> Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit LIVE - October 28, 2021 | Metrolinx Engage

Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit LIVE - October 28, 2021

Call-In With Your Question

As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we are adding a call-in option for tonight’s event. To ask your question by voice, join the Zoom meeting here. We aim to keep each question and subsequent answer to 3 minutes allowing for as many call-in questions as possible.

NOTE: please ensure you have the latest version of Zoom installed.

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Agenda

6:30PM - 7:00PM: Project Update

7:00PM - 7:30PM: Questions and Answers to Pre-Submitted Questions

7:30PM - 8:00PM: Call-in Questions

Presentation Materials

Meet the Speakers

Jocelyn Stenner headshot

Jocelyn Stenner

Moderator

Margaret Parkhill

Margaret Parkhill

Consultant Lead, Parsons/IBI Group

Photo of Kristin Demasi

Kristin Demasi

Senior Advisor Rapid Transit Project Planning

Uton Sam

Uton Samuels

Environmental Project Manager

Photo of David Phalp

David Phalp

Senior Manager, Community Engagement
Moderator

Photo of David Hopper

David Hopper

Consultant Lead, Parsons/IBI Group

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

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Comments

Anonymous's avatar

How many lanes will be available to local drivers on Ellesmere if buses have priority?

Does Ellesmere become a 2-lane road for the general public with 2 lanes reserved for Express Buses?
There seems to be a serious risk of producing gridlock for local traffic, especially in winter on these several hilly sections.

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:06

Increased transit service, which is also more reliable will help encourage more people to choose public transit for more of their trips, taking pressure off the roads as population and employment continues to increase.  In the section west of Morningside there will be two lanes in each direction for cars, as there is today, and the road will be widened to add the BRT lanes.  East of Military Trail the existing four-lane roadway will be maintained and the two center lanes will be converted to BRT.  East of Meadowvale the east end of Ellesmere will be widened slightly to convert the existing wide two lanes into a four-lane road with median BRT.

The traffic analysis undertaken for the project indicates that the roads will be capable of managing the traffic to beyond 2041.

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Anonymous's avatar
Oct 28, 2021 - 13:36

Although there are 100s against the project there are 1000s for it because it will connect two neighboring regions and give access to some of the amenities in Durham. Can you speak to other potential benefits such as potential employment opportunities and how local businesses and organizations benefit from this project just like the Eglinton LRT

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:07

In addition to the more obvious benefit of providing improved transit for people who live, work, study and play in the corridor, there are several other benefits.

The service will increase mobility and allow people who don’t have access to a car to pursue more opportunities.  This will complement the improved access to sites along eh corridor which will allow businesses to attract more employees.

The increased service will also reduce future pressure on the road network as people who are moving into the area, or who travel along the route will have more choice and can travel without needing a car.  In other places where improved transit is offered we see families choosing not to have a second, or third car, and that their use of the car decreases.  This has obvious environmental benefits from reduced greenhouse gas emissions.

The active transportation elements of the project also enhance local mobility.  Transit trips begin and end as pedestrian or cycling trips, so improving those facilities enhances the benefits of transit.

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Anonymous's avatar

Some projects like the London GO train seem to have been fast tracked for their regions while others like BRT or Bomanville seem to be on a decade long journey. When specifically will the east get some enhancements to their transit problems?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:08

A preliminary implementation plan is included in the presentation and the materials on the website.  The corridor is too long to be constructed all at once and will be subdivided into segments.  Construction will proceed based on funding availability and other factors such as design, permits and approvals and property availability.  Generally, the west end of the corridor in Durham will move forward first and the central and eastern areas later.  Timing in Toronto is still being reviewed but is likely to be undertaken in a similar fashion as the west end has high traffic volumes and more transit delay.  

Construction is likely to begin in 2023 or 2024 in the earliest of the segments.  Some areas will not see any construction before 2027.

