> Davenport Diamond Greenway Community Conversation - April 28, 2022 | Metrolinx Engage

Davenport Diamond Greenway Community Conversation - April 28, 2022

Watch a video recording of the Davenport Diamond Greenway Community Conversation. 

Learn about the environmental benefits of plants, and pollinators, and how they support wildlife in the Greenway and surrounding communities. Panel of project team experts covered how yards, gardens, and other community spaces can positively contribute to neighborhood habitat and sustainability, as well as practical home gardening tips.

Please note this is not a project update meeting, which will occur later in the spring of 2022.

 

Agenda

7:00PM - 7:10PM: Introduction and Welcome

7:10PM: Presentation

  1. Project Overview
  2. Ecology of Habitats
  3. Plants and Pollinators
  4. Health and Resillience

7:55PM: Discussion  

8:30PM: End

Meet the Speakers

Josh Fullan

Josh Fullan

Community Engagement Lead, MFA, BEd, OCT, IAP2. 

Moderator

Luiza Sadowski

Luiza Sadowski

Senior Manager, Community Engagement 

Moderator

Kim Storey

Kim Storey

Architect, B.Arch., OAA, FRAIC.

Presenter

Todd Fell

Todd Fell

Landscape Architect / Restoration Ecologist, OALA, CSLA, CERP.

Presenter

Lisa MacTaggart

Lisa MacTaggart

Landscape Architect, BLA, OALA, CSLA, ASLA. 

Presenter

Lorraine Johnson

Lorraine Johnson

Native Plant and Pollinator Expert, Public Education.

Presenter

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

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Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 11, 2022 - 11:39

Some easy-to-grow container plants for sun include black-eyed Susan (Rudbeckia hirta) and pearly everylasting (Anaphalis margaritacea). Native grasses are also great for containers: little bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium) in sun and bottlebrush grass (Elymus hystrix) in shade. Another great container plant for shade is wild ginger (Asarum canadense). The North American Native Plant Society has a good list of native plants for containers on their website (https://nanps.org/wp-content/uploads/Container-gardening-NANPS-2016.pdf).

 

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Metrolinx
May 11, 2022 - 11:39

The construction of the elevated guideway began with removing all the existing vegetation and soils and organic matter greatly reducing the local population of invasives. The construction specifications of the Greenway will include measures to prevent the establishment of invasives such as using a nurse crop of vigorous annuals that will cover the soil surface and prevent invasives from taking root while the intended plants get established. There will be performance measures for the contractor to follow for an establishment period that will include monitoring and timely actions to prevent widespread establishment of undesirable species.

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Anonymous's avatar
Apr 28, 2022 - 20:08

how will you stop the plants from being trampled too much? are they going to be replanted every year if they don't come in again? how many years will they be maintained?

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Metrolinx
May 11, 2022 - 11:41

There will be measures to protect new plantings during the establishment period. Design measures will provide pathways at desire lines while carefully placed furniture, grading design that provides an easier alternative than through the plants and use of shrubby thickets to guide users to the desired route are part of our considerations in laying out the features within the greenway. Our hope is that the public will also become invested in the establishment of the pollinator landscape and keep dogs on leash and share the knowledge of the type of landscape intended for the space.

The beauty of this type of landscaping is just how robust it is once established.  We are specifying the “toughest of the tough” plants and a wide variety of different species. Some growing seasons will have conditions that favour one species over another. All species are perennial but will also set seed after blooming, many more seeds than will be eaten by birds. These seeds will colonize any bare ground available. Squirrels will “plant” seeds each fall as well.

The beauty of this type of landscaping is that it becomes a resilient self-sustaining ecosystem. The species composition will change year over year.

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Anonymous's avatar

Lots of canine neighours on my street

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Metrolinx
May 11, 2022 - 11:42

One idea is to place a large rock or log at a corner of the garden that will consolidate all the marking (or place to check and leave pee-mail) in one location and protect the plants behind them. Another idea is to post a sign in the garden that lets dog-walkers know that you don’t want dogs in the space (“Nice dog. Please keep them out of the garden.”).

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Metrolinx
May 11, 2022 - 11:43

Please watch our newsletter for an announcement of the date for the next public meeting which will cover this topic.

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