> Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit LIVE - October 26, 2021 | Metrolinx Engage

Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit LIVE - October 26, 2021

 

Call-In With Your Question

As we continue to evolve the virtual engagement format, we are adding a call-in option for tonight’s event. To ask your question by voice, join the Zoom meeting here. We aim to keep each question and subsequent answer to 3 minutes allowing for as many call-in questions as possible.

NOTE: please ensure you have the latest version of Zoom installed.

Join Zoom

Agenda

6:30PM - 7:00PM: Project Update

7:00PM - 7:30PM: Questions and Answers to Pre-Submitted Questions

7:30PM - 8:00PM: Call-in Questions

Presentation Materials

Meet the Speakers

Stephanie Cardenas headshot

Stephanie Cardenas

Moderator

Leona Hollingsworth

Leona Hollingsworth

Director, Community Engagement, Metrolinx

Photo of Mathieu Goetzke

Mathieu Goetzke

Vice President, Planning, Metrolinx

Photo of David Hopper

David Hopper

Consultant Lead, Parsons/IBI Group

Madelin Blacha

Madelin Blacha

Project Coordinator Environmental P&A, Metrolinx

Format & Accessibility

Questions will be answered based on popularity (total votes). We aim to answer all questions.

Please review and note that conduct inconsistent with our policies will result in removal.

To enable closed captioning, toggle captions “on” in the YouTube video player settings.

 

Comment Sort

  • Sort questions:
  • Date
  • Popularity

Comments

Anonymous's avatar

Can you please provide current (post-Covid commuting) study data on expected traffic volumes and neighbourhood traffic infiltration with only 1 shared westbound lane in downtown Whitby ? Need to understand that impact to the whole community against the value of having a slightly wider sidewalk for one block Brock to Byron.

  • Vote for this question14
  • Downvote this question4
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:10

The traffic report is based on a robust regional model and traffic data collected between 2016 and 2019 – all pre-pandemic.  This work indicates that in 2041 a single westbound lane, combined with the improved transit service, will carry the required trips. 

The report also indicates that without implementing the BRT project, traffic volumes will not be sustained by Dundas Street and more traffic on local side streets is likely as drivers look for less congested alternate routes. 

The pre-pandemic analysis is considered valid as it represents conditions in 2041, which will very likely reflect pre-pandemic travel patterns.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Furry Rider's avatar

The DSBRT should extend beyond this busy part of Oshawa so that those travelling from less densely populated areas don't have to drive into the more densely populated area to catch a bus; this is poor planning on your part - If you want to encourage people to take transit, you need to make it as easy and quick as possible for them

  • Vote for this question8
  • Downvote this question1
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:12

At 36 km the corridor is already quite long.  The eastern limit was selected to document a solution at Simcoe and Center Streets where the future north-south corridor will intersect the King and Bond facility.

The bus service will continue further east in mixed traffic.  A future study will look at connecting the dedicated lanes to the proposed GO Station on Ritson Road.  Extensions further east can also be reviewed as part of that study.

Additional bus services from the east can also use the dedicated lanes.  These services will be planned by DRT when warranted based on ridership and the overall bus route structure in Oshawa.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 26, 2021 - 19:15

what are the hours this will run? my bedroom is right on bond and already so noisy. every 5 minutes is excessive outside of rush hour. how late in the evening are you forcing this on us? Is this a done deal? when does construction begin?

  • Vote for this question3
  • Downvote this question0
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:17

The service hours will be set by DRT and TTC.  They are likely to be the same as the Pulse 900 service today, which is from 5:00am to 12:45am. The Blue Night N1 route provides some limited overnight service.

The environmental assessment and preliminary design business case work will be completed by Spring 2022.  Detailed design in some segments is currently underway however construction is not expected to start until 2023 or 2024 in the west end of the Region.  The segment in Oshawa is currently unfunded, and construction timing is currently unknown.  We will contact people as detailed design begins and provide more information on construction timing once it is known.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Oct 14, 2021 - 10:17

Currently, there are GO dedicated buses that run between Scarborough Centre to Durham. There are GO trains and the Durham Pulse bus that also cover this route. Those are THREE systems already covering these routes. A "rapid bus line" along this route is redundant.