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Anonymous's avatar

The interactive map does not show the BRT route to connect with the STC stop.

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:09

The DSBRT buses will turn north on Grangeway and connect to the new bus terminal for the new subway station.  The subway team is designing the integrated bus terminal and providing the requires bus bays.  They are also looking at any required improvements along Grangeway to support all bus activity into the station.

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Anonymous's avatar

Will there be a dedicated bike lane installed? Will there be safe ways to cross the street to access destinations? and will it be safely walkable? I am appalled by the number of deaths of pedestrians and cyclists that we see in this city. Vision Zero starts with design. Limiting speed by design as well as by law is essential.

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:11

Enhanced cycling facilities will be implemented along the corridor.  In the pinch point areas the cycling facilities will be on parallel routes, such as along Mary Street in downtown Whitby.  Cross rides and other safety measures will be applied at intersections to improve safety in accordance with the Vision Zero principles.

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Anonymous's avatar

How will local businesses be compensated due to potential lost revenue this project may cause? How will this project affect local traffic and parking along Hwy 2? e.g., the current Eglinton crosstown mess has been negatively impacting local traffic and businesses for years. Are we to endure the same horrible inconvenience now in Durham?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:24

We recognize that construction can be impactful to area residents and businesses. That is why we are committed to working with the local Chambers of Commerce and Business Improvement Areas to support businesses during construction. Additionally, Metrolinx has an established community benefits and supports program that focuses on ensuring that residents, businesses and communities understand the benefits that these major transit projects will bring to their communities and what supports are available for mitigating construction impacts.

While most elements of our business support program will be determined once a successful proponent comes on board and a contract is in place, we have outlined examples of supports we have provided in other projects.

• Direct, one-to-one individual business supports directed to marketing and promotional ideas and help augment businesses where there is no Chamber/BIA representation.

• Metrolinx, in partnership with the various project delivery partners, implements a suite of flexible and responsive community support initiatives, including engagement, local procurement opportunities, construction mitigation and opportunities for local employment.

• Chamber/BIA support for marketing and event initiatives within the construction corridor.

• Shop Local marketing, signage and advertising during select periods.

The Community Engagement team also works closely with businesses along the corridor and the contractor to ensure any questions or concerns are addressed promptly where possible. This may include things like procuring directional signage and ensuring the site stays clean.

Prior to the start of construction, we will be creating Community Liaison Committees (CLCs) following the Environmental Assessment (EA). Once we’re through the EA process, the CLC will convene to review the design and provide more feedback. This is a great way for the business community to get involved with the project from the beginning.

There are very limited impacts on local traffic and parking.  In downtown Whitby on street parking will be replaced by expanding the parking lot at Byron and Elm.  In downtown Oshawa a small number of parking spaces may be lost, but the design team and City of Oshawa staff are looking to find additional spaces to address this loss.

The major change for local traffic will be the change in driveway and local side street access.  With the introduction of a center median along most of the route, left turns directly into driveways and side streets will be replaced with U-turns at adjacent traffic lights, requiring drivers to go past the driveway, and make a -turn at the next traffic light before returning and turning right.

 

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Anonymous's avatar

You're still not listening ! 1 block of wider sidewalks does not trump our neighbourhoods. How did you decide ? Show us a slide with a direct comparison of the options and why you chose this one. Show us your study data analysis and simulations of traffic patterns with reduction to 1 west lane vs 2 lanes, show the benefits and drawbacks of both.

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:27

Several options were reviewed for downtown Whitby and have been refined based on the priorities we have heard from Town staff, local businesses and the people who live in the area.  The preferred design is a balance of maintaining transit priority, providing capacity for general traffic and encouraging a more walkable downtown. 

Design work considered the traffic report, which is based on a robust regional model and traffic data collected between 2016 and 2019 – all pre-pandemic.  This work indicates that in 2041 a single westbound lane, combined with the improved transit service, will carry the required trips.  
The report also indicates that without implementing the BRT project, the traffic volumes will not be able to be handled by Dundas Street and more traffic on local side streets is likely as drivers look for less congested alternate routes.

