> Virtual Open House - Lindenshire Avenue Pedestrian Access | Metrolinx Engage

Virtual Open House - Lindenshire Avenue Pedestrian Access

Thank you for providing your feedback on the proposal for a pedestrian access to Maple GO on Lindenshire Avenue. This Virtual Open House ran from May 18 2020 to June 1 2020. We appreciate the time that was taken to provide us with your comments and concerns on this project. We’re currently doing our due diligence and reviewing public comments to determine next steps of the Maple GO upgrades. We’ll be sure to keep you posted on any developments going forward.

Open houses are an opportunity to get project updates, to learn more about your specific interests and to ask general questions. As we temporarily shift to virtual open houses, find below a PDF presentation of this spring’s virtual open house material. You can also download the presentation PDF by clicking the yellow button.

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Past Events

One open house was held in Vaughan on December 3rd, 2019.

Meeting materials can be downloaded below. If you require additional information or have follow-up questions, please contact us. 

Download meeting materials

 

Questions about this content? Submit them below and we will work to ensure questions are answered within 48 hours. Questions not related to this presentation? Contact us now.

NOTE: Conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in the removal of your submission.

For more information on what we’re building in York Region, find us at http://www.metrolinx.com/york or contact us as [email protected].

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar
May 21, 2020 - 10:12

Please provide more details on noise mitigation plans.
Is the grade separation at McNaughton going to stop all train whistling?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 21, 2020 - 13:47

As part of this project we will be installing noise walls along the berm adjacent to Lindenshire Avenue. You’ll see in our designs we’ve integrated plexiglass barriers along the proposed entranceway. This will provide clear relief for residents adjacent to our station site.

In addition, as you mention GO Trains are currently required to sound their whistles as they cross McNaughton Drive since it is an at-grade crossing. We are currently in the process of eliminating this crossing in favour for a grade separation instead. Once this is complete trains will no longer be required to whistle as they cross McNaughton. The Environmental Assessment for this project is currently underway. Have a look here for more information.

An exception to raise is CN freight trains that run on the Barrie corridor at times, which we do not control. Since these trains wouldn’t be stopping at Maple GO they’ll be required to whistle as they pass through the station. Whistles may be required to sound when there are, for example, safety hazards along the corridor. But in normal circumstances you will not hear whistling when our trains are passing McNaughton Road once the grade separation is complete.  

Anonymous's avatar
May 27, 2020 - 01:15

Get exercise....hmmm...wouldn't it make more sense to walk the extra 5 to 10 minutes and get more exercise? Just remember in approving this, there will be less exercise for the children and their families because your "go train cars" will now be occupying Lindenshire Ave.

Anonymous's avatar

You reiterate the same answers over and over again. You keep talking about traffic calming measures and how they work; meaning they work for your benefit. Our community will still have to deal with these traffic calming measures and that will be a huge downfall for all of us. You talk about working with the city of Vaughan closely meaning you are trying to figure out who to grease. There is ample access from Mcnaughton and Major Mackenzie so leave our quiet peaceful neighbourhood alone. The new pedestrian/cycling pathway along Mcnaughton was created for this reason. As for the steps up Major Mackenzie, the pedestrian bridge that will be built will eliminate the use for the stairs and will also be scenic? I am all for helping people with mobile issues but doesn't VIVA transit have programs that help them so there will also be a surplus of VIVA vehicles using this point as a kiss n' ride. The truth needs to be told. This is according to your needs, not the needs of our community.

Anonymous's avatar

You've answered:

"I absolutely understand your concern about more traffic in your area. I appreciate that this proposal represents a big change for many residents in the surrounding area. As I’ve mentioned to many of your neighbours, Metrolinx is working with the City of Vaughan on a plan to mitigate local impacts. For context, the access point on Lindenshire Avenue won’t open until approximately 2023. That leaves ample time to work with the community and the City on many of these issues, and it’s important to hear feedback like yours right now."

You've stated the access point won't open until 2023. That statement implies you have already decided to go ahead with this. So why is Metrolinx doing this song and dance? This whole thing is a joke. Nobody wants this except Metrolinx. Talking about Signs and Tickets are ridiculous. Those will do nothing. This is NOT for cyclists and disabled people. That statement is a sham. It's to create a glorified Kiss n' Ride at our expense. You may fool some of the people, but you are not fooling me. Nobody wants your Kiss n' Ride.

Anonymous's avatar
May 21, 2020 - 17:33

Do you want walk/cycle to the Maple GO Station through residential streets rather then on a major roadway? isn’t that extremely selfish and focusing in your own needs and wants when you already have access on both sides? you want cars to flood our neighbourhood because you want to enjoy your walk a little bit more??? talk about “it’s all about me” attitude! Have you thought about safety of the kids in this neighbourhood? probably not! Vaughan growing at the price of one peaceful and quiet neighbourhood that nobody seems to care about its people.

Anonymous's avatar
May 29, 2020 - 23:44

I've read all the comments and there is no way of knowing whether or not those supporting actually live in the community, not to mention I don't trust that Metrolinx having posted positive comments to support itself in this proposal

Anonymous's avatar
May 22, 2020 - 06:31

People who are on here who are against this initiative due to safety, traffic, privacy concerns please email me at [email protected]

Elena
Lindenshire and Denton Circle Peace Lover

Anonymous's avatar

Railway is a dead end residential street just south of the proposed access with a pedestrian sidewalk connecting Railway to Lindenshire.
This will create a traffic nightmare on our residential dead end road with drop off and pick-ups as well as parking for users of the train. As it is right now, the traffic at the west end of Railway street by the two doctors buildings, very often causes quite a delay trying to exit onto Keele. This will just add to the traffic issues.
This residential street being one of the oldest in Maple was not designed or built to handle this amount of traffic daily.
The advertised usage of the Western Pedestrian Access to Go is for pedestrians by foot or bicycles. We know that this might be adhered to by the very few residents that live near the access . The more dense neighborhoods not within walking distance, west of the Maple Go will be dropped off and picked up by a vehicle at this location, since it is closer than the East location. The East location has been purpose built to handle this traffic. There is no way that this will only be for pedestrians and bicycles, this is pure fantasy in suburbia.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 13:48

I understand your concern when it comes to increased local traffic and parking in the immediate community, and we recognize that this may happen at first once the access point is built. We are working closely with City of Vaughan staff on a plan to mitigate these local impacts as has been done in other similar examples across Metrolinx’s network. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits. That said, more can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

This is a common set up across our network, as many of our stations include access points that connect to residential streets in the community they serve. For example, Long Branch GO in Toronto has a direct pedestrian access point from one of its platforms leading to an adjacent neighbourhood. This station is on the Lakeshore West corridor, our busiest commuter line, which features all-day two-way service every 10 or 20 minutes during rush hour.

Similar access points exist at Mount Pleasant GO Station in Brampton and Danforth GO Station in Toronto, where the stations are adjacent to local communities and accessible via a pedestrian/cycling path that originates on a residential street. In these situations a common approach taken to mitigate local impacts is a combination of municipal by-law enforcement, local signage, urban design elements such as placement of road furniture and public education. In our experience, it works.

In addition, as part of this project we are also redesigning our existing Passenger Pick Up and Drop Off within the station site to accommodate vehicles in a more efficient and expeditious manner. This will further alleviate car usage along the Lindenshire access point.

As we look to upgrade our stations, a key objective is ensuring local residents have more options for accessing our facilities using sustainable modes of travel. We know that in its current condition there are clear challenges for commuters looking to get to Maple GO Station on foot. This is further made difficult for those in our community who have accessibility challenges.

For the communities west of Maple GO, the options are either to walk along Major Mackenzie Drive and up a set of stairs or around the station to McNaughton Drive. For this reason, we designed the pedestrian access from Lindenshire Ave to be integrated into the local community, encouraging local commuters to access our stations by modes other than drive-and-park. This would provide a safe and fully accessible connection for those in the local community west of Maple GO.