  • Vote for this question12
  • Downvote this question10
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:26

The intent of the project it to introduce improved infrastructure to improve the performance along the corridor.  TTC and DRT will be operating the vehicles and GO buses can also use the lanes.  The project will permit a variety of routes to provide more reliable travel times to encourage more people to choose transit for more of their trips.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Through the narrow portion of downtown Whitby, the buses should simply join general traffic lanes rather than creating a major bottleneck for the purposes of continuity of the lane.

  • Vote for this question4
  • Downvote this question2
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:17

The service hours will be set by DRT and TTC.  They are likely to be the same as the Pulse 900 service today, which is from 5:00am to 12:45am. The Blue Night N1 route provides some limited overnight service.

The environmental assessment and preliminary design business case work will be completed by Spring 2022.  Detailed design in some segments is currently underway however construction is not expected to start until 2023 or 2024 in the west end of the Region.  The segment in Oshawa is currently unfunded, and construction timing is currently unknown.  We will contact people as detailed design begins and provide more information on construction timing once it is known.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 24, 2021 - 10:52

I have observed the expansions through Ajax, Markham, Vaughan, Newmarket and York Region in general.
The dedicated bus lanes cost millions of dollars.
I see few buses and not very full buses in the bus lanes, however I do see traffic congestion for cars.
Would it not be wiser to just serve the many? Are there statistics to justify bus lanes?

  • Vote for this question6
  • Downvote this question4
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:14

Bus Rapid Transit was identified as the preferred transit technology to link Durham Region and the City of Toronto through the Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit Initial Business Case (IBC), and was identified in the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan.

When it comes to building transit, we know that every decision matters to our communities. Metrolinx is committed to engaging with the community as we work to move this important transit project forward.

All comments received will be documented in the public record for this project in the Environmental Project Report. Some of the comments received will be carried forward to detail design.

 
  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Oct 26, 2021 - 17:19

We do not want a lane to be removed in downtown Whitby. This will send highway traffic onto our residential side streets. This is highly dangerous as there are families, schools, a day care and retirement residences on these streets. You ask for our input, we have spoken against this…why are you not listening to us?

  • Vote for this question3
  • Downvote this question1
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:20

Bus Rapid Transit was identified as the preferred transit technology to link Durham Region and the City of Toronto through the Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit Initial Business Case (IBC), and was identified in the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan.

When it comes to building transit, we know that every decision matters to our communities. Metrolinx is committed to engaging with the community as we work to move this important transit project forward.

All comments received will be documented in the public record for this project in the Environmental Project Report. Some of the comments received will be carried forward to detail design. 

 

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 26, 2021 - 19:17

What type of buses will be running on the BRT lane, would it be all electric? Will there be fast charging at some bus stations?

  • Vote for this question2
  • Downvote this question0
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:23

TTC and DRT are currently investigating and testing fully electric vehicles, including their performance on different route types including the long BRT route.  The intention is to continue the process of moving to more fuel-efficient vehicles to further reduce vehicle emissions.

It is too early to know if fully electric vehicles and charging stations are needed for the corridor.  This will evolve as the bus technology evolves.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

I am very concerned that we need to provide safety for pedestrians and cyclists at the same time as we design better transit and bus routes. How can we support inclusion of dedicated space for bike lanes? I'm also concerned that pedestrians have to walk huge distances to cross at lights or risk jaywalking, which can be deadly. Is this in the plan?

  • Vote for this question2
  • Downvote this question1
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:30

In developing the plan, the cycling facilities are provided immediately adjacent to the corridor except in areas where there are major constraints, such as downtown Whitby.  In lieu of a facility along Dundas the project the team reviewed local cycling plans and will use the plans adopted by the local municipalities.