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Anonymous's avatar

Will there be any solution to DRT busses not allowing transit users in Scarborough to hop and off in stops that are located within Toronto? The busses already pick up or drop off passengers within these stops. It seems ineffective and backwards not to allow those who want to use it exclusively within Toronto/Scarborough.

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:28

Yes, the intention is to integrate the services such that riders along the corridor can use any bus to travel.

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Anonymous's avatar

This project sounds great. Being that I live in Bowmanville, I would love the project extend further east to Bowmanville. Is that possible in a future phase?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:37

At 36 km the corridor is already quite long.  The eastern limit was selected to document a solution at Simcoe and Center Streets where the future north-south corridor will intersect the King and Bond facility.

The bus service will continue further east in mixed traffic.  A future study will look at connecting the dedicated lanes to the proposed GO Station on Ritson Road.  Extensions further east can also be reviewed as part of that study.

Additional bus services from the east can also use the dedicated lanes.  These services will be planned by DRT when warranted based on ridership and the overall bus route structure in Oshawa.

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daleb's avatar
Oct 28, 2021 - 09:16

heavy traffic on residential streets through Pickering Village? Kingston Road is the only main road that goes through Ajax connecting Ajax, Whitby and Oshawa with Pickering and Toronto. Throttling it to only three lanes of traffic through Pickering Village will greatly increase traffic on residential streets. Do you have a plan to avoid that?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:38

The traffic analysis indicates that the single westbound lane will be able to manage the traffic volumes to beyond 2041.  Two eastbound lanes are proposed to meet demand as eastbound traffic in the afternoon is heavier than westbound traffic in the morning.

The improved transit service will also encourage more people to choose transit for more of their trips, taking pressure off the roads as population and employment growth continues.

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daleb's avatar
Oct 28, 2021 - 09:20

Currently there are 5 lanes of traffic at Church Street in Pickering Village, with no room to add any more. Does you plan eliminate the left turn lanes there and at Elizabeth Street? Would not the elimination of those lanes greatly add to the traffic chaos that your plan to reduce through lanes to only 3 in number is going to create?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:38

Left turns will be maintained at both Elizabeth Street and Church Street.  The traffic analysis also indicates that single westbound lane will be able to manage the traffic volumes t beyond 2041, particularly as the improved BRT service will encourage more people to choose transit for more of their trips, taking pressure off the roads as population and employment growth continues.

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Anonymous's avatar

Where will the road be widened to add space for the BRT vs. where will existing traffic lanes be converted into BRT lanes and therefore reduce car capacity?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:45

Along much of the corridor the intent is to maintain the existing number of traffic lanes and widen the road to add the BRT lanes.  In some of the more congested areas, such as the east end of Ellesmere, Pickering Village and downtown Whitby, there isn’t room to maintain the number of traffic lanes and introduce BRT.  In these pinch points we have analyzed the long term need and are proposing a solution that balances the need for improved transit to manage future congestion and provide adequate road capacity for cars.  The plan as presented achieves these goals.

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Anonymous's avatar

To reduce traffic congestion on the regular road lanes?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:46

Metrolinx is leading the environmental assessment and preliminary engineering for the physical road infrastructure.  DRT and TTC will opera limited number of local TTC buses at the east end of Ellesmere may use the curb lanes to serve local stops.

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Anonymous's avatar

I will need to take the City bus at the beginning and end of my trip on the BRT. Am I going to have to pay two or three separate fares?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 12:48

The intention is to have an integrated fare system so that passengers will only need to ay one fare and that people travelling along the Toronto section will be able to use any of the buses in the corridor.

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Anonymous's avatar

Why are notices and invitations to the meeting being distributed after some meeting have already been held…only days before? This robs individuals the opportunity to actively participate in this process.