To your point regarding the potential usage of this access point by pedestrians and cyclists, collectively we are targeting for up to 40% of Maple GO passengers to access the station either by walking, cycling, and local transit by 2031.  We know from our experience with similar stations like Maple GO, that adding more convenient connections is critical to get to that number.  Based off of surveys conducted with GO customers, we’ve heard that barriers to cycling and pedestrian connectivity include convenience, safety, and the existence of good connections. In addition, as part of our scope of work here we are adding secure bike storage to Maple GO Station to further incentivize cycling to our stations. Together, this overall goal would greatly reduce overall traffic congestion in the area, as well as ensuring more passengers are able to get on the GO in more sustainable way.

That said, we are working to minimize the impact this entranceway may have on the community.  From our last public meeting in December we listened to community feedback: we altered the design to make it less intrusive, and altered our alignment so that it would not be situated in front of homes along Lindenshire Ave. Instead, our updated designs have relocated the access point to the intersection of Stonebriar and Lindenshire.

Anonymous's avatar
May 19, 2020 - 03:07

Does it make sense to make the station right in front of houses on a very narrow street?
This is not a condo village having security but a small house village.

Have you considered the safety problems of children who always play near houses and parking/kiss n ride situation due to many people and cars entering the village?

Please find another way.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 13:48

I understand your concern when it comes to increased local traffic and parking in the immediate community and we recognize that this could happen at first once the access point is built. We are currently working with the City of Vaughan staff on a plan to mitigate these local impacts. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits or contravene speed limits. That said, more can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

In addition, as part of this project we are also redesigning our existing Passenger Pick Up and Drop Off within the station site to accommodate vehicles in a more efficient and expeditious manner. This will further alleviate car usage along the Lindenshire access point.

This is a common set up across our network, as many of our stations include access points that connect to residential streets in the community they serve. For example, Long Branch GO in Toronto has a direct pedestrian access point from one of its platforms leading to an adjacent neighbourhood. This station is on the Lakeshore West corridor, our busiest commuter line, which features all-day two-way service every 10 or 20 minutes during rush hour.

Similar access points exist at Mount Pleasant GO Station in Brampton and Danforth GO Station in Toronto, where the stations are adjacent to local communities and accessible via a pedestrian/cycling path that originates on a residential street. In these situations a common approach taken to mitigate local impacts is combination of municipal by-law enforcement, local signage, urban design elements such as placement of road furniture and public education. In our experience, it works.

That said, we are working to minimize the impact this entranceway may have on the community.  From our last public meeting in December we listened to community feedback: we altered the design to make it less intrusive, and altered our alignment so that it would not be situated in front of homes along Lindenshire Ave. Instead, our updated designs have relocated the access point to the intersection of Stonebriar and Lindenshire.

Anonymous's avatar
May 29, 2020 - 13:59

Who actually wants this other than your corporate greed? We as a community have to do everything to prevent this. Everybody do what you can to not support this because Metrolinx is providing false information. Contact Marilyn Iafrate and Stephen Lecce about your opposition. Put up some flyers in the neighbourhood, canvass the neighbourhood, protest this ridiculous access point on Lindenshire. Metrolinx knows that due to Covid we are unable to come together as usual. They are using their corporate privilege to manipulate our community and they have been guilty in the past. Just look up Metrolinx in the Toronto Star and see what you get? They say they have done a survey but who as actually done this survey? Regular GO commuters that live nowhere near us? THIS ACCESS POINT ON LINDENSHIRE WILL BE ---- FOR ALL OF THE STREETS IN OUR NEIGHBOURHOOD. Lindenshire, Stonebriar, Falvo, Railway, Simcoe, Ontario and Denton will look like the lot at Yorkdale Mall during the month of December.

Anonymous's avatar
May 19, 2020 - 14:33

This plan to build an entrance will cause headaches to this neighbourhood. The streets. will be turned into a parking lot and the increased traffic will make the streets dangerous for this quiet neighbourhood

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 13:52

I understand your concern when it comes to increased local traffic and parking in the immediate community, and we recognize that this may happen at first once the access point is built. We are working closely with City of Vaughan staff on a plan to mitigate these local impacts as has been done in other similar examples across Metrolinx’s network. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits. That said, more can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

This is a common set up across our network, as many of our stations include access points that connect to residential streets in the community they serve. For example, Long Branch GO in Toronto has a direct pedestrian access point from one of its platforms leading to an adjacent neighbourhood. This station is on the Lakeshore West corridor, our busiest commuter line, which features all-day two-way service every 10 or 20 minutes during rush hour.

Similar access points exist at Mount Pleasant GO Station in Brampton and Danforth GO Station in Toronto, where the stations are adjacent to local communities and accessible via a pedestrian/cycling path that originates on a residential street. In these situations a common approach taken to mitigate local impacts is a combination of municipal by-law enforcement, local signage, urban design elements such as placement of road furniture and public education. In our experience, it works.

In addition, as part of this project we are also redesigning our existing Passenger Pick Up and Drop Off within the station site to accommodate vehicles in a more efficient and expeditious manner. This will further alleviate car usage along the Lindenshire access point.

Access Point Location

I wanted to give you some background on how we’ve decided upon this location for the entry point.

As we look to upgrade our stations, a key objective is ensuring local residents have more options for accessing our facilities using sustainable modes of travel. We know that in its current condition there are clear challenges for commuters looking to get to Maple GO Station on foot. This is further made difficult for those in our community who have accessibility challenges.

For the communities west of Maple GO, the options are either to walk along Major Mackenzie Drive and up a set of stairs or around the station to McNaughton Drive. For this reason, we designed the pedestrian access from Lindenshire Ave to be integrated into the local community, encouraging local commuters to access our stations by modes other than drive-and-park. This would provide a safe and fully accessible connection for those in the local community west of Maple GO.

We want to minimize the impact on the local community as much as possible as we work through design. We’ve worked with the local community and listened to feedback from the December public meeting to fine-tune the location of this entry point.  We altered the design to make it less intrusive, and altered our alignment so that it would not be situated in front of homes along Lindenshire Ave. Instead, our updated designs have relocated the access point to the intersection of Stonebriar and Lindenshire.

dkletz's avatar

Has Metrolinx and the City of Vaughan developed a concrete action plan to discourage/enforce against a “kiss n ride” situation from developing and an influx of cars parking in the neighbourhood?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 22, 2020 - 13:40

While Metrolinx is not the local planning authority and does not determine traffic regulation on municipal roads, we’ve been working closely with the City of Vaughan on a plan to mitigate these local impacts based on similar examples across our network. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits. That said, more can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

That plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we'll be in touch as these conversations develop.

Anonymous's avatar

I am not in favour with this opening at Lindenshire because I feel it will bring increased non-local traffic to the Stonebriar/Railway community and this is a concern regarding the large amount of young kids who use the dead end area of the walkway between Railway & Lindenshire to ride bikes and play on the streets.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jun 1, 2020 - 15:22

Thank your comment regarding increased traffic in the area. This is something a number of your neighbours have also raised in this engagement. We recognize that this may happen at first once the access point is built. We are working closely with City of Vaughan staff on a plan to mitigate these local impacts as has been done in other similar examples across Metrolinx’s network. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits. More can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

Based on our previous experiences with similar issues, that plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we will be in touch as these conversations develop.

Anonymous's avatar
May 28, 2020 - 06:22

What are you planning to do about the increased traffic to a calm neighbourhood of young families and retired couples?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 29, 2020 - 15:09

Thank your question regarding increased traffic in the area. This is something a number of your neighbours have also raised in this engagement.

