the Ontario Line will be most noticeable. A baseline assessment for those hours seems essential to me.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 14, 2021 - 10:01

When we measured ambient noise levels as part of the Environmental Conditions Report released last year, we collected noise measurements during the daytime, evening, and night-time using continuous recording. You can find the methodology and results of these baseline studies in section two (page 7) of the Baseline Noise Conditions Study in the Environmental Conditions Report. Our noise and vibration studies will feed into an Environmental Impact Assessment Report that will be released for public review in early 2022. More about our environmental assessment process here.

Once the Ontario Line is operational, our goal is for there to be no change in the amount of noise or vibration that people experience compared to now, and we’re studying the best methods available to ensure that. We will also use technology like rail dampers for the tracks, which will help the trains run quietly and prevent vibration from extending out into the ground. You can read more about the technologies we’ll use on Metrolinx News.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
May 11, 2021 - 16:19

Will all the subway stations be universally accessible ?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 14, 2021 - 10:03

Yes, all the stations on the Ontario Line will meet or exceed AODA guidelines. You can read more about our commitment to accessibility here.

Anonymous's avatar
May 11, 2021 - 16:32

Hold on. You can't have a proposed GO station and a proposed TTC station with the same name, and yet they both do not CONNECT to EACH OTHER!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 14, 2021 - 10:03

The station names for the Ontario Line are placeholders. Names will be determined at a later date with opportunity for community input. It’s also important to note that the Ontario Line’s station at Gerrard & Carlaw will not be a GO station.

Anonymous's avatar

The report includes Table ES-1: Relevant Baseline Noise Measurement Data, setting out baseline noise measurements from Erin Street (which runs along my building) -- but proceeds to compare apples and oranges by following it with Table 5-1: Construction Noise Prediction Results, in which Erin Street is not mentioned. Why have you not identified "baseline" and "prediction" noise measurements for the same specific locations?

Second, the report makes no mention of 90 Trinity Street by name, despite it being closer to the Corktown Station site than many of the other residential addresses specifically cited. Did Metrolinx neglect to include 90 Trinity in an oversight? Or, if it was deliberate, why was that decision made?

Anonymous's avatar

Has Metrolinx considered value added initiatives within the Ontario Line project?

My question relates specifically to the proposed viaduct over the Don Valley as it emerges from a tunnel portal between Cosburn and Thorncliffe Park, however more initiatives could be considered throughout the project. With the recent hype regarding projects such as the Rail Deck Park, ideas to transform abandoned rail lines/bridges to parks, all referencing the ever-popularized High Line in New York, perhaps this viaduct is a way of adding value to the proposed design.

Given a structure is required for the Ontario Line tracks, perhaps there is a net benefit to consider a pedestrian thoroughfare - possibly above the railway. Details regarding technical feasibility and overall integration would need to be established. In principle however, this would allow for improved bike/pedestrian connectivity between neighbourhoods and create a public space that would form a destination in its own right. It provides a safer and more appealing route for pedestrians and bikes compared to the Millwood overpass and would offer a viewing platform of dramatic sunset views over downtown as well as a great location to view the autumn leaves over the Don Valley. This would surely be a popular attraction that would generate off peak ridership beyond commuting that would support the business case.

Full disclosure: I work in the rail and transit industry and the views expressed are my own and do not express the views or opinions of my employer.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 31, 2021 - 08:21

Thank you for your suggestion. We will pass it along to the project team for consideration.

Anonymous's avatar
May 19, 2021 - 21:10

The plan for the maintenance facility shows that it will occupy a portion of Banigan Drive which is a dead end street. What are the plans for access to the buildings that remain on Banigan Drive?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 31, 2021 - 08:25

We are working with the City of Toronto on options for a new access road to Banigan Drive. This new road would be built before the existing access is removed. We encourage businesses located on Banigan Drive to contact us with any detailed questions.

Anonymous's avatar

Is there a way to see which addresses have received Notice of Application for Approval to Expropriate? It would be helpful to understand anyone in the market of purchasing or renting log term in the area.

Anonymous's avatar
May 30, 2021 - 19:41

Hi! Will the platforms include a future extension to 100 or 120m to accommodate rising demand.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jun 1, 2021 - 14:05

Detailed design and planning work are still underway for the Ontario Line, including for specific components like station platforms. After the project company has been selected through the procurement process to construct the line, we will have more detailed design and information to share. We anticipate a project company will be selected in 2022.

Anonymous's avatar
Jun 1, 2021 - 15:54

Bit confused with the footprint of Corktown Station overall. Initial Draft drawings seem to show a significant discrepancy in the above and below ground impacts.

The current Draft shows the underground platform spanning 100m on the EB side of Berkeley from King St. to about the middle of Front St. according to the photo on Page 10 of the below:
https://www.metrolinxengage.com/sites/default/files/appendix_b2-project_...

Yet above ground, there are indications of both North and South Sites east of Berkeley on either side of Front, with the South Site (including the First Parliament Site where there is no transit platform) spanning approximately 2x the distance further above ground (an additional 200m+ going South) according to the below:

(Early Works Components)
https://www.metrolinxengage.com/en/content/ontario-line-early-works-cork...

There is mention of: "A section of Corktown that is mostly paved over will become a place for the people, with a mix of housing, commercial, retail and community space around the station" in your blog below:

https://blog.metrolinx.com/2021/04/12/advancing-plans-for-the-ontario-li...

Given the South Site would be butting up against a neighborhood/school park and a much-traversed park through-way - can you please elaborate and help us understand what the above ground structural needs for both a North and South site are? How will this span either side of Front St. along Berkeley above ground?

Thanks,

Concerned Distillery District Resident.

Anonymous's avatar
Jun 7, 2021 - 23:49

will the trains have next station arrival screens like the streetcars, or colorful LCD screens like Montreal's future REM?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jun 7, 2021 - 23:53

Can Pape station have side platforms on both line 2 and th' Ontario line?

That way, Pape station won't have the same overcrowded business as Bloor-Yonge.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jun 7, 2021 - 23:55

when will the whole line open

Anonymous's avatar
Jun 8, 2021 - 13:58

I've received notification that our property title now includes notice of being within 30m of a transit corridor and that we now require Metrolinx authorization to do work on our property. I have 2 questions:
How long will this change to the title last?
How are the 30 metres measured?

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jun 9, 2021 - 16:53

Where do I get the most up-to-date drawings, particularly at the Carlaw/Gerrard intersection? This should be on the homepage, rather than pretty taxpayer-funded cartoons that don't say ----.

Anonymous's avatar
Jun 9, 2021 - 16:55

"It’s also important to note that the Ontario Line’s station at Gerrard & Carlaw will not be a GO station." Why not? If you're going to F up our landscape and neighborhood, the least you could do is provide us with a station closer than Main.

Anonymous's avatar
Jun 11, 2021 - 08:39

Besides Science Centre, which stations will have off-road bus loop or a off-road bus terminal

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Jun 11, 2021 - 19:09

is it best that Moss Park and Pape stations have side platforms only while the rest of the underground stations have center island platforms ?

Also, can Queen Station on the Ontario line serve not just a center island platform but a side platform on one side ?