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:09

We sincerely apologize you did not receive the notification regarding the public live meeting with enough advance notice. 

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Anonymous's avatar

Now that things are starting to open up, when are going to have open and fair meetings about the concerns of the citizens?
I believe the residents of all the communities would like to have all their questions answered in a public forum. Many people have trouble connecting and are tired of having their comments controlled by one group @ character

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:10

Our team is committed to engaging with the community as we work to move this important transit project forward. We look forward to planning in person meetings and information sessions when it is safe to do so.

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Anonymous's avatar

Are raised crosswalk towards median bus stops being considered as an accessibility and safety feature with this project?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:11

Yes, the design will include a raised crosswalk where it connects to the access to the BRT platform.  This will provide a cue to improve accessibility and will also keep the area free of standing water, which will improve the customer experience.

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Anonymous's avatar

The multi-use path abruptly ends on Kingston Rd./Raspberry Rd - and reappears on Kingston/Altona Rd. The gap that exists along this bridge is the same area Parks Canada is conducting a Parks Improvement Project, creating a new entrance to the trail nearby. Has Metrolinx been in contact with Parks Canada about any possibility to collaborate?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:12

The intention is to include as complete a cycling solution as possible.  The project will not be modifying the Rouge River bridge, and buses will be operating in mixed traffic.  The design team have been coordinating with the City of Toronto, who have this link in their cycling plan.  

As the project moves forward the intention is to get the city to advance this work to implement the cycling facilities at the same time that the DSBRT infrastructure is put in place.

The design will incorporate the latest standards for maintaining safety at intersections.  The intent is to implement a complete solution to improve active transportation along with transit as they compliment each other in improving local mobility.

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Anonymous's avatar
Oct 28, 2021 - 18:38
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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:13

A preliminary implementation plan is included in the presentation and the materials on the website.  The corridor is too long to be constructed all at once and will be subdivided into segments.  Construction will proceed based on funding availability and other factors such as design, permits and approvals and property availability.  Generally, the west end of the corridor in Durham will move forward first and the central and eastern areas later.  Timing in Toronto is still being reviewed but is likely to be undertaken in a similar fashion as the west end has high traffic volumes and more transit delay.  

Construction is likely to begin in 2023 or 2024 in the earliest of the segments.  Some areas will not see any construction before 2027.

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Anonymous's avatar

It seems this is only until Oshawa. Durham pays a lot of taxes and I understand its a huge region, however parts of Durham along the Highway2 corridor are neglected when it comes to transit. I'm a driver and don't take transit however my community of Bowmanville needs more than just the existing 1 bus route
into Oshawa & "on demand" transit.

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:14

At 36 km the corridor is already quite long.  The eastern limit was selected to document a solution at Simcoe and Center Streets where the future north-south corridor will intersect the King and Bond facility.

The bus service will continue further east in mixed traffic.  A future study will look at connecting the dedicated lanes to the proposed GO Station on Ritson Road.  Extensions further east can also be reviewed as part of that study.

Additional bus services from the east can also use the dedicated lanes.  These services will be planned by DRT when warranted based on ridership and the overall bus route structure in Oshawa.

Durham Region Transit reviews their service on a regular basis to balance need with the resources they have.  If you have specific requests for other service in the Region, please reach out to them directly.

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Anonymous's avatar

How are you going to avoid the problems we have see with the work on Ellington

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:18

Construction of LRT requires that major utilities be relocated out from under the tracks to avoid future disruption when access is required to maintain the infrastructure.  Time is also needed to construct the tracks and the electrification system that allows them to operate.  Construction of BRT infrastructure is quite a bit simpler as utilities are only relocated out form under the platforms at the BRT stops.  Work is more similar to a road widening or reconstruction project, which is significantly faster to complete.

The corridor will also be divided into manageable segments to allow work to be completed on one or two construction seasons.  Tis approach will reduce the impacts on the adjacent properties.