To provide background, the installation of traffic calming measures would be up to the municipality’s discretion. Metrolinx’s role across the GTHA is to build transit and infrastructure through the region. That said, we’ve been working closely with the City of Vaughan on this project for some time. As we are in the early period of design and procurement on this project we are currently engaged with the City on a plan to mitigate these local impacts. We are playing our part and sharing our best practice experiences from other examples across our network.Based on our previous experiences with similar issues, that plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we will be in touch as these conversations develop.

Anonymous's avatar
May 21, 2020 - 01:47

This is very upsetting and disheartening news as you propose the building of the Maple GO station entrance at the South end of a very small and quiet residential street. There is no need for this entrance as people can easily access the GO from McNaughton and Major Mackenzie. This will be disrupting so many people and their families not to mention many children who find this area very safe and quiet to play in. Living near the ----de-sac is the very reason why we wanted to live here and raise a family away from the hustle and bustle. This plan interrupts everything and is being proposed at the wrong place. Why would you build on a quiet, small and closed off sub-division where families are peaceful and minding their business, whether we are older, new couples or families? This is not condo living where we need to have all these access points. We want our peace and are opposed to this plan completely! We say no!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 22, 2020 - 15:17

I understand your concern when it comes to increased local traffic and parking in the immediate community and we recognize that this could happen at first once the access point is built. We are currently working with the City of Vaughan staff on a plan to mitigate these local impacts. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits or contravene speed limits. That said, more can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

In addition, as part of this project we are also redesigning our existing Passenger Pick Up and Drop Off within the station site to accommodate vehicles in a more efficient and expeditious manner. This will further alleviate car usage along the Lindenshire access point.

This is a common set up across our network, as many of our stations include access points that connect to residential streets in the community they serve. For example, Long Branch GO in Toronto has a direct pedestrian access point from one of its platforms leading to an adjacent neighbourhood. This station is on the Lakeshore West corridor, our busiest commuter line, which features all-day two-way service every 10 or 20 minutes during rush hour.

Similar access points exist at Mount Pleasant GO Station in Brampton and Danforth GO Station in Toronto, where the stations are adjacent to local communities and accessible via a pedestrian/cycling path that originates on a residential street. In these situations a common approach taken to mitigate local impacts is combination of municipal by-law enforcement, local signage, urban design elements such as placement of road furniture and public education. In our experience, it works.

That said, we are working to minimize the impact this entranceway may have on the community.  From our last public meeting in December we listened to community feedback: we altered the design to make it less intrusive, and altered our alignment so that it would not be situated in front of homes along Lindenshire Ave. Instead, our updated designs have relocated the access point to the intersection of Stonebriar and Lindenshire.

Anonymous's avatar

Will bike boxes/ housing be installed to allow me to protect my bike?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 21, 2020 - 14:16

Yes, as part of our scope of work we are adding secure bike storage to Maple GO.

The existing outdoor storage in front of the station building will be relocated to the south side of the station and expanded. In addition, we will also be installing secure bike storage at the bus loop level. 

Anonymous's avatar
Jun 1, 2020 - 13:00

Doesn't this interfere with the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan? From my understanding that area lies within the border of the plan. Won't you be disrupting and hydrological and ecological systems? You will definitely disrupt a number of species. Anybody know a lawyer?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jun 2, 2020 - 15:45

Thanks for your question.

We recognize that sometimes the construction work we do has impacts on the local environment – it’s inevitable with any kind of construction.

When we complete construction works, we typically try to restore the local area to original conditions as much as possible. We follow vegetation removal protocols which would require us to replant according to City of Vaughan and TRCA protocols as applicable. As well, relevant wildlife considerations would be addressed during the environmental assessment process (in this case, during the Barrie Rail Corridor Expansion EA in 2017).

The Lindenshire access point is part of a larger contract: the Barrie Rail Corridor Expansion project. Some of that larger contract is located partially within the Oak Ridges Moraine Conservation Plan (ORMCP) area. Transit related development is generally permitted within the ORMCP area, with restrictions in certain designated natural areas and with the appropriate mitigation measures in place. Maple GO Station and Lindenshire Avenue fall within a “Settlement Area” under the ORCMP, which is defined as “areas designated for development of an urban type permitting a range of residential, commercial, industrial and institutional uses.” Metrolinx is permitted to build within a Settlement Area with the appropriate studies and mitigation in place that comply with Ontario regulations.

In fact, Metrolinx conducted extensive studies during the environmental assessment process and throughout detailed design phase for the access point and is carrying the recommendations found in those reports through into the construction phases of the project.

For further information on the ORMCP and the applicability to this project, please refer to Section 2.1.2 of the BRCE Environmental Project Report, Appendix A Natural Environment Report (EPR).

Anonymous's avatar

There will undoubtedly be increased danger to children with increased through traffic for passenger drop off and pick up.
Passenger drop off and pick up will undoubtedly create congestion throughout the entire subdivision.
Idling vehicles while waiting to pick up passengers will undoubtedly increase toxic fumes that are harmful to those with health concerns as well as the environment.
The actual construction itself of this access point will be intrusive as it will no doubt require heavy vehicles and construction crews to move up and down Stonebriar and Lindenshire for 2 years!!
Whether you want to admit it or not, the reality is that people will continue to drive to any available access point.
Note: As you know COVID-19 has ensured that businesses are adopting work from home practices that are expected to continue well into the future. It will be quite a while before everyone returns to work in downtown office towers, therefore, I challenge the claim that there’s going to be substantial ridership growth in the near future.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 26, 2020 - 14:26

Thank you for your feedback and I appreciate your patience on this. Many of your neighbours have shared similar concerns with us through this process regarding increased local traffic and parking. You’ll notice these comments through the Virtual Open House.

Metrolinx is not the local planning authority and does not determine traffic regulation on municipal roads. Having said that, we’ve been working closely with the City of Vaughan on a plan to mitigate these local impacts based on similar examples across our network. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave beyond the posted time limits. As you mention, the same came be said about the other streets that feed in and out of the surrounding community. More can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

This plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we'll be in touch as these conversations develop.

Construction Impacts

Metrolinx will take every effort to minimize impact on the local community as we complete infrastructure projects. This includes constant communication and notification of any disruptive work. The work that would go into the Lindenshire Ave entrance is one piece to many significant infrastructure upgrades that will be underway around Maple GO. We will be adding an additional track, a second platform, and building tunnels to connect our east and west platforms. Since these tunnels will already be part of our project scope, we’d only be extending slightly west to get onto street level.

 In addition to this work, we are also in the process of planning for a grade separation at the McNaughton Road rail crossing. In order to complete this work we are required to move forward with an environmental assessment for this project and other necessary pieces of infrastructure along our network. To view more information on this project I encourage you to visit our Metrolinx Engage page here.

As well, going forward we will be upgrading our infrastructure along the corridor to accommodate electrified service as part of the GO Expansion program.

COVID-19

Metrolinx continues to plan and build service to accommodate for the future growth of the GTHA. As such, we continue to work on our upgrades to achieve GO Expansion levels of service which will include all-day two-way electrified service across the network.  It is also worth noting this access point wouldn’t be operational until at least 2023.

Of course, we are monitoring the COVID-19 situation and as a first-line service we’ve been adjusting to adapt to this fluid situation. For one thing, we’ve changed our service model on the Barrie GO Line to only service our morning and afternoon peak periods. If you want to read more about how we’re responding to COVID-19 I encourage you to view here.

Anonymous's avatar

Does the design of Maple GO station allow the third track in the middle to be built easily in the future when ridership warrants?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 16:09

Yes, our current track and platform layout does take into account future provisions for a third track.