For Whitby that solution involves the Raglan/Mary/Garden facility planned by the Town.  The project team are working with the Town to implement this facility in parallel with the BRT.

There is a protected pedestrian refuge area at the crosswalk so that it is safe for passengers to queue while they wait for their walk signal at the traffic light.  It will also allow pedestrians to make a two-stage crossing if necessary.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

venson. too noisy already! when is this going to start? I think you are actually forcing me to move!

  • Vote for this question2
  • Downvote this question1
Anonymous's avatar

Please elaborate on what will be the end-to-end norms for service re Accessibility.

  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question0
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:34

The service has been designed to be fully accessible and meet the AODA standards.  Sidewalks will connect to the signalized intersections at each stop location.  Controlled pedestrian crosswalks will provide access to the median stops.  Where the crosswalk meets the ramp to the BRT stops there will be a protected pedestrian refuge for people exiting who need to wait for a walk signal and for those who need to make a two-stage pedestrian crossing.  The sloped walkway from the crosswalk to the BRT platform will have a grade less than 5%.

On the platform there will be designated accessible waiting areas with fold-up bench seats.  Turning radii to meet AODA will be provided to be able to access the buses.  There is also adequate space to deploy the bus ramp to permit access/egress from the bus.

Durham is also exploring the idea of raising the platform height to match the bus floor height to eliminate the need to deploy a ramp for the dedicated BRT fleet of buses.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 26, 2021 - 19:13

what do you mean by curbside lane being unused? Do you mean you are taking the barrier between sidewalk and road and turning it to a driving lane?

  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question0
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 10:59

The space between the sidewalk and roadway will be repurposed to provide cycling facilities that are behind the curb.

 To create safer cycling facilities, the new cycle tracks will be constructed behind the curb.  Often that space is grassed today to create a generous buffer between pedestrians and the edge of the roadway.  The intention is to place the cycle track in that space, and where necessary move the sidewalk further away from the road to create cycle tracks that have adequate separation from the curb and from the sidewalk. 

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

… Oshawa have been ignored. This area constitutes huge future growth. Why did thus occur?

  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question0
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 11:00

At 36 km the corridor is already quite long.  The eastern limit was selected to document a solution at Simcoe and Center Streets where the future north-south corridor will intersect the King and Bond facility.

The bus service will continue further east in mixed traffic.  A future study will look at connecting the dedicated lanes to the proposed GO Station on Ritson Road.  Extensions further east can also be reviewed as part of that study.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Were your estimates based on traffic flow patterns in the pre-Pandemic period? Will these estimates be revised to reflect the expectation of an enduring reduction in M-F Daily Traffic Flows post-Pandemic based on what has occurred and how employers have adapted. The shortages in manpower resources are expected to lead to a continued at-home work

  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question0
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 11:03

The traffic report is based on a robust regional model and traffic data collected between 2016 and 2019 – all pre-pandemic.  Metrolinx and other transit agencies are working to understand how travel behaviour will change after the pandemic ends.  Early findings indicate that routes such as the BRT is less impacted that the Go Train as many of the jobs and activities along the corridor require workers and customers to be there in person.  This includes manufacturing, health care, college and university campuses and retail.  Services like the GO Train that focus longer distance commutes on the downtown core of Toronto have been affected more severely and are expected to take longer to recover.

The other finding is that the morning and afternoon peak periods are likely to extend and be less intense.  This is actually good for transit as fewer vehicles are needed for the relatively short morning and afternoon peak periods and a more frequent service will operate all day. 

Regardless of the timing of the post-pandemic return to travel, by 2041 we expect that the travel projections will be close to what we will see based on the significant growth in population and employment in the corridor.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 26, 2021 - 19:34

Can you speak to the opposition that you have come across while consulting on this project and if it's focused in any region(s) any perhaps why. What positive notes have you heard from community members to this project. How do you plan to solve any community position issues?

  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question0
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 13:54

Bus Rapid Transit was identified as the preferred transit technology to link Durham Region and the City of Toronto through the Durham-Scarborough Bus Rapid Transit Initial Business Case (IBC), and was identified in the 2041 Regional Transportation Plan.