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Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 28, 2021 - 19:42

I have no clue what BRT and LRT I wish you would slow down & clearly explain, you speak amounts yourselves knowing what these are! Clarity please when speaking with the community who check in on the occasion, since I know most of us wanted subway not sure what this is?!?!?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:21

BRT is Bus Rapid Transit and LRT is Light Rail Transit.  BRT was defined at the start of the presentation.  It is challenging to provide a brief overview of the project and provide detailed explanations of it as well.  If you still have questions or would like to go over the materials in more detail, please contact us at [email protected]

Bus Rapid Transit is dedicated median lanes that provide a segregated space for buses to operate along the roadway.  Stops are provided in the median with access at crosswalks at signalized intersections.

The choice of technology is based on a number of factors, but ridership and cost are the main factors.  The ridership volumes in this corridor do not warrant subway capacity, and the cost of a subway is very prohibitive given the length of the corridor and the number of people who live along the corridor.  

BRT provides flexibility to route buses in and out of the corridor to respond to local ridership patterns, allows DRT to respond to ridership demands by increasing the number of buses on the route, and provides a high degree of transit priority at a reasonable cost.

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Anonymous's avatar
Oct 28, 2021 - 19:46

I know people trying to join but you provided a link but not the ID number and they dont have data on their phone and went to a computer trying to get in and no one is checking these messages or emails!!!!

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:20

We sincerely apologize for inconveniences experienced while trying to join our live meeting. 

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Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 28, 2021 - 20:00

Reducing lanes to as you say force people to take your transit is horrifying! I will never take a public bus that has proven to be unclean! The government funding is to improve a community not try to force transit! You will get students mostly so make sure you charge them!

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:26

In the meeting we discussed improving transit so that more people will choose public transit for more of their trips.  We understand that transit doesn’t accommodate everyone or every trip.  The intention is to provide options and increase the carrying capacity of the corridor, moving more people to support the planned growth in the area.

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Anonymous's avatar
Oct 28, 2021 - 20:04

Sitting at a green light at 2am and not being allowed to turn left or right is causing pollution, must have times for safety not at 9pm -4am

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:29

Modern traffic signals are more responsive to traffic that is waiting at signals during overnight periods when traffic volumes are lower.  Left turns across the BRT lanes will need to be controlled at all hours as buses, and potentially emergency vehicles, could be using the BRT lanes.

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Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 28, 2021 - 20:12

Safety is not limiting traffic lanes reduced to one lane each direction!

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:30

The design of the DSBRT corridor is based on the principles of Vision Zero.  A roadway with a single lane of traffic in each direction is not inherently less safe than a wider road, in fact wider roads are often less safe with lane changes and differential speeds of vehicles.

In areas where there is a single traffic lane adjacent to a BRT lane, the BRT lane would be available for emergency services vehicles to bypass congestion, maintaining or improving response time.

If there is an incident in the general traffic lane, police will direct traffic to use the BRT lane, the way they manage traffic at incidents where traffic needs to be diverted around incidents.

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daleb's avatar

There are currently 5 lanes at Church Street and at Elizabeth Street, with, apparently no room to add any more. Are the left turn lanes at those intersections to be eliminated?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:34

Left turns will be maintained at both Elizabeth Street and Church Street.  The traffic analysis also indicates that single westbound lane will be able to manage the traffic volumes t beyond 2041, particularly as the improved BRT service will encourage more people to choose transit for more of their trips, taking pressure off the roads as population and employment growth continues.

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Anonymous's avatar

1. In view of the proposed 7 condominium buildings being built in the Hwy2 Valley Farm area, what measures are being taken to ensure traffic line ups at lights in those areas will be at a minimum.
2. Will any maps be produced reflecting the new roadway and any additional buildings being considered.