Pentrelli's avatar

How is it safe for residents or the postal worker to have access to the mailbox? Theft and vandalism will be a great possibility. Also there is a slight problem with littering near the postal boxes, this will make littering far worse even with the appropriate receptacles.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 21, 2020 - 13:49

Thank you for your feedback and flagging this issue for us. The existing Canada Post mailbox is around the location of where the tunnel would come out onto Lindenshire Ave. As we work through construction, the mailbox would likely need to be relocated to accommodate for the entryway. We’ll be working with the City of Vaughan and Canada Post to determine the next steps on finding an appropriate location for this.

In terms of maintenance and security, the property along the berm where the entranceway is located would be under Metrolinx purview. This would include frequent maintenance to ensure it is in tidy condition along with security monitoring via CCTV cameras.  In addition, GO Transit Security staff would also be posted at the station.

Pentrelli's avatar
May 19, 2020 - 15:32

Our privacy is being invaded on a large scale. You are building the site on a --- de sac and many people thrive on this area for privacy. I really enjoy how there is one car and one bicycle in your photo. In reality, this may happen between 2am and 5am.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 13:50

Through our design process we’ve kept a clear focus on ensuring we fit the character of the residential street and ensure we are as non-invasive as possible. For one thing, we’ve incorporated subtle lightning into the design to ensure light pollution is reduced for the surrounding community. In addition, based on feedback we received in our last public meeting we’ve reduced our overall footprint to ensure the entrance is blended in and not too prominent.  We’re also ensuring that the required CCTV cameras will be pointed away from private property.

On top of this, we’re actively reducing disruption in the community as we will be installing noise walls are part of this project along the berm adjacent to Lindenshire Avenue. You’ll see in our designs we’ve integrated plexiglass barriers along the proposed entranceway. This will provide clear relief for residents adjacent to our station site.

Anonymous's avatar
May 28, 2020 - 14:14

Besides the horrible traffic and safety of our children playing we will be susceptible to an increase in crime. Numerous studies have shown that the more secluded the neighbourhood is , the safer it is. As a community the neighbourhood watch is more attentive of who is coming and who is going. Numerous studies have shown that no matter what the area, as pedestrian and vehicle traffic increase, crime will increase! Some people may think well Maple is a safe neighbourhood so this won't happen to us? Well it is common sense, now people have access to view our properties and realize what is desirable. And throughout the years as more and more trains come, more cars and more people will come which inevitably leads to a higher possibility of crime. Not to mention the CRIMINALS NOW HAVE ANOTHER EXIT STRATEGY! I think it is ironic as I write this I have just learned about one of the most recent shootings in the GTA that occurred at Ted Reeve Arena near Main and Gerrard. It is located mere seconds away from the Danforth GO pedestrian access point. I work downtown and take the GO and I gladly walk by Mcnaughton. There is no guarantee that we will have downtown jobs and that I will continue to take the GO. What I do know is that I would rather have a safe secluded neighbourhood than spare a mere 5 minutes of my day. Come on people, let's save our community because I am pretty sure the reason we moved to this area was for the seclusion.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 29, 2020 - 15:09

As mentioned to one of your neighbours, safety is an issue we take seriously at Metrolinx. We’ve designed the access point to ensure it is well lit but also non-invasive for residents in the closest vicinity. As well, we would have CCTV cameras through the tunnel and the station itself is heavily monitored and maintained by Metrolinx with GO Transit Security staff posted at the station site.

dkletz's avatar

Can you provide examples of other GO stations with residential street access points that have successfully managed to avoid “kiss n ride” situations and parking problems from developing? What strategies were employed?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 13:46

Many of our stations across our network include access points that connect to residential streets in the community they serve. This is a common strategy we are implementing across our network to integrate our services to the local community and ultimately to encourage local commuters to access our stations by modes other than drive-and-park.

For example, Long Branch GO in Toronto has a direct pedestrian access point from one of its platforms leading to an adjacent neighbourhood. This station is on the Lakeshore West corridor, our busiest commuter line, which features all-day two-way service every 10 or 20 minutes during rush hour.

Similar access points exist at Mount Pleasant GO Station in Brampton and Danforth GO Station in Toronto, where the stations are adjacent to local communities and accessible via a pedestrian/cycling path that originates on a residential street. In these situations a common approach taken to mitigate local impacts is a combination of municipal by-law enforcement, local signage, and public education. In our experience, it works.

Anonymous's avatar
May 31, 2020 - 20:47

Does an eight year old come up with the planning? Besides the whole neighbourhood feeling an impact of the traffic did you even consider the residents living adjacent to the access? By you designing it at a three way stop is basically setting up a kiss n' ride so we all know that is the intention. The residents along Stonebriar from Denton and along Lindenshire from Falvo will experience their own rush hour traffic within their own community. What a joke. Might as well hire a traffic cop for the residents that live in the ----de-sac because all the vehicles will be parking and looping. Same goes for all of Railway. Instead of surveying your GO customers why not survey the residents from what I have just wrote about? See what you get? I am not in favour of any access but how do you come up with the south access? I think all your urban planners should be fired because we all know how the plans are truly being approved.

Anonymous's avatar
May 28, 2020 - 03:24

As far as I am concerned one extra vehicle in the area is one too many. Do you honestly think parking prohibitions, signage, speed humps and your street furniture will stop this extra vehicles? Speed humps may decrease the speed but will only increase the traffic with more vehicles. The sign on Ontario St with no turns between 7am-9am and 4pm-6pm doesn't work so it won't work here. Parking tickets may stop some people from parking but what about us locals? Available parking for our community will now be gone or get used to parking tickets. Get used to extra long days because leaving our subdivision or trying to get home will be a nightmare! With the excess of these Kiss n Ride cars trying to exit onto Mcnaughton from Falvo will be ---- and making a left onto Keele from Masters will take forever. So not only are we going to lose the safe play areas of our children, our local commute will suffer immensely. Metrolinx wants to create the amount of trains and service; that only increases our nightmare! Our community will suffer! Please think of the big picture, they are working according to their agenda, not our community.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 29, 2020 - 15:08

Metrolinx is undergoing a significant transformation of the Barrie GO Line and across most of the network to provide all-day service at 15 minute frequency or better in both directions. This is a network-wide project known as GO Expansion which will also have us run electrified service across core parts of our network. As this relates to Maple GO, initially we only provided service to both the morning and afternoon peak periods. Recently, we added off-peak and weekend service to the Barrie GO Line. Once complete, this project will add a second track and platform and will enable us to drastically expand our service.

With more service coming, there will be more traffic in the local area especially if the most convenient way to access our station is by driving and parking. To this end we need to ensure that our stations are as optimally connected to our communities as possible through sustainable modes of transportation. If our stations are only built to encourage driving and parking then it will only lead to more congestion, more delays, and fewer people taking public transportation.

 Overall, we are targeting 40% of Maple GO customers to access the station by public transit, walking, or cycling by 2031. We know from surveys of GO customers that barriers to cycling and pedestrian connectivity include convenience, safety, and the existence of good connections.

I’ve mentioned this point previously, but in its current condition, the set up at Maple GO does not encourage enough walking or cycling to get to the station. For the communities west of Maple GO, the options are either to walk along Major Mackenzie Drive and up a set of stairs or around the station to McNaughton Drive. This also applies to other subdivisions west of Keele Street which are certainly within walkable proximity but many opt to drive instead as the connection becomes even more circuitous from that point.

This is precisely why we’re proposing to install this pedestrian entranceway at Lindenshire Ave.  We are also installing a cycling connection at the bridge south over Major Mackenzie Drive. In addition, we are putting in place more safe and secure bike storage at the station. As well, we are expanding our bus loop to encourage connections to local transit. Put together, these connections would greatly connect the station to the community and ultimately this overall goal would reduce traffic congestion in the area, as well as ensuring more passengers are able to get on the GO in more sustainable way.