When it comes to building transit, we know that every decision matters to our communities. Metrolinx is committed to engaging with the community as we work to move this important transit project forward.

All comments received will be documented in the public record for this project in the Environmental Project Report. Some of the comments received will be carried forward to detail design.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

The Sept session there was a slide of the initial business case benefits. How was the 208 fewer traffic injuries or deaths obtained? Over what period or time frame, 1 year or many years? How were the other numbers determined? How was 686 Million in economic benefits number determined? I'd like to understand how these numbers were derived.

  • Vote for this question2
  • Downvote this question2
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 13:58

The benefits accrue over the 30-year period from 2028, when the infrastructure is expected to be complete until 2058.

Reduction in traffic injuries is based on the reduction in vehicle-km of automobile travel as transit is safer that driving.

The IBC provides information on how the $686 million economic benefits were calculated.  It includes existing and new travel time costs, reliability and quality savings, vehicle operating savings, as well as safety congestion and emission reduction savings.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Oct 26, 2021 - 18:42

2025?

  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question1
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 13:59

The environmental assessment and Preliminary Design Business Case will be complete by the Spring of 2022.  This will permit Metrolinx, Toronto and Durham to apply for funding to support construction.  Durham has received some federal funding to advance design such that some construction will start in the Summer of 2023 or 2024.

Other segments of the corridor, particularly at the east end of Ellesmere and east Whitby and Oshawa are not likely to start for several years.  More communication will come out as detailed design and construction work starts.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Please elaborate on the intended implications to roads that are parallel to Hwy2 within the Downtown Whitby Core when selecting a 3-lanes solution for this area.

  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question1
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 14:01

The traffic study indicates that there will be some traffic diversion off of Dundas Street.  Long distance regional-scale trips will likely divert to Taunton or Highway 401, mid-distance municipal scale trips are likely to divert to other arterial and major collection streets such as Rossland and Burns, and short-distance trips within Whitby are likely to divert onto more local streets. 

The study also found that the added trips carried by the BRT will reduce auto demand and congestion and result in fewer trips diverting on to local streets that if BRT is not implemented.  That is, with higher order transit there is less future demand reducing congestion and taking pressure off all streets, including local streets.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

... when they off load in the middle of the road?

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 14:02

Median BRT stops are provided with a suite of pedestrian protection measures.  At the stop, passengers are protected by a concrete barrier along the back of the platform with glazing up to the canopy to protect from water and salt spray as well as vehicle intrusion.  The walkway from the crosswalk to the platform is also protected from the adjacent active travel lane.

There is a protected pedestrian refuge area at the crosswalk so that it is safe for passengers to queue while they wait for their walk signal at the traffic light.  It will also allow pedestrians to make a two-stage crossing if necessary.

All of the median stops are at signalized intersections, so passengers will have a crosswalk to access the platforms.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar

Anonymous
Oct 26, 2021 - 19:52

I really need to know when construction will begin around Stevenson. I will need to sell. This is a serious question

  • Vote for this question1
  • Downvote this question1
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 14:03

There is no commitment to funding for construction at this point.  The implementation plan indicates that the portion of the corridor in Oshawa will likely be constructed the later stages o the project, with work not anticipated to start before 2027.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Oct 26, 2021 - 19:23

If so, what are the diameters of the cycling protection. Will the barriers be large tall enough to provide protections.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question2
Stephanie's avatar

Stephanie
Dec 13, 2021 - 14:04

Cycling facilities are raised to curb height and offset form the back of curb, similar to the way sidewalks are treated.  This provides a safer solution for cyclists.

  • Vote for this question0
  • Downvote this question0
Anonymous's avatar
Oct 14, 2021 - 10:07

How is Durham Region implementing noise barriers along those residential properties directly located along Kingston Road (west of Liverpool Rd., east of Walnut Lane, Pickering)? Currently there are none.

  • Vote for this question4
  • Downvote this question7