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:35

The planning in the downtown Pickering area considered the planned development included in the City’s plans.  As development applications for the various buildings are received they will be integrated into the plans.  City staff have been involved in the planning and are aware of the stop locations and infrastructure being proposed to provide an integrated and coordinated solution.

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Anonymous's avatar
Oct 28, 2021 - 19:09

Trying to join

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:36

We sincerely apologize for inconveniences experienced while trying to join our live meeting. 

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Anonymous's avatar

What kind of noise barriers are planned by the Region in this specific area to deflect the increased noise from the traffic that will be closer to my home?

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Anonymous's avatar

It seems that a BRT only along 1 corridor wil tend to concentrate the Pickering population along a single corridor making living there a less the ideal experience. Was is being doe to mitigate this?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:37

The City of Pickering has developed a plan for the downtown corridor along Kingston Road, which has been included in the population and employment growth forecasts used in the ridership and traffic modelling.  Part of this plan is to increase the density along this corridor to reduce the pressure to expand the urban boundary.  

This project is designed to identify the solution for this once corridor, but other corridors are included in Metrolinx’s 2041 Regional Transportation Plan.

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Anonymous's avatar
Oct 28, 2021 - 19:32

If you are stating you are environment concious by reducing four lanes in Scarborough down to one lane each way is causing idling vehicles near Rouge Valley. We ask to not widen sidewalk and keep two lanes each way east of Markham road on Ellesmere rd pls. We seek to improve traffic flow not reduce it, we will never agree to this reduction!

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:38

There will continue to be four lanes for general traffic west of Morningside and through the UTSC/Centennial Campus area as far east as Military Trail.  The segment of Ellesmere between Military Trail and Kingston Road will provide two general traffic lanes and BRT lanes to address neighbourhood concerns.  On Kingston Road between Ellesmere and the Rouge Valley the design will maintain four general traffic lanes.  Details of the design can be found on the website or by looking at the interactive map.

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Isabella's avatar

What traffic calming measures to protect pedestrian safety are you planning for Mary Street in Whitby - which is primarily residential and home to seniors and families - given the significant increase in diverted highway traffic volume on that street which will result, due to the restriction of westbound traffic on Dundas Street to 1 lane?

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:39

The traffic analysis does not indicate a significant amount of traffic being diverted to Mary Street.  The single through lane is sufficient to handle the majority of the traffic.

The analysis also found that the amount of traffic on local roads, including Mary Street, will be higher without the BRT as fewer people will ride public transit and will travel by car.  This increased congestion will add more traffic to local streets that we see with the BRT in place.

We continue to work with the Town of Whitby to look at what improvements may be needed on Mary Street.  

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Furry Rider's avatar

The DSBRT should extend beyond this busy part of Oshawa so that those travelling from less densely populated areas don't have to drive into the more densely populated area to catch a bus; this is poor planning on your part - If you want to encourage people to take transit, you need to make it as easy and quick as possible for them

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:42

At 36 km the corridor is already quite long.  The eastern limit was selected to document a solution at Simcoe and Center Streets where the future north-south corridor will intersect the King and Bond facility.

The bus service will continue further east in mixed traffic.  A future study will look at connecting the dedicated lanes to the proposed GO Station on Ritson Road.  Extensions further east can also be reviewed as part of that study.

Additional bus services from the east can also use the dedicated lanes.  These services will be planned by DRT when warranted based on ridership and the overall bus route structure in Oshawa.

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Anonymous's avatar

What measures will be in place, ie. giving us priority to do a left hand turn from King St W onto Thornton Rd S, so that we can access our home in the neighbourhood, behind Fraser Ford. It is already difficult at times to access, often requires to wait for a 2nd set of lights even when there are only 2 or 3 vehicles waiting to turn! thanks

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Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:43

With the implementation of the BRT median lanes and the stop to serve the local neighbourhood, we will also be introducing a dedicated left-turn/U-turn phase to manage the traffic crossing the BRT lanes.  This should provide better opportunities to turn left than exists today.