While I understand your skepticism about enforcement, we know it works to deter bad behaviour. As we’ve mentioned to a number of your neighbours, an effective plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we will be in touch as these conversations develop. As mentioned in the presentation, the upgrades to Maple GO including the Lindenshire access point would be open by Spring 2023. This would leave ample time to work with the community and the City on many of these issues, and it’s important to hear feedback like yours right now.

Anonymous's avatar
May 24, 2020 - 02:00

You say, "the options are either to walk along Major Mackenzie Drive and up a set of stairs or around the station to McNaughton Drive." You make it seem the walk is 5 km? It is a mere 200 to 300m. I live in the area and I gladly walk the extra 5 to 10 minutes so please don't humour us. Your main concern is ridership for profit and not convenience for the local community. The city of Vaughan just newly renovated a cycling and pedestrian path along Mcnaughton so what is the purpose of that? And for the avid cyclists that want to ride through a residential area as opposed to a main street. I think you can easily ride down Mcnaughton for less than a minute and take a left onto Falvo and enjoy your ride. I don't care what signage and/or speed humps are installed IT WILL NOT DETER ANY VEHICLES FROM COMING. I see drivers constantly turn onto Ontario St to access Railway. This is just a horrible idea for our subdivision.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 27, 2020 - 14:07

To prepare for all-day two-way GO service along the Barrie Line, our goal here is to optimize connections at Maple GO and reduce the need for many commuters to drive and park their vehicles at the station. By 2031, we are targeting for up to 40% of Maple GO passengers to access the station either by walking, cycling, and local transit.  To get to that target, for one thing, we’re proposing to install this pedestrian entranceway at Lindenshire Ave.  We are also installing a cycling connection at the bridge south over Major Mackenzie Drive. In addition, we are putting in place more safe and secure bike storage at the station. As well, we are expanding our bus loop to encourage connections to local transit. Put together, this overall goal would greatly reduce overall traffic congestion in the area, as well as ensuring more passengers are able to get on the GO in a more sustainable way.

While I appreciate you are willing to walk a further distance to access the GO Station, many, especially those with accessibility challenges, will either access via car or avoid public transportation altogether. We want to ensure that it is as easy as possible for customers and the local community to access our services.

To your point though, it’s not just about the existence of time-savings when it comes to choosing to walk or cycle – a large component is convenience of direct access. Based off of surveys conducted, we’ve heard that barriers to cycling and pedestrian connectivity include convenience, safety, and the existence of good connections.

Lastly, while I understand your skepticism about enforcement, we know it works to deter bad behaviour. As we’ve mentioned to a number of your neighbours, an effective plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, but also increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we'll be in touch as these conversations develop.

Anonymous's avatar

The most important question has not been addressed. How are you going to control the traffic and prevent people from using the the access as a kiss and ride point? This is a major concern because there are families with kids crossing the streets on their way to the park and/or school bus stops. The issue is not only that Lindenshire will increase in traffic but also the streets that leads to it from both the Keele St and McNaughton St. In your detailed presentation there is no mention of this issue being addressed. WHY???? This is extremely critical to stop the process in order to keep our streets safe by reducing traffic on residential streets. Think of our kids PLEASE! I am a GO train user and commute to work every day. I have been walking around to get to and from the station without any issues and have no problem continuing to do so. From my conversations with other neighbours they are of the same opinion. We ask you to CANCEL this initiative as the majority of us did not ask for this and are very much opposed to it.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 25, 2020 - 16:00

Thank you for your feedback and I appreciate your patience on this. Many of your neighbours have shared similar concerns with us through this process regarding increased local traffic and parking. You’ll notice these comments through the Virtual Open House.

Metrolinx is not the local planning authority and does not determine traffic regulation on municipal roads. Having said that, we’ve been working closely with the City of Vaughan on a plan to mitigate these local impacts based on similar examples across our network. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave beyond the posted time limits. As you mention, the same came be said about the other streets that feed in and out of the surrounding community. More can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

This plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we'll be in touch as these conversations develop.

I wanted to also give a bit of background regarding the proposal to build this western access point. As we look to upgrade our stations, a key objective is ensuring local residents have more options for accessing our facilities using sustainable modes of travel. We know that in its current condition there are clear challenges for commuters looking to get to Maple GO Station on foot.  While I appreciate you are willing to walk a further distance to access the GO Station, many, especially those with accessibility challenges, will either access via car or avoid public transportation altogether. We want to ensure that it is as easy as possible for customers and the local community to access our services.

Anonymous's avatar

To make easy for Go train customers, it will destroy residents life. You should make way to take a train from north side. then everybody can be fine. Such a bad idea to make it on such a small street in hometowns. I really don't understand that City of Vaughan allowed this.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 13:56

North Access

Currently there is a northern access point to the platform at McNaughton Road. The new western platform would not be directly connected to McNaughton Road but you’d be able to access the eastern platform via a tunnel and stairs/elevator.

Why Western Access Point

I wanted to give you some background on how we’ve decided upon this location for the entry point.

As we look to upgrade our stations, a key objective is ensuring local residents have more options for accessing our facilities using sustainable modes of travel. We know that in its current condition there are clear challenges for commuters looking to get to Maple GO Station on foot. This is further made difficult for those in our community who have accessibility challenges.

For the communities west of Maple GO, the options are either to walk along Major Mackenzie Drive and up a set of stairs or around the station to McNaughton Drive. For this reason, we designed the pedestrian access from Lindenshire Ave to be integrated into the local community, encouraging local commuters to access our stations by modes other than drive-and-park. This would provide a safe and fully accessible connection for those in the local community west of Maple GO.

We want to minimize the impact on the local community as much as possible as we work through design. We’ve worked with the local community and listened to feedback from the December public meeting to fine-tune the location of this entry point.  We altered the design to make it less intrusive, and altered our alignment so that it would not be situated in front of homes along Lindenshire Ave. Instead, our updated designs have relocated the access point to the intersection of Stonebriar and Lindenshire.

Anonymous's avatar

Metrolinx keeps saying that the 'residents' want this. Where is the documentation outlining this? You keep claiming this is for the 'residents' but I see no proof that it is. What was your sample size? 5 people? 5 people out of an entire neighbourhood is NOT for the 'residents'. I could care less about your issues of bottlenecking at the current Maple GO entrance. That was your poor urban planning that cause it. Now, to resolve the issue, you want to CONTINUE your poor urban planning by ruining OUR neighbourhood. Tell you what? I'll come by every morning before work and race through your neighbourhood and see how you like it. I'll be sure to fly by your children's bus stop as these GO commuters will be doing to my kids and my neighbours kids as well.

This is not for us, this is for your agenda and we will not accept it. You attempt to build it against our wishes and we will on the site protesting, causing it to shut down for as long as required.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 28, 2020 - 11:35

Why a Western Access Point?

First, I wanted to set context for why we are proposing this access point in the first place. In the backdrop of all of this, Metrolinx is undergoing a significant transformation of the Barrie GO Line and across most of the network to provide all-day service at 15 minute frequency or better in both directions. This is a project network-wide known as GO Expansion which will also have us run electrified service across core parts of our network.

As this relates to Maple GO, and as a nearby resident I’m sure you’ve noticed, initially we only provided service to both the morning and afternoon peak periods. Recently, we added off-peak and weekend service to the Barrie GO Line. Once complete, this project will add a second track and platform and will enable us to drastically expand our service.

With more service we need to ensure that our stations are as optimally connected to our communities as possible through sustainable modes of transportation. If our stations are only built to encourage driving and parking then it will only lead to more congestion, more delays, and fewer people taking public transportation. Overall, we are targeting 40% of Maple GO customers to access the station by public transit, walking, or cycling by 2031. We know from surveys of GO customers that barriers to cycling and pedestrian connectivity include convenience, safety, and the existence of good connections.

I’ve mentioned this point previously, but in its current condition, the set up at Maple GO does not encourage enough walking or cycling to get to the station. For the communities west of Maple GO, the options are either to walk along Major Mackenzie Drive and up a set of stairs or around the station to McNaughton Drive. This also applies to other subdivisions west of Keele Street which are certainly within walkable proximity but many opt to drive instead as the connection becomes even more circuitous from that point.  I appreciate you are willing to walk an additional amount of time to get to the station but many, especially those with accessibility issues will either drive or avoid public transportation altogether.

This is precisely why we’re proposing to install this pedestrian entranceway at Lindenshire Ave.  We are also installing a cycling connection at the bridge south over Major Mackenzie Drive. In addition, we are putting in place more safe and secure bike storage at the station. As well, we are expanding our bus loop to encourage connections to local transit. Put together, these connections would greatly connect the station to the community and ultimately this overall goal would reduce traffic congestion in the area, as well as ensuring more passengers are able to get on the GO in more sustainable way.

Increased Traffic and Enforcement

I absolutely understand your concern about more traffic in your area. I appreciate that this proposal represents a big change for many residents in the surrounding area. As I’ve mentioned to many of your neighbours, Metrolinx is working with the City of Vaughan on a plan to mitigate local impacts. For context, the access point on Lindenshire Avenue won’t open until approximately 2023. That leaves ample time to work with the community and the City on many of these issues, and it’s important to hear feedback like yours right now.

As mentioned to many of your neighbours, traffic calming measures, amending parking regulations, signage, by-law enforcement, and public education are all effective means to establish norms and deter bad behaviour.

Anonymous's avatar
May 29, 2020 - 12:21

To Metro link Transit,
Having lived in this area since 1980 we have seen many different proposals may of which did not materialize. This proposal is totally out of reality for the two areas involved. Living on Simcoe St. we will definitely be affected.
The project is dangerous (Lots of traffic) for the children in this area.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jun 1, 2020 - 15:22

Thank your comment regarding increased traffic in the area. This is something a number of your neighbours have also raised in this engagement. We recognize that this may happen at first once the access point is built. We are working closely with City of Vaughan staff on a plan to mitigate these local impacts as has been done in other similar examples across Metrolinx’s network. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits. More can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

Based on our previous experiences with similar issues, that plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we will be in touch as these conversations develop.

Anonymous's avatar
May 21, 2020 - 16:48

Several questions...
How will Metrolinx tackle the inevitable issue of increased traffic in already narrow streets or the increase in already too many drivers using McNaughton Heights as a shortcut from McNaughton to Keele Street and vice versa?
Was there consideration that 5 school buses and various school taxis come into this neighbourhood during rush hour every morning to pick-up school children and how this new access will affect them and their safety?
There are several vehicle break-ins & vehicle thefts in the neighbourhood. Don't you think creating additional access to the neighbourhood will also create an easier getaway for those committing those crimes?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 22, 2020 - 16:21

Thank you for your feedback and I appreciate your patience on this. Many of your neighbours have shared similar concerns with us through this process regarding increased local traffic and parking. You’ll notice these comments through the Virtual Open House.

We are currently working with the City of Vaughan staff on a plan to mitigate these local impacts. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits or contravene speed limits. That said, more can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

In addition, as part of this project we are also redesigning our existing Passenger Pick Up and Drop Off within the station site to accommodate vehicles in a more efficient and expeditious manner. This will further alleviate car usage along the Lindenshire access point.

This is a common set up across our network, as many of our stations include access points that connect to residential streets in the community they serve. For example, Long Branch GO in Toronto has a direct pedestrian access point from one of its platforms leading to an adjacent neighbourhood. This station is on the Lakeshore West corridor, our busiest commuter line, which features all-day two-way service every 10 or 20 minutes during rush hour.

Similar access points exist at Mount Pleasant GO Station in Brampton and Danforth GO Station in Toronto, where the stations are adjacent to local communities and accessible via a pedestrian/cycling path that originates on a residential street. In these situations a common approach taken to mitigate local impacts is combination of municipal by-law enforcement, local signage, urban design elements such as placement of road furniture and public education. In our experience, it works.

That said, we are working to minimize the impact this entranceway may have on the community.  From our last public meeting in December we listened to community feedback: we altered the design to make it less intrusive, and altered our alignment so that it would not be situated in front of homes along Lindenshire Ave. Instead, our updated designs have relocated the access point to the intersection of Stonebriar and Lindenshire.

Your concern regarding safety is well-taken. This is an issue top of mind for us as we work on any bit of infrastructure in our network. For one thing, we designed the access point to ensure it is well-lit while also non-invasive for the homes directly surrounding it. As well, we will have CCTV cameras posted at this entrance way but pointed away from private property in the area. Lastly, the access point will be maintained by Metrolinx and GO Transit Security staff is posted at the station site 

Anonymous's avatar
May 20, 2020 - 12:58

Hi,

I'm happy the station is getting renovated, thank you for that! I was wondering about the platforms, will the new and old platforms be raised with level boarding? I believe the raising of platforms was part of GO Expansion. Also, will the new Metrolinx Wayfinding standard be applied? The signage doesn't look like it complies with the new standard. I was also interested about renderings for the entire project, not just the entrance. Could you please tell me when they will be released?

Thanks for the help!

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 16:11

The existing platform will be upgraded with stair and elevator connections to the tunnels as well as some cosmetic upgrades.  Provisions for level boarding will be included in the scope of work.  As we complete these upgrades the new wayfinding standards will be used. In terms of further visuals for these upgrades, as we progress through procurement and award a contract we will be able to provide more detailed designs going forward. I encourage you to sign up to our distribution list at www.metrolinx.com/York to stay posted on further updates.

Anonymous's avatar

with convenient ways to connect the GO station via pedestrian access yet it doesn't seem like the local residents even want this so who is this corridor even for? Would you want to have your house right in front of a GO station corridor? How do we protect the local residents from increased non residents walking along our streets. CCTV will not protect us, what kind of security measures will be taken?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 22, 2020 - 16:18

Your concern regarding safety is well-taken. This is an issue top of mind for us as we work on any bit of infrastructure in our network. For one thing, we designed the access point to ensure it is well-lit while also non-invasive for the homes directly surrounding it. As well, as you mentioned we will have CCTV cameras posted at this entrance way but pointed away from private property in the area. Lastly, the access point will be maintained by Metrolinx and GO Transit Security staff is posted at the station site 

In terms of security, the property along the berm where the entranceway is located would be under Metrolinx purview. The installation of traffic calming measures or other measures to mitigate speeding and parking would be up to the municipality’s discretion. Metrolinx’s role across the GTHA is to build transit and infrastructure through the region. That said, we’ve been working closely with the City of Vaughan on a plan to mitigate these local impacts. We are playing our part and sharing our best practice experiences from other examples across our network.

As mentioned to a few of your neighbours, based on our previous experiences with similar issues, that plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we'll be in touch as these conversations develop..

Anonymous's avatar
May 20, 2020 - 21:29

If Vaughan wants investment and growth, we need to expand the options for residents to access public transit. This proposal is part of the solution to resolving the major traffic issues associated with a car focus planning agenda which we now know does not work. The focus is to move people away from the cars and provide them various options to walk and or cycle to their destination. The question that we really need to ask is do we have the courage to rise above "its all about me attitude" and make a bold decision to move forward for the greater good of Vaughan? I want to walk/cycle to the Maple GO Station through residential streets rather then on a major roadway. Progress is moving forward and we need these missing links in the transportation, to say otherwise is hiding your true agenda and contrary to the vision under the Vaughan Transportation Task Force. Vaughan needs these improvements and the majority must be heard.