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Anonymous's avatar

Has this already been approved.
With all the construction being planned along Kingston Rd will this b built b4 or after this construction.
And how will this affect the properties in and past Puckering Village and on

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Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:44

We are in the last stages of the environmental assessment and will be progressing into detailed design.  Funding for construction will be sought as soon as the environmental assessment is approved.  The intention is to construct the lanes as quickly as possible to provide people travelling along the corridor with improved service.  Some of the planned development will be in place before the BRT is completed, and some will be under construction at the same time.  The objective is to have the BRT in place before too much of the new development is in place.

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Anonymous's avatar
Oct 28, 2021 - 18:08

Given that Metrolinx will be planting three new trees in place of every impacted tree, has there been any consideration to replant trees not just along the roads of the corridor (Ellesmere, Kingston) but also in surrounding green spaces and parks (which are areas more protected from future developments)? Similar to the tree planting project in RNUP

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Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:48

Yes.  The intent is to replace trees right along the corridor where possible but other areas adjacent to the corridor will also be considered, such as open areas and parks.

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Anonymous's avatar

How have your updated estimates as work-from-home will likely permanently reduce ridership?

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Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:53

The traffic report is based on a robust regional model and traffic data collected between 2016 and 2019 – all pre-pandemic.  This work indicates that in 2041 a single westbound lane, combined with the improved transit service, will carry the required trips. 

The report also indicates that without implementing the BRT project, traffic volumes will not be sustained by Dundas Street and more traffic on local side streets is likely as drivers look for less congested alternate routes. 

The pre-pandemic analysis is considered valid as it represents conditions in 2041, which will very likely reflect pre-pandemic travel patterns.

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Anonymous
Oct 28, 2021 - 19:01

What is the call in number or zoom ID not listed

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Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:50

We sincerely apologize for inconveniences experienced while trying to join our live meeting. 

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Anonymous's avatar

I'm very concerned about this project. It looks like it will take away my front yard. I have tenant parking in front of my house... Also I will never be able to turn left from my home or into my driveway. Looking out at a monster road and bike lanes. For the amount of Whitbians and Durhamites that don't drive? I have buses traveling buy all the tim

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Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:51

Cochrane/Annes is an important north-south street in the west end of downtown.  To provide improved transit access, a BRT stop is planned here.  This will improve transit access to the neighbourhood.  With the introduction of the median BRT lanes the number of opportunities to turn left across the BRT lanes is limited, and left turns/U-turns will be permitted at the traffic signal to maintain access to the areas north and south of Dundas.  The traffic volumes also suggest that a dedicated eastbound right turn lane is required to manage traffic, particularly in the afternoon peak period.

The combination of the BRT stop, the left turn/U-tun provisions and right turn lane will require lane from the current landowners on each side of Dundas Street.

In determining the potential impacts the team worked with staff at the Town of Whitby and used the Town’s Official Plan to assess the design.  The Official Plan protects for an ultimate road right-of-way along this segment of Dundas Street that is xx metres wide.  The proposed design fits within this Official Plan designated width.

We recognize that this will reduce the depth of front yards.  During detailed design we will work with you and other landowners to look for opportunities to reduce the impacts and the ability to maintain parking.

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Anonymous's avatar

Traffic is generally light on Ellesmere between Kingston and Neilson and highly residential. Buses often are virtually empty except during rush hour. Why are simple 'red' dedicated bus lanes not being considered rather than the far larger expense of metro-linx to maintain the quality of life for local residents being most negatively impacted?

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Stephanie
Dec 29, 2021 - 13:52

Various options, including ‘red’ curb lanes were investigated early in the design process and do not provide the degree of reliability needed to make the project a success.  Curb lanes are susceptible to delays due to weather or other events such as incidents on Highway 401.  Maintaining segregation of the BRT service from general traffic has been shown to improve speed and reliability giving riders assurance that they can travel in a predicable way.

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