Anonymous's avatar
May 25, 2020 - 22:58

Has the effects of Covid-19 been considered? With the increase in people working from home and universities and colleges moving towards online classes the number of commuters is likely to drop. Over the past two months there has been no more than thirty cars in the parking lot at one time. Is expansion of the Maple station needed?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 27, 2020 - 14:03

Metrolinx continues to plan and build service to accommodate for the future growth of the GTHA. As such we continue to work on our upgrades to achieve GO Expansion levels of service which will include all-day two-way electrified service across the network.  It is worth noting this access point and the upgrades to Maple GO wouldn’t be operational until 2023.

Of course, we are monitoring the COVID-19 situation and as a first-line service we’ve been adjusting to adapt to this fluid situation. For one thing, we’ve changed our service model on the Barrie GO Line to only service our morning and afternoon peak periods. If you want to read more about how we’re responding to COVID-19 I encourage you to view here.

Anonymous's avatar
May 21, 2020 - 18:09

As a member of this neighbourhood I would be fine with Metrolinx adding the proposed access point. I believe Metrolinx envisions this as a mostly pedestrian access point but I would agree with the rest of the concerns presented here that vehicle traffic could create some challenges. If Metrolinx does plan to go ahead with an access off of Lindenshire I think it would be beneficial to work with the City to implement some traffic calming features throughout the neighbourhood. If it's less convenient for vehicles they won't use it in large numbers and those who do will be "forced" to slow down.

If the goal is pedestrian access there is an existing path between Lindenshire and Simcoe to the south. Metrolinx could consider (assuming the City allows it) of installing another path to connect Simcoe to Major Mac. This would allow better access to Station Street via the stairs from Major Mac. This may still create some non local traffic but it isn't direct access to the platform which may deter some people. Additionally, building a path would likely be cheaper than a brand new access.

Anonymous's avatar
May 22, 2020 - 14:07

I'm not sure if the City of Vaughan was responsible for the idea of this access point, but sounds more like the neighbouring streets to Lindenshire (i.e. Stonebriar, Denton Circle, etc.) made enough complaints about the round about way to get to the station. Any other neighbourhood (west of Keele) would be forced to take a car regardless.

Of course the Stonebriar resident who made the comment above wouldn't mind an access point here - it's not in front of their house, so what do they care? And they also think it's a good idea to not let residents on Lindenshire park on the street? That's a tad silly. Anyone in Vaughan is allowed street parking for up to 3 hrs.

Despite this all, I can understand how it would make the commute SO much easier for the other residents here. I feel for them - we're all one community here, and I would probably like the idea too if I had to commute by GO, and if I didn't live on Lindenshire.

The only suggestion I would make - if anything we say is not going to stop it from being built, and only suggestions are being considered - is making this access point smaller. Maybe a single narrow tunnel underneath, or bridge above - I'm not sure. If you're making it an official, massive access point with all the bells and whistles, you're encouraging non-residents to use it, versus the people who really need to use it here. I feel sorry for the people of that ----de-sac, because they're going to be bombarded with a string of cars that are just picking someone up. Not to mention the kids who won't be able to play on the street, or learn to ride their bike in the very nice, quiet, open space.

If it's going to happen regardless of what anyone says, please make it a more subtle/smaller access point. Or give residents in this neighbourhood access cards that only allows them to access the door in and out. Maybe a silly idea, but there should be compromise somewhere.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 26, 2020 - 11:50

Thank you for your thorough and thoughtful comments. Your suggestion is well taken – in fact reducing the overall size of the entryway it is something we heard from a number of residents during the December public meeting.  Based on that feedback you’ll see we change the designs we originally presented to a much more minimal approach which includes a smaller overall footprint, a reduced promenade area, and the use of much more minimal signage. Going forward, this is something we are very mindful of as we’d like to fit the character of the surrounding area as much as possible.

Donna's avatar

Dear MetroLinx,

See my post below on May 20, 2020 -12:51

Kindly contact me/respond.

Anonymous's avatar

The documents from the GO Expansion shows a concept connection to/from McNaughton Rd and the west platform. Is it still the case?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 16:18

As part of this project we are not building a northern entrance to the station. The west platform will not connect directly to McNaughton Road, however there will be a tunnel just north of the existing station building that will connect the west and east platforms.

Having said that, we are in the process of planning for a grade separation at the McNaughton Road rail crossing. This grade separation would also include a multiuse path at-grade on the south side of McNaughton Road to provide a connection to Maple GO.

In order to complete this work we are required to move forward with an environmental assessment for this project and other necessary pieces of infrastructure along our network.

We began this process  with a series of public meetings in early 2020. We held a Public Information Centre at Vaughan City Hall on February 29 2020. 

To view more information on this project I encourage you to visit our Metrolinx Engage page here.

Anonymous's avatar

In or about 1997/1998 when the subdivision that includes Lindenshire and Stonebriar was being proposed, the developer had proposed that Lindenshire/Stonebriar be connected to Railway Street/Simcoe Street.

The residents of Railway Street and Simcoe opposed this, and thus only pedestrian access between Lindenshire/Stonebriar and Railway Street/Simcoe Street was approved and developed.

At that time Railway Street and Simcoe Street was being used as a kiss and ride for people illegally crossing the rails to get to the Go Train.

The residents of Railway Street and Simcoe Street were also concerned of the increased vehicular traffic as people would be cutting through to get home if Lindenshire continued through to Railway Street/Simcoe Street.

A no left turn from Major Mackenzie to Ontario Street was also implemented to prevent Railway Street from becoming a through way, versus drivers taking a right onto Keele Street from Major Mackenzie.

Cement stairs were installed on the east side of the rails off of Major Mackenzie a few years later to enable pedestrians to access the Go Trains without having to go around the cemetery.

What Metrolinx is proposing is contrary to what has been implemented to date, and is strongly opposed.

The first time I received notice of MetroLinx activities is by way of a notice I received in May 2020??? I would have involved myself from the get go, it I had been informed prior to May 2020.

There is to be no influx of use of Railway Street, and all necessary steps to ensure that does not take place must be implemented, including not introducing an access point to the Go Trains at Lindenshire and Stonebriar.

Access from Lindenshire/Stonebriar is overkill.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 13:57

Thank you for your patience as we’ve been reviewing your question and developing a full response.

Metrolinx is currently transforming the Barrie GO Line to provide for a significant increase in service. Initially, the Barrie Line only provided service to both morning and afternoon peak periods. Recently, we’ve added off-peak and weekend service as well. This project will enable us to run expanded electrified all-day two-way service along the Barrie Line and across our network. This suite of work is known as the GO Expansion program, if you’re interested in learning more I encourage you to view www.metrolinx.com/GOExpansion

With more service we need to ensure that our stations are as optimally connected to our communities as possible through sustainable modes of transportation.

As we look to upgrade our stations, a key objective is ensuring local residents have more options for accessing our facilities using sustainable modes of travel. We know that in its current condition there are clear challenges for commuters looking to get to Maple GO Station on foot. This is further made difficult for those in our community who have accessibility challenges.

For the communities west of Maple GO, the options are either to walk along Major Mackenzie Drive and up a set of stairs or around the station to McNaughton Drive. For this reason, we designed the pedestrian access from Lindenshire Ave to be integrated into the local community, encouraging local commuters to access our stations by modes other than drive-and-park. This would provide a safe and fully accessible connection for those in the local community west of Maple GO.

Specific to Maple GO, we are targeting for up to 40% of Maple GO passengers to access the station either by walking, cycling, and local transit by 2031.  We know from our experience with similar stations like Maple GO, that adding more convenient connections is critical to get to that number.  Based off of surveys conducted with GO customers, we’ve heard that barriers to cycling and pedestrian connectivity include convenience, safety, and the existence of good connections. In addition, as part of our scope of work here we are adding secure bike storage to Maple GO Station to further incentivize cycling to our stations. Together, this overall goal would greatly reduce overall traffic congestion in the area, as well as ensuring more passengers are able to get on the GO in more sustainable way.

Metrolinx is not the authority on local land use planning; our role is to build transit and infrastructure across our region. That said, we’ve been working closely with the City of Vaughan on this project for some time. As we are in the early period of design and procurement on this project we are currently engaged with the City on a plan to mitigate these local impacts. We are playing our part and sharing our best practice experiences from other examples across our network. That plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we'll be in touch as these conversations develop.

Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
May 21, 2020 - 17:42

Think about our kids’ safety and our streets being turned into a parking lot. Looking at the response on here the majority is strongly opposing this.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 22, 2020 - 16:18

Thank you for your feedback and I appreciate your patience on this. Many of your neighbours have shared similar concerns with us through this process regarding increased local traffic and parking. You’ll notice these comments through the Virtual Open House. We are currently working with the City of Vaughan staff on a plan to mitigate these local impacts. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits or contravene speed limits. That said, more can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts.

In addition, as part of this project we are also redesigning our existing Passenger Pick Up and Drop Off within the station site to accommodate vehicles in a more efficient and expeditious manner. This will further alleviate car usage along the Lindenshire access point.

This is a common set up across our network, as many of our stations include access points that connect to residential streets in the community they serve. For example, Long Branch GO in Toronto has a direct pedestrian access point from one of its platforms leading to an adjacent neighbourhood. This station is on the Lakeshore West corridor, our busiest commuter line, which features all-day two-way service every 10 or 20 minutes during rush hour.

Similar access points exist at Mount Pleasant GO Station in Brampton and Danforth GO Station in Toronto, where the stations are adjacent to local communities and accessible via a pedestrian/cycling path that originates on a residential street. In these situations a common approach taken to mitigate local impacts is combination of municipal by-law enforcement, local signage, urban design elements such as placement of road furniture and public education. In our experience, it works.

 

Anonymous's avatar

Based on the current car traffic along McNaugton. Drivers rush along McNaughton to get to Maple station and its safe to assume the same will happen along stonebriar and lindenshire. We have a neighborhood with many toddlers and young kids who play and there is concerns with speeding drivers who race along stonebriar/lindenshire using the west entrance. How will you control this and eliminate any chance of someone getting hit by a car?

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 20, 2020 - 13:53

Thank you for sharing this suggestion regarding the installation of speed humps. You raise a fair point as speed humps can be an effective solution to mitigate speeding and an increase in local traffic.

To provide background, the installation of traffic calming measures would be up to the municipality’s discretion. Metrolinx’s role across the GTHA is to build transit and infrastructure through the region. That said, we’ve been working closely with the City of Vaughan on this project for some time. As we are in the early period of design and procurement on this project we are currently engaged with the City on a plan to mitigate these local impacts. We are playing our part and sharing our best practice experiences from other examples across our network.

Based on our previous experiences with similar issues, that plan could leverage a number of traffic calming measures, which could include but not limited to speed humps, amending the parking regulations on the street, increasing bylaw parking enforcement installing proper signage, utilizing urban design elements (i.e. placement of road furniture) and deploying extensive public education campaigns. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we'll be in touch as these conversations develop.

Anonymous's avatar
May 29, 2020 - 16:05

I don't understand what all the NIMBY whining is about. I live in the area and would love the convenient option of walking to the station. If you're worried about parking then enforcement is the solution, but really so what if there's parked cars? It doesn't impact your ability to park on your wide wind swept driveway and garage. My real question is why's this going to take until Spring 2023 to be completed? No rush Metrolinx.

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
Jun 1, 2020 - 15:22

Our tentative schedule for the Maple GO upgrades would have a contract awarded in Winter 2021 with construction starting after this point. Note the Spring 2023 figure is not just for the Lindenshire access point, it accounts for a full suite of upgrades to Maple GO including a second platform, new track, expanded bus loop, and a cycling connection over Major Mackenzie Drive. In addition, as part of this contract we’ll be completing enabling works needed to increase service approximately between south of Major Mackenzie Drive and north of McNaughton Road, which include track signal work, noise walls, and corridor grading.

Anonymous's avatar
May 21, 2020 - 20:34

While I would love to see access on Lindenshire as it does cut down on the walk for those who live in this neighbourhood and commute on Go daily (such as myself), the only concern I have is the availability of parking. Seeing as there is already insufficient parking at this station and the parking lot is already full by 7:15, what will Metrolinx do to ensure the streets on this neighbourhood will not become a parking lot? I can see many people parking on the streets around this entrance and taking the train down as its much closer than the Walmart parking lot (which is currently being used by people taking trains after 7:40 am)

Metrolinx's avatar

Metrolinx
May 26, 2020 - 11:40

Thank you for your comment and your patience on this. Your question regarding increased parking in the area is something that many of your neighbours have also raised and your point is taken. We are working closely with City of Vaughan staff on a plan to mitigate these local impacts as has been done in other similar examples across Metrolinx’s network. City of Vaughan Parking Bylaw Enforcement will be engaged to ensure vehicles don’t park on Lindenshire Ave or other local streets beyond the posted time limits. In addition, the City of Vaughan could amend parking regulations on the street and provide further enforcement. That said, more can be done beyond by-law enforcement as proper signage and public education campaigns are very effective means to limit local impacts. We encourage you to stay engaged on this process and we'll be in touch as these conversations develop.

Ultimately, to prepare for all-day two-way GO service along the Barrie Line, our goal here is to optimize connections at Maple GO to reduce the need for many commuters to drive and park their vehicles at the station. By 2031, we are targeting for up to 40% of Maple GO passengers to access the station either by walking, cycling, and local transit.  To get to that target, for one thing, we’re proposing to install this pedestrian entranceway at Lindenshire Ave to encourage walking and cycling.  We are also installing a cycling connection at the bridge south over Major Mackenzie Drive. In addition, we are putting in place more safe and secure bike storage at the station. As well, we are expanding our bus loop to encourage connections to local transit. Put together, this overall goal would greatly reduce overall traffic congestion in the area, as well as ensuring more passengers are able to get on the GO in more sustainable way.

Anonymous's avatar

I'm reading the comments and many people are stating that the local residents are against this. I just want to add my comments to say I'm thrilled that this is being planned and I think this will be a huge improvement to the neighborhood. Many of us have "go train cars", this would eliminate that expense. Many of us will now get more exercise walking to the GO. We of course need to make sure this is done the right way, and all these comments are helping to ensure that. But, overall this is great! I do think many residents are supportive, but often with these type of projects, supporters stay silent and objectors are loud. Let's all work together to make sure this gets done the right way. Thank you Metrolinx for your efforts and for listening.

Anonymous's avatar

Hello, I want to start by saying I live on Stonebriar Dr and would be happy to see an access point for the GO train through the neighborhood. I don't currently commute downtown but may in the future and can see the benefits it would provide for me to not have to drive and to have a convenient walking route to the train. I also understand residents concerns with increased vehicle traffic and parking. I think a way that this could be avoided is if Metrolinx made entering at this location less convenient/slower than entering the actual station. You could add features to the roads in the neighborhood such as speed bumps to discourage people speeding down the road to get to the entrance or stop signs (mind you, residents who live on this street already speed down the road - I witness this daily). Human nature is going to want to take the easiest route possible, and if it can be through the station rather than this street that would hopefully deter people from using this street to drop people off. You could also add no turning signs into the neighborhood or add no parking or no stopping signs as well (though these would need to be enforced and, if any residents are parking on the street currently, then they'd be at fault too if they park on the road during the day). Overall I think Metrolinx has done a good job at making the entrance point as low profile as possible and I hope residents on my street can drop the "I want it my way or the highway" attitude and be open to increasing easier access for walkers and bikers within our community, potentially increase property value, and lessen the stress and emissions of driving everywhere.